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You can find out more on the Hingaia Peninsula School website

Stephanie, Shaun, and Donna were speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

You can find out more on the Hingaia Peninsula School website

Stephanie, Shaun, and Donna were speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

Speaker: Hingaia Peninsula School

Stephanie, Shaun, and Donna teach together in a studio at Hingaia Peninsula School in Auckland. They explain the benefits and the challenges of working collaboratively for themselves as professionals, and for the students in their care.

Views 26,116
Date added: 11 Jan 2013
Duration:

Nāu te rourou nāku te rourou ka ora ai te iwi.

With my food basket and your food basket, the people will thrive. And that's what collaboration is.

Collaborative teaching is what we do. Collaboration is not just working together, it's about working together to create something that's more than you could do on your own, and sharing responsibility. Certainly what it looks like in our studio in our school is the three of us sharing a teaching space, sharing gardenship for all of the students in their learning and their social wellfare and planning together, teaching together and sharing the responsibility for the learning and the of the students and of ourselves.

The benefits are twofolds, both for the students and for us as teachers. One of the things that has been a benefit for us is that we've been having PD all the time just by watching our colleagues in our class. How they teach, how they interact with the students, and what they're teaching the kids. And we often steal ideas off each other and go "that was really good". And that has led us to be able to affirm some of the good things we have in our own practice, but what we have in the other teacher's practice as well, so it's been really good

And we often give each other advice when we get stuck like that. So if we get stuck with an issue or student we've got two other teachers to jump in and offer advice and (three heads are better than one). Yes three heads are better than one, absolutely.

And the students are relishing being able to go to the teacher that they know are perhaps more into music or more into the creative arts and they really feed off being able to take their learning to the person who is most appropriate for that piece of learning that they are doing.

I think the benefits don't stop there, the benefits for us as being able to plan and teach together and support each other gives us so much more confidence in ourselves as professionals and teachers.

You have that daily affirmation that what you're doing is good and that the students are learning and you are doing the best thing for their learning, because you have other people backing you up. It's not just you thinking, it's all three of you and you know there is a real strength in that approach or in that pedagogy or in that way of teaching and grouping the students.

It's constant reflective conversations and professional development conversations that really make it work.

There are lots of stumbles along the way. You have to be a risk taker as a teacher, you've got to be willing to give over ownership and hold your ideas lightly so that they can be modified, enhanced, to make it better for the student, not necessarily for the way you like to teach.

Some of the stumbles we've found is that you've got to have good structure, if you don't then things fall about. You've got to have good communication with each other, it is building a relationship, not just working together.

It is a bit like flatting, sometimes it is just "You just actually need to do the dishes" and you've got to have those conversations about working together and sharing that space, and that can be difficult at times, but that's some of the things we've had to work through.

Absolutely, we call that open learning conversations and we've found that has been the basis for our collaboration. Collaborative teaching is having good communication, good structure and doing it regularly.

And that real high trust that is developed among us is really important as well, and if you don't have that, that's where you can start falling into a bit of a pit because you've got to trust your colleagues, you've got to trust their opinions as well as your own opinions.

Nāu te rourou nāku te rourou ka ora ai te iwi.

With my food basket and your food basket, the people will thrive. And that's what collaboration is.

Collaborative teaching is what we do. Collaboration is not just working together, it's about working together to create something that's more than you could do on your own, and sharing responsibility. Certainly what it looks like in our studio in our school is the three of us sharing a teaching space, sharing gardenship for all of the students in their learning and their social wellfare and planning together, teaching together and sharing the responsibility for the learning and the of the students and of ourselves.

The benefits are twofolds, both for the students and for us as teachers. One of the things that has been a benefit for us is that we've been having PD all the time just by watching our colleagues in our class. How they teach, how they interact with the students, and what they're teaching the kids. And we often steal ideas off each other and go "that was really good". And that has led us to be able to affirm some of the good things we have in our own practice, but what we have in the other teacher's practice as well, so it's been really good

And we often give each other advice when we get stuck like that. So if we get stuck with an issue or student we've got two other teachers to jump in and offer advice and (three heads are better than one). Yes three heads are better than one, absolutely.

