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Dave Winter mentions the following tools for managing change in our schools:

Elearning planning framework 

Educational positioning system

 

Dave was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Dave Winter mentions the following tools for managing change in our schools:

Elearning planning framework 

Educational positioning system

 

Dave was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Speaker: Dave Winter

Dave Winter, project director of the connected learning community in Hamilton, talks about three things he considers as important in education today: Strategies to deal with the change that comes with the ultrafast broadband roll out; the digital society; and the connection between teaching as inquiry and professional learning communities.

Views 18,976
Date added: 12 Dec 2012
Duration: 4:55

Hello everyone, I'm Dave Winter, I'm project director of the connected learning community in Hamilton, New Zealand. 

Today I want to talk about three things that I think are really important in education today. Particularly in our country it is quite exciting at the moment because we have got the ultrafast fibre rollout but we've got to manage that change. The good thing is that we've got some strategies for change now, we're all slightly more familiar with it. The next thing I want to talk about is digital society, and the final thing I want to talk about is teaching as inquiry and professional learning communities as a way to build this up.

So in terms of the ultrafast fibre, one group of schools who've been really struggling until now with broadband access is secondary schools. They've got more students and they haven't really had a pathway through that sort of bottleneck. Now they've got that bottleneck is going to be solved for them, it's all pretty affordable so I think people are going to jump on board. But we've still got to manage the change because it means our schools are going to change. And I just wanted to reference a couple things about change that we are more familiar with now. The idea that within change we've got culture, we've got people, and we've got processes. So we need to be working on all those levels. And we've got some neat tools now too. So we've got the elearning planning framework coming out from the Ministry and we've also got the educational positioning system from Derek Wenmoth and Julia Atkin. And if we can apply those tools or look at culture and processes and people as well as just the technicality of managing change we will be in a better position.

The second thing I would like to talk about is digital society. Now I've been fortunate enough to work in a school where the students have had their own devices now for four years. I always thought the most important thing was we were going to be able to extend our learning out from the school and really get into those students' homes. The funny thing is, I have come to realise that it's not just about that, it is actually a two way street. When the students come in with their devices they are bringing in their ideas, what they're trying, their hopes and dreams as well. And we've got to sort of meet those two things together. We have a lot of people realising that digital citizenship is right in the very centre and the very heart of this learning that people are going to be doing, especially within the bring your own device or one to one environment. What I think we also need to realise is that digital citizenship is not just for students, it's not something that we want them to be, it is for our whole society. So we've got to make sure we are making moves for our own digital citizenship for our own understanding of our digital footprint, and for our own development of our digital capability. We've just got to invest a little bit of time into this and people have got some great ways of being successful with this now. We have seen all the professional and personal learning networks that have developed, they're fantastic.

At the moment I'm conducting a very small inquiry into the use of computer programming software, a bit geeky I know, but to look at geometry in maths, to explore geometry in maths. But when I've conducted my inquiry, when I have some student voice, when I have some understanding of what students have achieved, I need to then be able to bring that back to a wider group so that they too can understand and jump past base one. And I think this needs to happen at a number of levels. It needs to happen at a global level and it does, it needs to happen at a national level and it does. I think we really need to start pushing this at a local, slightly more regional level, which is where this project that I'm involved in and this community I'm involved in comes in. 

If we get people who have the opportunity to regularly meet face to face to perhaps become friends in both the online world and the offline world, the greatest opportunity for that happens at a local level. And right at the bottom of that in some ways, and also at the top of that, is within our schools. So let's make sure that within our schools we've got lots of people conducting inquiries into learning and sharing that with each other. 

Hello everyone, I'm Dave Winter, I'm project director of the connected learning community in Hamilton, New Zealand. 

Today I want to talk about three things that I think are really important in education today. Particularly in our country it is quite exciting at the moment because we have got the ultrafast fibre rollout but we've got to manage that change. The good thing is that we've got some strategies for change now, we're all slightly more familiar with it. The next thing I want to talk about is digital society, and the final thing I want to talk about is teaching as inquiry and professional learning communities as a way to build this up.

