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You can find out more about Glenn Capelli on his website 

Glenn was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

You can find out more about Glenn Capelli on his website 

Glenn was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Speaker: Glenn Capelli

Glenn Capelli was a keynote speaker at ULearn12. In this entertaining and inspirational talk he explores the layers of learning, how we create the environments that our young people need to really embrace learning and embrace thinking. He describes these layers as: philosophy, conversations, strategies, and methodology.

Views 18,545
Date added: 16 Jan 2013
Duration: 5:47

It's a delight to do the keynote for the ULearn conference and if there is a thing to be able to get across in a short period of time it would be to talk about the layers of learning, how we create the environments that our young people need to really embrace learning and embrace thinking.

The first layer is philosophy. So when I first went out teaching, my principal Glen Watkins at Wanneroo Senior High School, said "You've got to have a philosophy. What's your philosophy as a first year out teacher?" And I'm going, "What do you mean?" But he said "You don't have to tell me now but at the beginning of term four share your philosophy".

And really for me, I thought it through and I thought how was I taught a philosophy in life?  And my dad Jack, never says much, carpenter who left school very early, Jazz musician, 83 still speaks with a dry humour. And one day he got me and my brother and he said, "Boys, listen to this record". Now a record, as I explain is a circular black thing with a hole in the middle. So he put on a record and we were thinking it was going to be Jazz, but it was an old Tex Williams song, "Do what you do do well, boy, do what you do do well". So basically he was teaching us a philosophy. Whatever we're doing, give it our best shot. Whatever you're getting stuck into give it the best that you've got, whether it's sport, whether it's school whatever it is.

So what is the philosophy of your school? If your school was a song what song would it be? As a classroom teacher if there was a song that summed up your philosophy, and if not a song, a type of music, are you thrash metal, are you sort of even balanced. So the philosophy of education, the philosophy of educators. 

The next thing is the conversations. What kind of conversations are we having and what kind of conversations do our youngsters have? And one of the strategies I was teaching to people in terms of conversations is this one (performs sign language). So in signing for our deaf community, at least in Aus Land it would be "a little bit, a little bit, a little bit of improvement everyday". And that's the Japanese word Kaizen K A I Z E N. If you are spelling a word and you get it incorrect, instead of just marking it wrong count the letters that are correct and tick them. If a youngster gets three letters correct out of eight and then tomorrow gets seven letters correct out of eight. That's fantastic. That's a little bit of improvement everyday.

So what are the Kaizen things we can do as teacher? What are the Kaizen things, those tiny little nuances we can do to improve our teaching? And then linked to that is the Widezen - that it's not just enough to do what we're already doing a little bit better, we have to use some different crayons that we haven't used before because our young folk are going into a far more complex world. 

So we have philosophy, the kind of conversations and the openess and robust conversations we can have in schools, and then you get to strategies. 

One of my favourite strategies that I'll cover in the keynote are the Russian brothers and their cousin. The first Russian brother, his name is Moreov. so you simply look at all the good stuff that you're already doing that you can do a bit more of. What was good in that classroom? What's good in that essay that the student can do a bit more of? The second brother, Lessov. What does this essay need a bit less of? What do we need to stop doing, do a bit less of in terms of our schools? The third Russian brother, the most important one, Riddov. What do we need to stop doing? What needs to stop in the next essay this student writes? What do we need to get rid of in our schools, and I say that cynicism is one of the factors we need to shed. And the cousin, his name is Tossin. So what new things do we need to toss into the brew? 

So even the Russians can become a new strategy. Our conversation every month in the staff. What does the school need more of, less of, need to get rid of, new things to toss into the brew, what does that lesson need? So it is a less threatening way to do 360 degree feedback in many ways. 

