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You can view some of the movies on the Flick-It-On! blog

Emma Watts is a CORE Education eFellow. You can access all her resources on her eFellow wikispace

Emma was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

You can view some of the movies on the Flick-It-On! blog

Emma Watts is a CORE Education eFellow. You can access all her resources on her eFellow wikispace

Emma was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

Speaker: Emma Watts

Emma Watts tells us about the 'flick it on' film making challenge. In this challenge one film is made through the collaboration of four schools. Emma explains how this works. 

Views 21,328
Date added: 9 Jan 2013
Duration: 5:18

Hello, my name's Emma Watts and I'm the lead elearning teacher at Upper Moutere School in Nelson. 

I'm going to tell you all about the Flick it on film making project which is a collaborative film making project that I've been working on alongside with other teachers in the region as well. We started off as part of the Wakatu Cluster and we were given some money to put into projects that would be great for teacher professional learning development and also for getting the kids on board and doing lots of really fun elearning things in the classroom.

We started off with seven different schools and initially we started doing a three day film festival. But we wanted to make the three day film festival more sustainable. Our next challenge was how can we make it more sustainable without having to spend lots of money getting teachers and students together in one place. 

So a group of us came up with the idea of flick it on, which means students can actually be collaborating with students from other schools making a film and flicking it on to the next rotation.

So what that entails is each classroom is involved with four other classrooms from four other schools and there are four rotations. The very first rotation is students creating what we call a silent movie. So they do the storyboarding, they talk about what they want their story to be about and they have to make the silent movie acting it out. And they can be any film that they wanted. So it could be animated, it could be traditional films, using green screening, what ever way they want to do. 

And after they have finished that, after about a three week process they then flick it on to the next school. And so if you think about four different schools, each school flicking it on, you send your movie on to the next school and then you get somebody elses silent movie. And the really fun part of it is that you have to then interpret that movie. And that is the next rotation, rotation two. And in rotation two you interpret the movie, you watch it several times and then you have to do the voice over and all the sound effects. So you could actually interpret it quite differently to what the original team decided. So we have two weeks for that part. So your script writing, you have all the normal literacy things that you are doing in your classroom. And then you flick that on. And it goes around the circle one more time.

So then what happens in round three or rotation three is that we then have to add on music to create emotions and feelings within the movie. So again we have a new movie that was a silent movie that has had voice and sound effects and we have to watch it and interpret that again and decide what kind of music is going to be a great background or a soundtrack for the movie. 

And then, when we finish that after two weeks, we then flick it round again. And the very final part is we put on titles and we put on the credits and finish it off and send it back. And then we actually have a premiere at the end of it where all the students get together in a, usually a school hall. We've done it at various different places over the three years that we have been running it, and we celebrate and we have a premiere and we watch it and the students get to share their movies and see all the different, because all together they would have probably worked on four different movies and collaborated on it, so it's a really great kind of collaboration, learning process that the students are going through. Learning lots of literacy outcomes. There's lots of talking, there's lots of writing and also all that visual literacy that's so important in today's society with all the media that the students are kind of exposed to. It's really great to get them thinking with those different literacies. It's really a fantastic project.

I think the big thing that people can learn from the project is that anyone can make movies. It doesn't have to be a fancy polished off kind of Steven Speilberg amazing, it's all about the taking part and it's all about learning about those different types of literacies within the classroom and putting it into classroom practice and having some fun. And I think if students are having fun as they are learning then their learning is so much more incidentally alongside having this fun and making a great project. 

And we are actually looking now to kind of collaborate with people wider, outside of the Nelson and Tasman region now, so we are really looking for other people to get involved. So please get in touch if you would like to have fun and flick some movies on with some other students from New Zealand. 

Hello, my name's Emma Watts and I'm the lead elearning teacher at Upper Moutere School in Nelson. 

I'm going to tell you all about the Flick it on film making project which is a collaborative film making project that I've been working on alongside with other teachers in the region as well. We started off as part of the Wakatu Cluster and we were given some money to put into projects that would be great for teacher professional learning development and also for getting the kids on board and doing lots of really fun elearning things in the classroom.