And the students are relishing being able to go to the teacher that they know are perhaps more into music or more into the creative arts and they really feed off being able to take their learning to the person who is most appropriate for that piece of learning that they are doing.

I think the benefits don't stop there, the benefits for us as being able to plan and teach together and support each other gives us so much more confidence in ourselves as professionals and teachers.

You have that daily affirmation that what you're doing is good and that the students are learning and you are doing the best thing for their learning, because you have other people backing you up. It's not just you thinking, it's all three of you and you know there is a real strength in that approach or in that pedagogy or in that way of teaching and grouping the students.

It's constant reflective conversations and professional development conversations that really make it work.

There are lots of stumbles along the way. You have to be a risk taker as a teacher, you've got to be willing to give over ownership and hold your ideas lightly so that they can be modified, enhanced, to make it better for the student, not necessarily for the way you like to teach.

Some of the stumbles we've found is that you've got to have good structure, if you don't then things fall about. You've got to have good communication with each other, it is building a relationship, not just working together.

It is a bit like flatting, sometimes it is just "You just actually need to do the dishes" and you've got to have those conversations about working together and sharing that space, and that can be difficult at times, but that's some of the things we've had to work through.

Absolutely, we call that open learning conversations and we've found that has been the basis for our collaboration. Collaborative teaching is having good communication, good structure and doing it regularly.

And that real high trust that is developed among us is really important as well, and if you don't have that, that's where you can start falling into a bit of a pit because you've got to trust your colleagues, you've got to trust their opinions as well as your own opinions.

Date added: 01/11/2013

Co-operative and collaborative teaching

Stephanie, Shaun, and Donna teach together in a studio at Hingaia Peninsula School in Auckland. They explain the benefits and the challenges of working collaboratively for themselves as professionals, and for the students in their care.

Views 26,116 Date added: 11/01/2013

Co-operative and collaborative teaching

Nāu te rourou nāku te rourou ka ora ai te iwi.

With my food basket and your food basket, the people will thrive. And that's what collaboration is.

Collaborative teaching is what we do. Collaboration is not just working together, it's about working together to create something that's more than you could do on your own, and sharing responsibility. Certainly what it looks like in our studio in our school is the three of us sharing a teaching space, sharing gardenship for all of the students in their learning and their social wellfare and planning together, teaching together and sharing the responsibility for the learning and the of the students and of ourselves.

The benefits are twofolds, both for the students and for us as teachers. One of the things that has been a benefit for us is that we've been having PD all the time just by watching our colleagues in our class. How they teach, how they interact with the students, and what they're teaching the kids. And we often steal ideas off each other and go "that was really good". And that has led us to be able to affirm some of the good things we have in our own practice, but what we have in the other teacher's practice as well, so it's been really good

And we often give each other advice when we get stuck like that. So if we get stuck with an issue or student we've got two other teachers to jump in and offer advice and (three heads are better than one). Yes three heads are better than one, absolutely.

And the students are relishing being able to go to the teacher that they know are perhaps more into music or more into the creative arts and they really feed off being able to take their learning to the person who is most appropriate for that piece of learning that they are doing.

I think the benefits don't stop there, the benefits for us as being able to plan and teach together and support each other gives us so much more confidence in ourselves as professionals and teachers.

You have that daily affirmation that what you're doing is good and that the students are learning and you are doing the best thing for their learning, because you have other people backing you up. It's not just you thinking, it's all three of you and you know there is a real strength in that approach or in that pedagogy or in that way of teaching and grouping the students.

It's constant reflective conversations and professional development conversations that really make it work.

There are lots of stumbles along the way. You have to be a risk taker as a teacher, you've got to be willing to give over ownership and hold your ideas lightly so that they can be modified, enhanced, to make it better for the student, not necessarily for the way you like to teach.

Some of the stumbles we've found is that you've got to have good structure, if you don't then things fall about. You've got to have good communication with each other, it is building a relationship, not just working together.

It is a bit like flatting, sometimes it is just "You just actually need to do the dishes" and you've got to have those conversations about working together and sharing that space, and that can be difficult at times, but that's some of the things we've had to work through.

Absolutely, we call that open learning conversations and we've found that has been the basis for our collaboration. Collaborative teaching is having good communication, good structure and doing it regularly.