The next layer is methodology. And it is not enough to just do a lecture, it never was enough. But we are now getting such a diverse range of students staying on in our schools right through the spectrum. Some of them used to leave early like my dad, now they're staying. And we need to reach them through physicality, physical learning whether it is signing or doing. Through visual aspects, so not just drawing pictures, but pictures that make sense added to words. So visual notetaking. It's not mindmapping, mindmapping is one visual strategy out of a 1000 that students can learn. But they need a whole stack of methodologies in their backpack, so rather than saying "oh this is boring I can't do it", to go "Okay, how can I turn this information, this stuff that is important, how can I turn it into learning so I own it?" And even our best students, so they're not just passing the exam but they have really got it in their heart and in their core of what it means to them.

So for all of those things, we're talking about a philosophy, we're talking about the kind of conversations in education, we're talking about the strategies, the Russians, we're talking about methodology. And finally flowing through it all are our systems. If we have a philosophy but our systems don't support it, if we believe in collaboration but we reward individual efforts, then collaboration is not going to catch on. To me it's really, for those four things at our core but have really good systems to be able to back it up, and that's the sort of stuff we wish for people in their schools and their communities. 

It's a delight to do the keynote for the ULearn conference and if there is a thing to be able to get across in a short period of time it would be to talk about the layers of learning, how we create the environments that our young people need to really embrace learning and embrace thinking.

The first layer is philosophy. So when I first went out teaching, my principal Glen Watkins at Wanneroo Senior High School, said "You've got to have a philosophy. What's your philosophy as a first year out teacher?" And I'm going, "What do you mean?" But he said "You don't have to tell me now but at the beginning of term four share your philosophy".

And really for me, I thought it through and I thought how was I taught a philosophy in life?  And my dad Jack, never says much, carpenter who left school very early, Jazz musician, 83 still speaks with a dry humour. And one day he got me and my brother and he said, "Boys, listen to this record". Now a record, as I explain is a circular black thing with a hole in the middle. So he put on a record and we were thinking it was going to be Jazz, but it was an old Tex Williams song, "Do what you do do well, boy, do what you do do well". So basically he was teaching us a philosophy. Whatever we're doing, give it our best shot. Whatever you're getting stuck into give it the best that you've got, whether it's sport, whether it's school whatever it is.

So what is the philosophy of your school? If your school was a song what song would it be? As a classroom teacher if there was a song that summed up your philosophy, and if not a song, a type of music, are you thrash metal, are you sort of even balanced. So the philosophy of education, the philosophy of educators. 

The next thing is the conversations. What kind of conversations are we having and what kind of conversations do our youngsters have? And one of the strategies I was teaching to people in terms of conversations is this one (performs sign language). So in signing for our deaf community, at least in Aus Land it would be "a little bit, a little bit, a little bit of improvement everyday". And that's the Japanese word Kaizen K A I Z E N. If you are spelling a word and you get it incorrect, instead of just marking it wrong count the letters that are correct and tick them. If a youngster gets three letters correct out of eight and then tomorrow gets seven letters correct out of eight. That's fantastic. That's a little bit of improvement everyday.

So what are the Kaizen things we can do as teacher? What are the Kaizen things, those tiny little nuances we can do to improve our teaching? And then linked to that is the Widezen - that it's not just enough to do what we're already doing a little bit better, we have to use some different crayons that we haven't used before because our young folk are going into a far more complex world. 

So we have philosophy, the kind of conversations and the openess and robust conversations we can have in schools, and then you get to strategies. 

One of my favourite strategies that I'll cover in the keynote are the Russian brothers and their cousin. The first Russian brother, his name is Moreov. so you simply look at all the good stuff that you're already doing that you can do a bit more of. What was good in that classroom? What's good in that essay that the student can do a bit more of? The second brother, Lessov. What does this essay need a bit less of? What do we need to stop doing, do a bit less of in terms of our schools? The third Russian brother, the most important one, Riddov. What do we need to stop doing? What needs to stop in the next essay this student writes? What do we need to get rid of in our schools, and I say that cynicism is one of the factors we need to shed. And the cousin, his name is Tossin. So what new things do we need to toss into the brew? 