So in terms of the ultrafast fibre, one group of schools who've been really struggling until now with broadband access is secondary schools. They've got more students and they haven't really had a pathway through that sort of bottleneck. Now they've got that bottleneck is going to be solved for them, it's all pretty affordable so I think people are going to jump on board. But we've still got to manage the change because it means our schools are going to change. And I just wanted to reference a couple things about change that we are more familiar with now. The idea that within change we've got culture, we've got people, and we've got processes. So we need to be working on all those levels. And we've got some neat tools now too. So we've got the elearning planning framework coming out from the Ministry and we've also got the educational positioning system from Derek Wenmoth and Julia Atkin. And if we can apply those tools or look at culture and processes and people as well as just the technicality of managing change we will be in a better position.

The second thing I would like to talk about is digital society. Now I've been fortunate enough to work in a school where the students have had their own devices now for four years. I always thought the most important thing was we were going to be able to extend our learning out from the school and really get into those students' homes. The funny thing is, I have come to realise that it's not just about that, it is actually a two way street. When the students come in with their devices they are bringing in their ideas, what they're trying, their hopes and dreams as well. And we've got to sort of meet those two things together. We have a lot of people realising that digital citizenship is right in the very centre and the very heart of this learning that people are going to be doing, especially within the bring your own device or one to one environment. What I think we also need to realise is that digital citizenship is not just for students, it's not something that we want them to be, it is for our whole society. So we've got to make sure we are making moves for our own digital citizenship for our own understanding of our digital footprint, and for our own development of our digital capability. We've just got to invest a little bit of time into this and people have got some great ways of being successful with this now. We have seen all the professional and personal learning networks that have developed, they're fantastic.

At the moment I'm conducting a very small inquiry into the use of computer programming software, a bit geeky I know, but to look at geometry in maths, to explore geometry in maths. But when I've conducted my inquiry, when I have some student voice, when I have some understanding of what students have achieved, I need to then be able to bring that back to a wider group so that they too can understand and jump past base one. And I think this needs to happen at a number of levels. It needs to happen at a global level and it does, it needs to happen at a national level and it does. I think we really need to start pushing this at a local, slightly more regional level, which is where this project that I'm involved in and this community I'm involved in comes in. 

If we get people who have the opportunity to regularly meet face to face to perhaps become friends in both the online world and the offline world, the greatest opportunity for that happens at a local level. And right at the bottom of that in some ways, and also at the top of that, is within our schools. So let's make sure that within our schools we've got lots of people conducting inquiries into learning and sharing that with each other. 

Date added: 12/12/2012
Aiming high with technology
Date added: 12/12/2012

Aiming high with technology

Dave Winter, project director of the connected learning community in Hamilton, talks about three things he considers as important in education today: Strategies to deal with the change that comes with the ultrafast broadband roll out; the digital society; and the connection between teaching as inquiry and professional learning communities.

Views 18,976 Date added: 12/12/2012

Aiming high with technology

Hello everyone, I'm Dave Winter, I'm project director of the connected learning community in Hamilton, New Zealand. 

Today I want to talk about three things that I think are really important in education today. Particularly in our country it is quite exciting at the moment because we have got the ultrafast fibre rollout but we've got to manage that change. The good thing is that we've got some strategies for change now, we're all slightly more familiar with it. The next thing I want to talk about is digital society, and the final thing I want to talk about is teaching as inquiry and professional learning communities as a way to build this up.