We started off with seven different schools and initially we started doing a three day film festival. But we wanted to make the three day film festival more sustainable. Our next challenge was how can we make it more sustainable without having to spend lots of money getting teachers and students together in one place. 

So a group of us came up with the idea of flick it on, which means students can actually be collaborating with students from other schools making a film and flicking it on to the next rotation.

So what that entails is each classroom is involved with four other classrooms from four other schools and there are four rotations. The very first rotation is students creating what we call a silent movie. So they do the storyboarding, they talk about what they want their story to be about and they have to make the silent movie acting it out. And they can be any film that they wanted. So it could be animated, it could be traditional films, using green screening, what ever way they want to do. 

And after they have finished that, after about a three week process they then flick it on to the next school. And so if you think about four different schools, each school flicking it on, you send your movie on to the next school and then you get somebody elses silent movie. And the really fun part of it is that you have to then interpret that movie. And that is the next rotation, rotation two. And in rotation two you interpret the movie, you watch it several times and then you have to do the voice over and all the sound effects. So you could actually interpret it quite differently to what the original team decided. So we have two weeks for that part. So your script writing, you have all the normal literacy things that you are doing in your classroom. And then you flick that on. And it goes around the circle one more time.

So then what happens in round three or rotation three is that we then have to add on music to create emotions and feelings within the movie. So again we have a new movie that was a silent movie that has had voice and sound effects and we have to watch it and interpret that again and decide what kind of music is going to be a great background or a soundtrack for the movie. 

And then, when we finish that after two weeks, we then flick it round again. And the very final part is we put on titles and we put on the credits and finish it off and send it back. And then we actually have a premiere at the end of it where all the students get together in a, usually a school hall. We've done it at various different places over the three years that we have been running it, and we celebrate and we have a premiere and we watch it and the students get to share their movies and see all the different, because all together they would have probably worked on four different movies and collaborated on it, so it's a really great kind of collaboration, learning process that the students are going through. Learning lots of literacy outcomes. There's lots of talking, there's lots of writing and also all that visual literacy that's so important in today's society with all the media that the students are kind of exposed to. It's really great to get them thinking with those different literacies. It's really a fantastic project.

I think the big thing that people can learn from the project is that anyone can make movies. It doesn't have to be a fancy polished off kind of Steven Speilberg amazing, it's all about the taking part and it's all about learning about those different types of literacies within the classroom and putting it into classroom practice and having some fun. And I think if students are having fun as they are learning then their learning is so much more incidentally alongside having this fun and making a great project. 

And we are actually looking now to kind of collaborate with people wider, outside of the Nelson and Tasman region now, so we are really looking for other people to get involved. So please get in touch if you would like to have fun and flick some movies on with some other students from New Zealand. 

Date added: 01/09/2013

Collaborative student film making challenge

Emma Watts tells us about the 'flick it on' film making challenge. In this challenge one film is made through the collaboration of four schools. Emma explains how this works. 

Views 21,328 Date added: 09/01/2013

Collaborative student film making challenge

Hello, my name's Emma Watts and I'm the lead elearning teacher at Upper Moutere School in Nelson. 

I'm going to tell you all about the Flick it on film making project which is a collaborative film making project that I've been working on alongside with other teachers in the region as well. We started off as part of the Wakatu Cluster and we were given some money to put into projects that would be great for teacher professional learning development and also for getting the kids on board and doing lots of really fun elearning things in the classroom.

We started off with seven different schools and initially we started doing a three day film festival. But we wanted to make the three day film festival more sustainable. Our next challenge was how can we make it more sustainable without having to spend lots of money getting teachers and students together in one place. 

So a group of us came up with the idea of flick it on, which means students can actually be collaborating with students from other schools making a film and flicking it on to the next rotation.

So what that entails is each classroom is involved with four other classrooms from four other schools and there are four rotations. The very first rotation is students creating what we call a silent movie. So they do the storyboarding, they talk about what they want their story to be about and they have to make the silent movie acting it out. And they can be any film that they wanted. So it could be animated, it could be traditional films, using green screening, what ever way they want to do. 