So even the Russians can become a new strategy. Our conversation every month in the staff. What does the school need more of, less of, need to get rid of, new things to toss into the brew, what does that lesson need? So it is a less threatening way to do 360 degree feedback in many ways. 

The next layer is methodology. And it is not enough to just do a lecture, it never was enough. But we are now getting such a diverse range of students staying on in our schools right through the spectrum. Some of them used to leave early like my dad, now they're staying. And we need to reach them through physicality, physical learning whether it is signing or doing. Through visual aspects, so not just drawing pictures, but pictures that make sense added to words. So visual notetaking. It's not mindmapping, mindmapping is one visual strategy out of a 1000 that students can learn. But they need a whole stack of methodologies in their backpack, so rather than saying "oh this is boring I can't do it", to go "Okay, how can I turn this information, this stuff that is important, how can I turn it into learning so I own it?" And even our best students, so they're not just passing the exam but they have really got it in their heart and in their core of what it means to them.

So for all of those things, we're talking about a philosophy, we're talking about the kind of conversations in education, we're talking about the strategies, the Russians, we're talking about methodology. And finally flowing through it all are our systems. If we have a philosophy but our systems don't support it, if we believe in collaboration but we reward individual efforts, then collaboration is not going to catch on. To me it's really, for those four things at our core but have really good systems to be able to back it up, and that's the sort of stuff we wish for people in their schools and their communities. 

Date added: 01/16/2013
Creating the layers of learning
Date added: 01/16/2013

Creating the layers of learning

Glenn Capelli was a keynote speaker at ULearn12. In this entertaining and inspirational talk he explores the layers of learning, how we create the environments that our young people need to really embrace learning and embrace thinking. He describes these layers as: philosophy, conversations, strategies, and methodology.

Views 18,545 Date added: 16/01/2013

Creating the layers of learning

It's a delight to do the keynote for the ULearn conference and if there is a thing to be able to get across in a short period of time it would be to talk about the layers of learning, how we create the environments that our young people need to really embrace learning and embrace thinking.

The first layer is philosophy. So when I first went out teaching, my principal Glen Watkins at Wanneroo Senior High School, said "You've got to have a philosophy. What's your philosophy as a first year out teacher?" And I'm going, "What do you mean?" But he said "You don't have to tell me now but at the beginning of term four share your philosophy".

And really for me, I thought it through and I thought how was I taught a philosophy in life?  And my dad Jack, never says much, carpenter who left school very early, Jazz musician, 83 still speaks with a dry humour. And one day he got me and my brother and he said, "Boys, listen to this record". Now a record, as I explain is a circular black thing with a hole in the middle. So he put on a record and we were thinking it was going to be Jazz, but it was an old Tex Williams song, "Do what you do do well, boy, do what you do do well". So basically he was teaching us a philosophy. Whatever we're doing, give it our best shot. Whatever you're getting stuck into give it the best that you've got, whether it's sport, whether it's school whatever it is.

So what is the philosophy of your school? If your school was a song what song would it be? As a classroom teacher if there was a song that summed up your philosophy, and if not a song, a type of music, are you thrash metal, are you sort of even balanced. So the philosophy of education, the philosophy of educators. 

The next thing is the conversations. What kind of conversations are we having and what kind of conversations do our youngsters have? And one of the strategies I was teaching to people in terms of conversations is this one (performs sign language). So in signing for our deaf community, at least in Aus Land it would be "a little bit, a little bit, a little bit of improvement everyday". And that's the Japanese word Kaizen K A I Z E N. If you are spelling a word and you get it incorrect, instead of just marking it wrong count the letters that are correct and tick them. If a youngster gets three letters correct out of eight and then tomorrow gets seven letters correct out of eight. That's fantastic. That's a little bit of improvement everyday.

So what are the Kaizen things we can do as teacher? What are the Kaizen things, those tiny little nuances we can do to improve our teaching? And then linked to that is the Widezen - that it's not just enough to do what we're already doing a little bit better, we have to use some different crayons that we haven't used before because our young folk are going into a far more complex world. 