So in terms of the ultrafast fibre, one group of schools who've been really struggling until now with broadband access is secondary schools. They've got more students and they haven't really had a pathway through that sort of bottleneck. Now they've got that bottleneck is going to be solved for them, it's all pretty affordable so I think people are going to jump on board. But we've still got to manage the change because it means our schools are going to change. And I just wanted to reference a couple things about change that we are more familiar with now. The idea that within change we've got culture, we've got people, and we've got processes. So we need to be working on all those levels. And we've got some neat tools now too. So we've got the elearning planning framework coming out from the Ministry and we've also got the educational positioning system from Derek Wenmoth and Julia Atkin. And if we can apply those tools or look at culture and processes and people as well as just the technicality of managing change we will be in a better position.

The second thing I would like to talk about is digital society. Now I've been fortunate enough to work in a school where the students have had their own devices now for four years. I always thought the most important thing was we were going to be able to extend our learning out from the school and really get into those students' homes. The funny thing is, I have come to realise that it's not just about that, it is actually a two way street. When the students come in with their devices they are bringing in their ideas, what they're trying, their hopes and dreams as well. And we've got to sort of meet those two things together. We have a lot of people realising that digital citizenship is right in the very centre and the very heart of this learning that people are going to be doing, especially within the bring your own device or one to one environment. What I think we also need to realise is that digital citizenship is not just for students, it's not something that we want them to be, it is for our whole society. So we've got to make sure we are making moves for our own digital citizenship for our own understanding of our digital footprint, and for our own development of our digital capability. We've just got to invest a little bit of time into this and people have got some great ways of being successful with this now. We have seen all the professional and personal learning networks that have developed, they're fantastic.

At the moment I'm conducting a very small inquiry into the use of computer programming software, a bit geeky I know, but to look at geometry in maths, to explore geometry in maths. But when I've conducted my inquiry, when I have some student voice, when I have some understanding of what students have achieved, I need to then be able to bring that back to a wider group so that they too can understand and jump past base one. And I think this needs to happen at a number of levels. It needs to happen at a global level and it does, it needs to happen at a national level and it does. I think we really need to start pushing this at a local, slightly more regional level, which is where this project that I'm involved in and this community I'm involved in comes in. 

If we get people who have the opportunity to regularly meet face to face to perhaps become friends in both the online world and the offline world, the greatest opportunity for that happens at a local level. And right at the bottom of that in some ways, and also at the top of that, is within our schools. So let's make sure that within our schools we've got lots of people conducting inquiries into learning and sharing that with each other. 

Hello everyone, I'm Dave Winter, I'm project director of the connected learning community in Hamilton, New Zealand. 

Today I want to talk about three things that I think are really important in education today. Particularly in our country it is quite exciting at the moment because we have got the ultrafast fibre rollout but we've got to manage that change. The good thing is that we've got some strategies for change now, we're all slightly more familiar with it. The next thing I want to talk about is digital society, and the final thing I want to talk about is teaching as inquiry and professional learning communities as a way to build this up.

So in terms of the ultrafast fibre, one group of schools who've been really struggling until now with broadband access is secondary schools. They've got more students and they haven't really had a pathway through that sort of bottleneck. Now they've got that bottleneck is going to be solved for them, it's all pretty affordable so I think people are going to jump on board. But we've still got to manage the change because it means our schools are going to change. And I just wanted to reference a couple things about change that we are more familiar with now. The idea that within change we've got culture, we've got people, and we've got processes. So we need to be working on all those levels. And we've got some neat tools now too. So we've got the elearning planning framework coming out from the Ministry and we've also got the educational positioning system from Derek Wenmoth and Julia Atkin. And if we can apply those tools or look at culture and processes and people as well as just the technicality of managing change we will be in a better position.

The second thing I would like to talk about is digital society. Now I've been fortunate enough to work in a school where the students have had their own devices now for four years. I always thought the most important thing was we were going to be able to extend our learning out from the school and really get into those students' homes. The funny thing is, I have come to realise that it's not just about that, it is actually a two way street. When the students come in with their devices they are bringing in their ideas, what they're trying, their hopes and dreams as well. And we've got to sort of meet those two things together. We have a lot of people realising that digital citizenship is right in the very centre and the very heart of this learning that people are going to be doing, especially within the bring your own device or one to one environment. What I think we also need to realise is that digital citizenship is not just for students, it's not something that we want them to be, it is for our whole society. So we've got to make sure we are making moves for our own digital citizenship for our own understanding of our digital footprint, and for our own development of our digital capability. We've just got to invest a little bit of time into this and people have got some great ways of being successful with this now. We have seen all the professional and personal learning networks that have developed, they're fantastic.