And after they have finished that, after about a three week process they then flick it on to the next school. And so if you think about four different schools, each school flicking it on, you send your movie on to the next school and then you get somebody elses silent movie. And the really fun part of it is that you have to then interpret that movie. And that is the next rotation, rotation two. And in rotation two you interpret the movie, you watch it several times and then you have to do the voice over and all the sound effects. So you could actually interpret it quite differently to what the original team decided. So we have two weeks for that part. So your script writing, you have all the normal literacy things that you are doing in your classroom. And then you flick that on. And it goes around the circle one more time.

So then what happens in round three or rotation three is that we then have to add on music to create emotions and feelings within the movie. So again we have a new movie that was a silent movie that has had voice and sound effects and we have to watch it and interpret that again and decide what kind of music is going to be a great background or a soundtrack for the movie. 

And then, when we finish that after two weeks, we then flick it round again. And the very final part is we put on titles and we put on the credits and finish it off and send it back. And then we actually have a premiere at the end of it where all the students get together in a, usually a school hall. We've done it at various different places over the three years that we have been running it, and we celebrate and we have a premiere and we watch it and the students get to share their movies and see all the different, because all together they would have probably worked on four different movies and collaborated on it, so it's a really great kind of collaboration, learning process that the students are going through. Learning lots of literacy outcomes. There's lots of talking, there's lots of writing and also all that visual literacy that's so important in today's society with all the media that the students are kind of exposed to. It's really great to get them thinking with those different literacies. It's really a fantastic project.

I think the big thing that people can learn from the project is that anyone can make movies. It doesn't have to be a fancy polished off kind of Steven Speilberg amazing, it's all about the taking part and it's all about learning about those different types of literacies within the classroom and putting it into classroom practice and having some fun. And I think if students are having fun as they are learning then their learning is so much more incidentally alongside having this fun and making a great project. 

And we are actually looking now to kind of collaborate with people wider, outside of the Nelson and Tasman region now, so we are really looking for other people to get involved. So please get in touch if you would like to have fun and flick some movies on with some other students from New Zealand. 

Hello, my name's Emma Watts and I'm the lead elearning teacher at Upper Moutere School in Nelson. 

I'm going to tell you all about the Flick it on film making project which is a collaborative film making project that I've been working on alongside with other teachers in the region as well. We started off as part of the Wakatu Cluster and we were given some money to put into projects that would be great for teacher professional learning development and also for getting the kids on board and doing lots of really fun elearning things in the classroom.

We started off with seven different schools and initially we started doing a three day film festival. But we wanted to make the three day film festival more sustainable. Our next challenge was how can we make it more sustainable without having to spend lots of money getting teachers and students together in one place. 

So a group of us came up with the idea of flick it on, which means students can actually be collaborating with students from other schools making a film and flicking it on to the next rotation.

So what that entails is each classroom is involved with four other classrooms from four other schools and there are four rotations. The very first rotation is students creating what we call a silent movie. So they do the storyboarding, they talk about what they want their story to be about and they have to make the silent movie acting it out. And they can be any film that they wanted. So it could be animated, it could be traditional films, using green screening, what ever way they want to do. 

And after they have finished that, after about a three week process they then flick it on to the next school. And so if you think about four different schools, each school flicking it on, you send your movie on to the next school and then you get somebody elses silent movie. And the really fun part of it is that you have to then interpret that movie. And that is the next rotation, rotation two. And in rotation two you interpret the movie, you watch it several times and then you have to do the voice over and all the sound effects. So you could actually interpret it quite differently to what the original team decided. So we have two weeks for that part. So your script writing, you have all the normal literacy things that you are doing in your classroom. And then you flick that on. And it goes around the circle one more time.

So then what happens in round three or rotation three is that we then have to add on music to create emotions and feelings within the movie. So again we have a new movie that was a silent movie that has had voice and sound effects and we have to watch it and interpret that again and decide what kind of music is going to be a great background or a soundtrack for the movie. 