So we have philosophy, the kind of conversations and the openess and robust conversations we can have in schools, and then you get to strategies. 

One of my favourite strategies that I'll cover in the keynote are the Russian brothers and their cousin. The first Russian brother, his name is Moreov. so you simply look at all the good stuff that you're already doing that you can do a bit more of. What was good in that classroom? What's good in that essay that the student can do a bit more of? The second brother, Lessov. What does this essay need a bit less of? What do we need to stop doing, do a bit less of in terms of our schools? The third Russian brother, the most important one, Riddov. What do we need to stop doing? What needs to stop in the next essay this student writes? What do we need to get rid of in our schools, and I say that cynicism is one of the factors we need to shed. And the cousin, his name is Tossin. So what new things do we need to toss into the brew? 

So even the Russians can become a new strategy. Our conversation every month in the staff. What does the school need more of, less of, need to get rid of, new things to toss into the brew, what does that lesson need? So it is a less threatening way to do 360 degree feedback in many ways. 

The next layer is methodology. And it is not enough to just do a lecture, it never was enough. But we are now getting such a diverse range of students staying on in our schools right through the spectrum. Some of them used to leave early like my dad, now they're staying. And we need to reach them through physicality, physical learning whether it is signing or doing. Through visual aspects, so not just drawing pictures, but pictures that make sense added to words. So visual notetaking. It's not mindmapping, mindmapping is one visual strategy out of a 1000 that students can learn. But they need a whole stack of methodologies in their backpack, so rather than saying "oh this is boring I can't do it", to go "Okay, how can I turn this information, this stuff that is important, how can I turn it into learning so I own it?" And even our best students, so they're not just passing the exam but they have really got it in their heart and in their core of what it means to them.

So for all of those things, we're talking about a philosophy, we're talking about the kind of conversations in education, we're talking about the strategies, the Russians, we're talking about methodology. And finally flowing through it all are our systems. If we have a philosophy but our systems don't support it, if we believe in collaboration but we reward individual efforts, then collaboration is not going to catch on. To me it's really, for those four things at our core but have really good systems to be able to back it up, and that's the sort of stuff we wish for people in their schools and their communities. 

It's a delight to do the keynote for the ULearn conference and if there is a thing to be able to get across in a short period of time it would be to talk about the layers of learning, how we create the environments that our young people need to really embrace learning and embrace thinking.

The first layer is philosophy. So when I first went out teaching, my principal Glen Watkins at Wanneroo Senior High School, said "You've got to have a philosophy. What's your philosophy as a first year out teacher?" And I'm going, "What do you mean?" But he said "You don't have to tell me now but at the beginning of term four share your philosophy".

And really for me, I thought it through and I thought how was I taught a philosophy in life?  And my dad Jack, never says much, carpenter who left school very early, Jazz musician, 83 still speaks with a dry humour. And one day he got me and my brother and he said, "Boys, listen to this record". Now a record, as I explain is a circular black thing with a hole in the middle. So he put on a record and we were thinking it was going to be Jazz, but it was an old Tex Williams song, "Do what you do do well, boy, do what you do do well". So basically he was teaching us a philosophy. Whatever we're doing, give it our best shot. Whatever you're getting stuck into give it the best that you've got, whether it's sport, whether it's school whatever it is.

So what is the philosophy of your school? If your school was a song what song would it be? As a classroom teacher if there was a song that summed up your philosophy, and if not a song, a type of music, are you thrash metal, are you sort of even balanced. So the philosophy of education, the philosophy of educators. 

The next thing is the conversations. What kind of conversations are we having and what kind of conversations do our youngsters have? And one of the strategies I was teaching to people in terms of conversations is this one (performs sign language). So in signing for our deaf community, at least in Aus Land it would be "a little bit, a little bit, a little bit of improvement everyday". And that's the Japanese word Kaizen K A I Z E N. If you are spelling a word and you get it incorrect, instead of just marking it wrong count the letters that are correct and tick them. If a youngster gets three letters correct out of eight and then tomorrow gets seven letters correct out of eight. That's fantastic. That's a little bit of improvement everyday.