And that real high trust that is developed among us is really important as well, and if you don't have that, that's where you can start falling into a bit of a pit because you've got to trust your colleagues, you've got to trust their opinions as well as your own opinions.

Nāu te rourou nāku te rourou ka ora ai te iwi.

With my food basket and your food basket, the people will thrive. And that's what collaboration is.

Collaborative teaching is what we do. Collaboration is not just working together, it's about working together to create something that's more than you could do on your own, and sharing responsibility. Certainly what it looks like in our studio in our school is the three of us sharing a teaching space, sharing gardenship for all of the students in their learning and their social wellfare and planning together, teaching together and sharing the responsibility for the learning and the of the students and of ourselves.

The benefits are twofolds, both for the students and for us as teachers. One of the things that has been a benefit for us is that we've been having PD all the time just by watching our colleagues in our class. How they teach, how they interact with the students, and what they're teaching the kids. And we often steal ideas off each other and go "that was really good". And that has led us to be able to affirm some of the good things we have in our own practice, but what we have in the other teacher's practice as well, so it's been really good

And we often give each other advice when we get stuck like that. So if we get stuck with an issue or student we've got two other teachers to jump in and offer advice and (three heads are better than one). Yes three heads are better than one, absolutely.

And the students are relishing being able to go to the teacher that they know are perhaps more into music or more into the creative arts and they really feed off being able to take their learning to the person who is most appropriate for that piece of learning that they are doing.

I think the benefits don't stop there, the benefits for us as being able to plan and teach together and support each other gives us so much more confidence in ourselves as professionals and teachers.

You have that daily affirmation that what you're doing is good and that the students are learning and you are doing the best thing for their learning, because you have other people backing you up. It's not just you thinking, it's all three of you and you know there is a real strength in that approach or in that pedagogy or in that way of teaching and grouping the students.

It's constant reflective conversations and professional development conversations that really make it work.

There are lots of stumbles along the way. You have to be a risk taker as a teacher, you've got to be willing to give over ownership and hold your ideas lightly so that they can be modified, enhanced, to make it better for the student, not necessarily for the way you like to teach.

Some of the stumbles we've found is that you've got to have good structure, if you don't then things fall about. You've got to have good communication with each other, it is building a relationship, not just working together.

It is a bit like flatting, sometimes it is just "You just actually need to do the dishes" and you've got to have those conversations about working together and sharing that space, and that can be difficult at times, but that's some of the things we've had to work through.

Absolutely, we call that open learning conversations and we've found that has been the basis for our collaboration. Collaborative teaching is having good communication, good structure and doing it regularly.

And that real high trust that is developed among us is really important as well, and if you don't have that, that's where you can start falling into a bit of a pit because you've got to trust your colleagues, you've got to trust their opinions as well as your own opinions.

Date added: 11/01/2013

Co-operative and collaborative teaching

Stephanie, Shaun, and Donna teach together in a studio at Hingaia Peninsula School in Auckland. They explain the benefits and the challenges of working collaboratively for themselves as professionals, and for the students in their care.

Views 26,116 Date added: 11/01/2013

Co-operative and collaborative teaching

Nāu te rourou nāku te rourou ka ora ai te iwi.

With my food basket and your food basket, the people will thrive. And that's what collaboration is.

Collaborative teaching is what we do. Collaboration is not just working together, it's about working together to create something that's more than you could do on your own, and sharing responsibility. Certainly what it looks like in our studio in our school is the three of us sharing a teaching space, sharing gardenship for all of the students in their learning and their social wellfare and planning together, teaching together and sharing the responsibility for the learning and the of the students and of ourselves.

The benefits are twofolds, both for the students and for us as teachers. One of the things that has been a benefit for us is that we've been having PD all the time just by watching our colleagues in our class. How they teach, how they interact with the students, and what they're teaching the kids. And we often steal ideas off each other and go "that was really good". And that has led us to be able to affirm some of the good things we have in our own practice, but what we have in the other teacher's practice as well, so it's been really good

And we often give each other advice when we get stuck like that. So if we get stuck with an issue or student we've got two other teachers to jump in and offer advice and (three heads are better than one). Yes three heads are better than one, absolutely.