And then, when we finish that after two weeks, we then flick it round again. And the very final part is we put on titles and we put on the credits and finish it off and send it back. And then we actually have a premiere at the end of it where all the students get together in a, usually a school hall. We've done it at various different places over the three years that we have been running it, and we celebrate and we have a premiere and we watch it and the students get to share their movies and see all the different, because all together they would have probably worked on four different movies and collaborated on it, so it's a really great kind of collaboration, learning process that the students are going through. Learning lots of literacy outcomes. There's lots of talking, there's lots of writing and also all that visual literacy that's so important in today's society with all the media that the students are kind of exposed to. It's really great to get them thinking with those different literacies. It's really a fantastic project.

I think the big thing that people can learn from the project is that anyone can make movies. It doesn't have to be a fancy polished off kind of Steven Speilberg amazing, it's all about the taking part and it's all about learning about those different types of literacies within the classroom and putting it into classroom practice and having some fun. And I think if students are having fun as they are learning then their learning is so much more incidentally alongside having this fun and making a great project. 

And we are actually looking now to kind of collaborate with people wider, outside of the Nelson and Tasman region now, so we are really looking for other people to get involved. So please get in touch if you would like to have fun and flick some movies on with some other students from New Zealand. 

Date added: 09/01/2013

Collaborative student film making challenge

Emma Watts tells us about the 'flick it on' film making challenge. In this challenge one film is made through the collaboration of four schools. Emma explains how this works. 

Views 21,328 Date added: 09/01/2013

Collaborative student film making challenge

Hello, my name's Emma Watts and I'm the lead elearning teacher at Upper Moutere School in Nelson. 

I'm going to tell you all about the Flick it on film making project which is a collaborative film making project that I've been working on alongside with other teachers in the region as well. We started off as part of the Wakatu Cluster and we were given some money to put into projects that would be great for teacher professional learning development and also for getting the kids on board and doing lots of really fun elearning things in the classroom.

We started off with seven different schools and initially we started doing a three day film festival. But we wanted to make the three day film festival more sustainable. Our next challenge was how can we make it more sustainable without having to spend lots of money getting teachers and students together in one place. 

So a group of us came up with the idea of flick it on, which means students can actually be collaborating with students from other schools making a film and flicking it on to the next rotation.

So what that entails is each classroom is involved with four other classrooms from four other schools and there are four rotations. The very first rotation is students creating what we call a silent movie. So they do the storyboarding, they talk about what they want their story to be about and they have to make the silent movie acting it out. And they can be any film that they wanted. So it could be animated, it could be traditional films, using green screening, what ever way they want to do. 

And after they have finished that, after about a three week process they then flick it on to the next school. And so if you think about four different schools, each school flicking it on, you send your movie on to the next school and then you get somebody elses silent movie. And the really fun part of it is that you have to then interpret that movie. And that is the next rotation, rotation two. And in rotation two you interpret the movie, you watch it several times and then you have to do the voice over and all the sound effects. So you could actually interpret it quite differently to what the original team decided. So we have two weeks for that part. So your script writing, you have all the normal literacy things that you are doing in your classroom. And then you flick that on. And it goes around the circle one more time.

So then what happens in round three or rotation three is that we then have to add on music to create emotions and feelings within the movie. So again we have a new movie that was a silent movie that has had voice and sound effects and we have to watch it and interpret that again and decide what kind of music is going to be a great background or a soundtrack for the movie. 

And then, when we finish that after two weeks, we then flick it round again. And the very final part is we put on titles and we put on the credits and finish it off and send it back. And then we actually have a premiere at the end of it where all the students get together in a, usually a school hall. We've done it at various different places over the three years that we have been running it, and we celebrate and we have a premiere and we watch it and the students get to share their movies and see all the different, because all together they would have probably worked on four different movies and collaborated on it, so it's a really great kind of collaboration, learning process that the students are going through. Learning lots of literacy outcomes. There's lots of talking, there's lots of writing and also all that visual literacy that's so important in today's society with all the media that the students are kind of exposed to. It's really great to get them thinking with those different literacies. It's really a fantastic project.