So what are the Kaizen things we can do as teacher? What are the Kaizen things, those tiny little nuances we can do to improve our teaching? And then linked to that is the Widezen - that it's not just enough to do what we're already doing a little bit better, we have to use some different crayons that we haven't used before because our young folk are going into a far more complex world. 

So we have philosophy, the kind of conversations and the openess and robust conversations we can have in schools, and then you get to strategies. 

One of my favourite strategies that I'll cover in the keynote are the Russian brothers and their cousin. The first Russian brother, his name is Moreov. so you simply look at all the good stuff that you're already doing that you can do a bit more of. What was good in that classroom? What's good in that essay that the student can do a bit more of? The second brother, Lessov. What does this essay need a bit less of? What do we need to stop doing, do a bit less of in terms of our schools? The third Russian brother, the most important one, Riddov. What do we need to stop doing? What needs to stop in the next essay this student writes? What do we need to get rid of in our schools, and I say that cynicism is one of the factors we need to shed. And the cousin, his name is Tossin. So what new things do we need to toss into the brew? 

So even the Russians can become a new strategy. Our conversation every month in the staff. What does the school need more of, less of, need to get rid of, new things to toss into the brew, what does that lesson need? So it is a less threatening way to do 360 degree feedback in many ways. 

The next layer is methodology. And it is not enough to just do a lecture, it never was enough. But we are now getting such a diverse range of students staying on in our schools right through the spectrum. Some of them used to leave early like my dad, now they're staying. And we need to reach them through physicality, physical learning whether it is signing or doing. Through visual aspects, so not just drawing pictures, but pictures that make sense added to words. So visual notetaking. It's not mindmapping, mindmapping is one visual strategy out of a 1000 that students can learn. But they need a whole stack of methodologies in their backpack, so rather than saying "oh this is boring I can't do it", to go "Okay, how can I turn this information, this stuff that is important, how can I turn it into learning so I own it?" And even our best students, so they're not just passing the exam but they have really got it in their heart and in their core of what it means to them.

So for all of those things, we're talking about a philosophy, we're talking about the kind of conversations in education, we're talking about the strategies, the Russians, we're talking about methodology. And finally flowing through it all are our systems. If we have a philosophy but our systems don't support it, if we believe in collaboration but we reward individual efforts, then collaboration is not going to catch on. To me it's really, for those four things at our core but have really good systems to be able to back it up, and that's the sort of stuff we wish for people in their schools and their communities. 

Date added: 16/01/2013

Creating the layers of learning

Glenn Capelli was a keynote speaker at ULearn12. In this entertaining and inspirational talk he explores the layers of learning, how we create the environments that our young people need to really embrace learning and embrace thinking. He describes these layers as: philosophy, conversations, strategies, and methodology.

Views 18,545 Date added: 16/01/2013

Creating the layers of learning

It's a delight to do the keynote for the ULearn conference and if there is a thing to be able to get across in a short period of time it would be to talk about the layers of learning, how we create the environments that our young people need to really embrace learning and embrace thinking.

The first layer is philosophy. So when I first went out teaching, my principal Glen Watkins at Wanneroo Senior High School, said "You've got to have a philosophy. What's your philosophy as a first year out teacher?" And I'm going, "What do you mean?" But he said "You don't have to tell me now but at the beginning of term four share your philosophy".

And really for me, I thought it through and I thought how was I taught a philosophy in life?  And my dad Jack, never says much, carpenter who left school very early, Jazz musician, 83 still speaks with a dry humour. And one day he got me and my brother and he said, "Boys, listen to this record". Now a record, as I explain is a circular black thing with a hole in the middle. So he put on a record and we were thinking it was going to be Jazz, but it was an old Tex Williams song, "Do what you do do well, boy, do what you do do well". So basically he was teaching us a philosophy. Whatever we're doing, give it our best shot. Whatever you're getting stuck into give it the best that you've got, whether it's sport, whether it's school whatever it is.