And the students are relishing being able to go to the teacher that they know are perhaps more into music or more into the creative arts and they really feed off being able to take their learning to the person who is most appropriate for that piece of learning that they are doing.

I think the benefits don't stop there, the benefits for us as being able to plan and teach together and support each other gives us so much more confidence in ourselves as professionals and teachers.

You have that daily affirmation that what you're doing is good and that the students are learning and you are doing the best thing for their learning, because you have other people backing you up. It's not just you thinking, it's all three of you and you know there is a real strength in that approach or in that pedagogy or in that way of teaching and grouping the students.

It's constant reflective conversations and professional development conversations that really make it work.

There are lots of stumbles along the way. You have to be a risk taker as a teacher, you've got to be willing to give over ownership and hold your ideas lightly so that they can be modified, enhanced, to make it better for the student, not necessarily for the way you like to teach.

Some of the stumbles we've found is that you've got to have good structure, if you don't then things fall about. You've got to have good communication with each other, it is building a relationship, not just working together.

It is a bit like flatting, sometimes it is just "You just actually need to do the dishes" and you've got to have those conversations about working together and sharing that space, and that can be difficult at times, but that's some of the things we've had to work through.

Absolutely, we call that open learning conversations and we've found that has been the basis for our collaboration. Collaborative teaching is having good communication, good structure and doing it regularly.

And that real high trust that is developed among us is really important as well, and if you don't have that, that's where you can start falling into a bit of a pit because you've got to trust your colleagues, you've got to trust their opinions as well as your own opinions.

Nāu te rourou nāku te rourou ka ora ai te iwi.

With my food basket and your food basket, the people will thrive. And that's what collaboration is.

Collaborative teaching is what we do. Collaboration is not just working together, it's about working together to create something that's more than you could do on your own, and sharing responsibility. Certainly what it looks like in our studio in our school is the three of us sharing a teaching space, sharing gardenship for all of the students in their learning and their social wellfare and planning together, teaching together and sharing the responsibility for the learning and the of the students and of ourselves.

The benefits are twofolds, both for the students and for us as teachers. One of the things that has been a benefit for us is that we've been having PD all the time just by watching our colleagues in our class. How they teach, how they interact with the students, and what they're teaching the kids. And we often steal ideas off each other and go "that was really good". And that has led us to be able to affirm some of the good things we have in our own practice, but what we have in the other teacher's practice as well, so it's been really good

And we often give each other advice when we get stuck like that. So if we get stuck with an issue or student we've got two other teachers to jump in and offer advice and (three heads are better than one). Yes three heads are better than one, absolutely.

And the students are relishing being able to go to the teacher that they know are perhaps more into music or more into the creative arts and they really feed off being able to take their learning to the person who is most appropriate for that piece of learning that they are doing.

I think the benefits don't stop there, the benefits for us as being able to plan and teach together and support each other gives us so much more confidence in ourselves as professionals and teachers.

You have that daily affirmation that what you're doing is good and that the students are learning and you are doing the best thing for their learning, because you have other people backing you up. It's not just you thinking, it's all three of you and you know there is a real strength in that approach or in that pedagogy or in that way of teaching and grouping the students.

It's constant reflective conversations and professional development conversations that really make it work.

There are lots of stumbles along the way. You have to be a risk taker as a teacher, you've got to be willing to give over ownership and hold your ideas lightly so that they can be modified, enhanced, to make it better for the student, not necessarily for the way you like to teach.

Some of the stumbles we've found is that you've got to have good structure, if you don't then things fall about. You've got to have good communication with each other, it is building a relationship, not just working together.

It is a bit like flatting, sometimes it is just "You just actually need to do the dishes" and you've got to have those conversations about working together and sharing that space, and that can be difficult at times, but that's some of the things we've had to work through.

Absolutely, we call that open learning conversations and we've found that has been the basis for our collaboration. Collaborative teaching is having good communication, good structure and doing it regularly.

And that real high trust that is developed among us is really important as well, and if you don't have that, that's where you can start falling into a bit of a pit because you've got to trust your colleagues, you've got to trust their opinions as well as your own opinions.

Date added: 11/01/2013

You can find out more on the Hingaia Peninsula School website

Stephanie, Shaun, and Donna were speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

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