I think the big thing that people can learn from the project is that anyone can make movies. It doesn't have to be a fancy polished off kind of Steven Speilberg amazing, it's all about the taking part and it's all about learning about those different types of literacies within the classroom and putting it into classroom practice and having some fun. And I think if students are having fun as they are learning then their learning is so much more incidentally alongside having this fun and making a great project. 

And we are actually looking now to kind of collaborate with people wider, outside of the Nelson and Tasman region now, so we are really looking for other people to get involved. So please get in touch if you would like to have fun and flick some movies on with some other students from New Zealand. 

Hello, my name's Emma Watts and I'm the lead elearning teacher at Upper Moutere School in Nelson. 

I'm going to tell you all about the Flick it on film making project which is a collaborative film making project that I've been working on alongside with other teachers in the region as well. We started off as part of the Wakatu Cluster and we were given some money to put into projects that would be great for teacher professional learning development and also for getting the kids on board and doing lots of really fun elearning things in the classroom.

We started off with seven different schools and initially we started doing a three day film festival. But we wanted to make the three day film festival more sustainable. Our next challenge was how can we make it more sustainable without having to spend lots of money getting teachers and students together in one place. 

So a group of us came up with the idea of flick it on, which means students can actually be collaborating with students from other schools making a film and flicking it on to the next rotation.

So what that entails is each classroom is involved with four other classrooms from four other schools and there are four rotations. The very first rotation is students creating what we call a silent movie. So they do the storyboarding, they talk about what they want their story to be about and they have to make the silent movie acting it out. And they can be any film that they wanted. So it could be animated, it could be traditional films, using green screening, what ever way they want to do. 

And after they have finished that, after about a three week process they then flick it on to the next school. And so if you think about four different schools, each school flicking it on, you send your movie on to the next school and then you get somebody elses silent movie. And the really fun part of it is that you have to then interpret that movie. And that is the next rotation, rotation two. And in rotation two you interpret the movie, you watch it several times and then you have to do the voice over and all the sound effects. So you could actually interpret it quite differently to what the original team decided. So we have two weeks for that part. So your script writing, you have all the normal literacy things that you are doing in your classroom. And then you flick that on. And it goes around the circle one more time.

So then what happens in round three or rotation three is that we then have to add on music to create emotions and feelings within the movie. So again we have a new movie that was a silent movie that has had voice and sound effects and we have to watch it and interpret that again and decide what kind of music is going to be a great background or a soundtrack for the movie. 

And then, when we finish that after two weeks, we then flick it round again. And the very final part is we put on titles and we put on the credits and finish it off and send it back. And then we actually have a premiere at the end of it where all the students get together in a, usually a school hall. We've done it at various different places over the three years that we have been running it, and we celebrate and we have a premiere and we watch it and the students get to share their movies and see all the different, because all together they would have probably worked on four different movies and collaborated on it, so it's a really great kind of collaboration, learning process that the students are going through. Learning lots of literacy outcomes. There's lots of talking, there's lots of writing and also all that visual literacy that's so important in today's society with all the media that the students are kind of exposed to. It's really great to get them thinking with those different literacies. It's really a fantastic project.

I think the big thing that people can learn from the project is that anyone can make movies. It doesn't have to be a fancy polished off kind of Steven Speilberg amazing, it's all about the taking part and it's all about learning about those different types of literacies within the classroom and putting it into classroom practice and having some fun. And I think if students are having fun as they are learning then their learning is so much more incidentally alongside having this fun and making a great project. 

And we are actually looking now to kind of collaborate with people wider, outside of the Nelson and Tasman region now, so we are really looking for other people to get involved. So please get in touch if you would like to have fun and flick some movies on with some other students from New Zealand. 

Date added: 09/01/2013

You can view some of the movies on the Flick-It-On! blog

Emma Watts is a CORE Education eFellow. You can access all her resources on her eFellow wikispace

Emma was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

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