So what is the philosophy of your school? If your school was a song what song would it be? As a classroom teacher if there was a song that summed up your philosophy, and if not a song, a type of music, are you thrash metal, are you sort of even balanced. So the philosophy of education, the philosophy of educators. 

The next thing is the conversations. What kind of conversations are we having and what kind of conversations do our youngsters have? And one of the strategies I was teaching to people in terms of conversations is this one (performs sign language). So in signing for our deaf community, at least in Aus Land it would be "a little bit, a little bit, a little bit of improvement everyday". And that's the Japanese word Kaizen K A I Z E N. If you are spelling a word and you get it incorrect, instead of just marking it wrong count the letters that are correct and tick them. If a youngster gets three letters correct out of eight and then tomorrow gets seven letters correct out of eight. That's fantastic. That's a little bit of improvement everyday.

So what are the Kaizen things we can do as teacher? What are the Kaizen things, those tiny little nuances we can do to improve our teaching? And then linked to that is the Widezen - that it's not just enough to do what we're already doing a little bit better, we have to use some different crayons that we haven't used before because our young folk are going into a far more complex world. 

So we have philosophy, the kind of conversations and the openess and robust conversations we can have in schools, and then you get to strategies. 

One of my favourite strategies that I'll cover in the keynote are the Russian brothers and their cousin. The first Russian brother, his name is Moreov. so you simply look at all the good stuff that you're already doing that you can do a bit more of. What was good in that classroom? What's good in that essay that the student can do a bit more of? The second brother, Lessov. What does this essay need a bit less of? What do we need to stop doing, do a bit less of in terms of our schools? The third Russian brother, the most important one, Riddov. What do we need to stop doing? What needs to stop in the next essay this student writes? What do we need to get rid of in our schools, and I say that cynicism is one of the factors we need to shed. And the cousin, his name is Tossin. So what new things do we need to toss into the brew? 

So even the Russians can become a new strategy. Our conversation every month in the staff. What does the school need more of, less of, need to get rid of, new things to toss into the brew, what does that lesson need? So it is a less threatening way to do 360 degree feedback in many ways. 

The next layer is methodology. And it is not enough to just do a lecture, it never was enough. But we are now getting such a diverse range of students staying on in our schools right through the spectrum. Some of them used to leave early like my dad, now they're staying. And we need to reach them through physicality, physical learning whether it is signing or doing. Through visual aspects, so not just drawing pictures, but pictures that make sense added to words. So visual notetaking. It's not mindmapping, mindmapping is one visual strategy out of a 1000 that students can learn. But they need a whole stack of methodologies in their backpack, so rather than saying "oh this is boring I can't do it", to go "Okay, how can I turn this information, this stuff that is important, how can I turn it into learning so I own it?" And even our best students, so they're not just passing the exam but they have really got it in their heart and in their core of what it means to them.

So for all of those things, we're talking about a philosophy, we're talking about the kind of conversations in education, we're talking about the strategies, the Russians, we're talking about methodology. And finally flowing through it all are our systems. If we have a philosophy but our systems don't support it, if we believe in collaboration but we reward individual efforts, then collaboration is not going to catch on. To me it's really, for those four things at our core but have really good systems to be able to back it up, and that's the sort of stuff we wish for people in their schools and their communities. 

It's a delight to do the keynote for the ULearn conference and if there is a thing to be able to get across in a short period of time it would be to talk about the layers of learning, how we create the environments that our young people need to really embrace learning and embrace thinking.

The first layer is philosophy. So when I first went out teaching, my principal Glen Watkins at Wanneroo Senior High School, said "You've got to have a philosophy. What's your philosophy as a first year out teacher?" And I'm going, "What do you mean?" But he said "You don't have to tell me now but at the beginning of term four share your philosophy".