At the moment I'm conducting a very small inquiry into the use of computer programming software, a bit geeky I know, but to look at geometry in maths, to explore geometry in maths. But when I've conducted my inquiry, when I have some student voice, when I have some understanding of what students have achieved, I need to then be able to bring that back to a wider group so that they too can understand and jump past base one. And I think this needs to happen at a number of levels. It needs to happen at a global level and it does, it needs to happen at a national level and it does. I think we really need to start pushing this at a local, slightly more regional level, which is where this project that I'm involved in and this community I'm involved in comes in. 

If we get people who have the opportunity to regularly meet face to face to perhaps become friends in both the online world and the offline world, the greatest opportunity for that happens at a local level. And right at the bottom of that in some ways, and also at the top of that, is within our schools. So let's make sure that within our schools we've got lots of people conducting inquiries into learning and sharing that with each other. 

Date added: 12/12/2012

Aiming high with technology

Dave Winter, project director of the connected learning community in Hamilton, talks about three things he considers as important in education today: Strategies to deal with the change that comes with the ultrafast broadband roll out; the digital society; and the connection between teaching as inquiry and professional learning communities.

Views 18,976 Date added: 12/12/2012

Aiming high with technology

Hello everyone, I'm Dave Winter, I'm project director of the connected learning community in Hamilton, New Zealand. 

Today I want to talk about three things that I think are really important in education today. Particularly in our country it is quite exciting at the moment because we have got the ultrafast fibre rollout but we've got to manage that change. The good thing is that we've got some strategies for change now, we're all slightly more familiar with it. The next thing I want to talk about is digital society, and the final thing I want to talk about is teaching as inquiry and professional learning communities as a way to build this up.

So in terms of the ultrafast fibre, one group of schools who've been really struggling until now with broadband access is secondary schools. They've got more students and they haven't really had a pathway through that sort of bottleneck. Now they've got that bottleneck is going to be solved for them, it's all pretty affordable so I think people are going to jump on board. But we've still got to manage the change because it means our schools are going to change. And I just wanted to reference a couple things about change that we are more familiar with now. The idea that within change we've got culture, we've got people, and we've got processes. So we need to be working on all those levels. And we've got some neat tools now too. So we've got the elearning planning framework coming out from the Ministry and we've also got the educational positioning system from Derek Wenmoth and Julia Atkin. And if we can apply those tools or look at culture and processes and people as well as just the technicality of managing change we will be in a better position.

The second thing I would like to talk about is digital society. Now I've been fortunate enough to work in a school where the students have had their own devices now for four years. I always thought the most important thing was we were going to be able to extend our learning out from the school and really get into those students' homes. The funny thing is, I have come to realise that it's not just about that, it is actually a two way street. When the students come in with their devices they are bringing in their ideas, what they're trying, their hopes and dreams as well. And we've got to sort of meet those two things together. We have a lot of people realising that digital citizenship is right in the very centre and the very heart of this learning that people are going to be doing, especially within the bring your own device or one to one environment. What I think we also need to realise is that digital citizenship is not just for students, it's not something that we want them to be, it is for our whole society. So we've got to make sure we are making moves for our own digital citizenship for our own understanding of our digital footprint, and for our own development of our digital capability. We've just got to invest a little bit of time into this and people have got some great ways of being successful with this now. We have seen all the professional and personal learning networks that have developed, they're fantastic.