And really for me, I thought it through and I thought how was I taught a philosophy in life?  And my dad Jack, never says much, carpenter who left school very early, Jazz musician, 83 still speaks with a dry humour. And one day he got me and my brother and he said, "Boys, listen to this record". Now a record, as I explain is a circular black thing with a hole in the middle. So he put on a record and we were thinking it was going to be Jazz, but it was an old Tex Williams song, "Do what you do do well, boy, do what you do do well". So basically he was teaching us a philosophy. Whatever we're doing, give it our best shot. Whatever you're getting stuck into give it the best that you've got, whether it's sport, whether it's school whatever it is.

So what is the philosophy of your school? If your school was a song what song would it be? As a classroom teacher if there was a song that summed up your philosophy, and if not a song, a type of music, are you thrash metal, are you sort of even balanced. So the philosophy of education, the philosophy of educators. 

The next thing is the conversations. What kind of conversations are we having and what kind of conversations do our youngsters have? And one of the strategies I was teaching to people in terms of conversations is this one (performs sign language). So in signing for our deaf community, at least in Aus Land it would be "a little bit, a little bit, a little bit of improvement everyday". And that's the Japanese word Kaizen K A I Z E N. If you are spelling a word and you get it incorrect, instead of just marking it wrong count the letters that are correct and tick them. If a youngster gets three letters correct out of eight and then tomorrow gets seven letters correct out of eight. That's fantastic. That's a little bit of improvement everyday.

So what are the Kaizen things we can do as teacher? What are the Kaizen things, those tiny little nuances we can do to improve our teaching? And then linked to that is the Widezen - that it's not just enough to do what we're already doing a little bit better, we have to use some different crayons that we haven't used before because our young folk are going into a far more complex world. 

So we have philosophy, the kind of conversations and the openess and robust conversations we can have in schools, and then you get to strategies. 

One of my favourite strategies that I'll cover in the keynote are the Russian brothers and their cousin. The first Russian brother, his name is Moreov. so you simply look at all the good stuff that you're already doing that you can do a bit more of. What was good in that classroom? What's good in that essay that the student can do a bit more of? The second brother, Lessov. What does this essay need a bit less of? What do we need to stop doing, do a bit less of in terms of our schools? The third Russian brother, the most important one, Riddov. What do we need to stop doing? What needs to stop in the next essay this student writes? What do we need to get rid of in our schools, and I say that cynicism is one of the factors we need to shed. And the cousin, his name is Tossin. So what new things do we need to toss into the brew? 

So even the Russians can become a new strategy. Our conversation every month in the staff. What does the school need more of, less of, need to get rid of, new things to toss into the brew, what does that lesson need? So it is a less threatening way to do 360 degree feedback in many ways. 

The next layer is methodology. And it is not enough to just do a lecture, it never was enough. But we are now getting such a diverse range of students staying on in our schools right through the spectrum. Some of them used to leave early like my dad, now they're staying. And we need to reach them through physicality, physical learning whether it is signing or doing. Through visual aspects, so not just drawing pictures, but pictures that make sense added to words. So visual notetaking. It's not mindmapping, mindmapping is one visual strategy out of a 1000 that students can learn. But they need a whole stack of methodologies in their backpack, so rather than saying "oh this is boring I can't do it", to go "Okay, how can I turn this information, this stuff that is important, how can I turn it into learning so I own it?" And even our best students, so they're not just passing the exam but they have really got it in their heart and in their core of what it means to them.

So for all of those things, we're talking about a philosophy, we're talking about the kind of conversations in education, we're talking about the strategies, the Russians, we're talking about methodology. And finally flowing through it all are our systems. If we have a philosophy but our systems don't support it, if we believe in collaboration but we reward individual efforts, then collaboration is not going to catch on. To me it's really, for those four things at our core but have really good systems to be able to back it up, and that's the sort of stuff we wish for people in their schools and their communities. 

Date added: 16/01/2013

You can find out more about Glenn Capelli on his website 

Glenn was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

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