At the moment I'm conducting a very small inquiry into the use of computer programming software, a bit geeky I know, but to look at geometry in maths, to explore geometry in maths. But when I've conducted my inquiry, when I have some student voice, when I have some understanding of what students have achieved, I need to then be able to bring that back to a wider group so that they too can understand and jump past base one. And I think this needs to happen at a number of levels. It needs to happen at a global level and it does, it needs to happen at a national level and it does. I think we really need to start pushing this at a local, slightly more regional level, which is where this project that I'm involved in and this community I'm involved in comes in. 

If we get people who have the opportunity to regularly meet face to face to perhaps become friends in both the online world and the offline world, the greatest opportunity for that happens at a local level. And right at the bottom of that in some ways, and also at the top of that, is within our schools. So let's make sure that within our schools we've got lots of people conducting inquiries into learning and sharing that with each other. 

Hello everyone, I'm Dave Winter, I'm project director of the connected learning community in Hamilton, New Zealand. 

Today I want to talk about three things that I think are really important in education today. Particularly in our country it is quite exciting at the moment because we have got the ultrafast fibre rollout but we've got to manage that change. The good thing is that we've got some strategies for change now, we're all slightly more familiar with it. The next thing I want to talk about is digital society, and the final thing I want to talk about is teaching as inquiry and professional learning communities as a way to build this up.

So in terms of the ultrafast fibre, one group of schools who've been really struggling until now with broadband access is secondary schools. They've got more students and they haven't really had a pathway through that sort of bottleneck. Now they've got that bottleneck is going to be solved for them, it's all pretty affordable so I think people are going to jump on board. But we've still got to manage the change because it means our schools are going to change. And I just wanted to reference a couple things about change that we are more familiar with now. The idea that within change we've got culture, we've got people, and we've got processes. So we need to be working on all those levels. And we've got some neat tools now too. So we've got the elearning planning framework coming out from the Ministry and we've also got the educational positioning system from Derek Wenmoth and Julia Atkin. And if we can apply those tools or look at culture and processes and people as well as just the technicality of managing change we will be in a better position.

The second thing I would like to talk about is digital society. Now I've been fortunate enough to work in a school where the students have had their own devices now for four years. I always thought the most important thing was we were going to be able to extend our learning out from the school and really get into those students' homes. The funny thing is, I have come to realise that it's not just about that, it is actually a two way street. When the students come in with their devices they are bringing in their ideas, what they're trying, their hopes and dreams as well. And we've got to sort of meet those two things together. We have a lot of people realising that digital citizenship is right in the very centre and the very heart of this learning that people are going to be doing, especially within the bring your own device or one to one environment. What I think we also need to realise is that digital citizenship is not just for students, it's not something that we want them to be, it is for our whole society. So we've got to make sure we are making moves for our own digital citizenship for our own understanding of our digital footprint, and for our own development of our digital capability. We've just got to invest a little bit of time into this and people have got some great ways of being successful with this now. We have seen all the professional and personal learning networks that have developed, they're fantastic.

At the moment I'm conducting a very small inquiry into the use of computer programming software, a bit geeky I know, but to look at geometry in maths, to explore geometry in maths. But when I've conducted my inquiry, when I have some student voice, when I have some understanding of what students have achieved, I need to then be able to bring that back to a wider group so that they too can understand and jump past base one. And I think this needs to happen at a number of levels. It needs to happen at a global level and it does, it needs to happen at a national level and it does. I think we really need to start pushing this at a local, slightly more regional level, which is where this project that I'm involved in and this community I'm involved in comes in. 

If we get people who have the opportunity to regularly meet face to face to perhaps become friends in both the online world and the offline world, the greatest opportunity for that happens at a local level. And right at the bottom of that in some ways, and also at the top of that, is within our schools. So let's make sure that within our schools we've got lots of people conducting inquiries into learning and sharing that with each other. 

Date added: 12/12/2012

Dave Winter mentions the following tools for managing change in our schools:

Elearning planning framework 

Educational positioning system

 

Dave was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

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