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In her first EDtalk, you can see how Anne's classroom started out. She explains what she was planning on doing and why >>

Room 6 made a movie documenting the building of their bottle bivy >>

 

The CORE Education eFellowship Awards recognise innovative e-learning practice by New Zealand teachers.

View more stories from CORE Education eFellows in the eFellows EDtalks channel 

Posted by: Carol Gilbert on the 27/10/2012
Brilliant. I've been waiting all year to see the results. What an amazing learning environment for the chn.
Reply

In her first EDtalk, you can see how Anne's classroom started out. She explains what she was planning on doing and why >>

Room 6 made a movie documenting the building of their bottle bivy >>

 

The CORE Education eFellowship Awards recognise innovative e-learning practice by New Zealand teachers.

View more stories from CORE Education eFellows in the eFellows EDtalks channel 

Posted by: Carol Gilbert on the 27/10/2012
Brilliant. I've been waiting all year to see the results. What an amazing learning environment for the chn.
Reply
Speaker: Anne Kenneally

Anne Kenneally started the year looking at desks in rows and thought there just has got to be a better way. She has spent this year experimenting with student designed learning spaces, allowing the students to take the lead in deciding what spaces they need for different activities. In this EDtalk Anne explores the changes in her students and their learning environment.

Views 55,773
Date added: 26 Oct 2012
Duration:

Hi, I'm Anne Kenneally, Deputy Principal for St Mary's School, Mosgiel. This year I set out to create a learning environment that met my needs but more importantly met the needs of my learners. We were experimenting with learning spaces, bring your own devices, blended learning model, and tranformational learning. When the learners arrived, they arrived to desks. Quickly we decided that desks weren't the way for us. We were determined for the learning environment to meet the needs of the learners. We were looking at how they learn best, where, why, when. And empowering the learners to know, to talk about, and discuss their learning needs. We have a learning environment that meets individual needs. We have stand up stations, couches, beanbags, tables. We gather around tables to share and discuss. We've got a kidney table which is a key teaching time. We gather at the mat when we all want to be together. 

We've changed our learning. We learn in pairs, groups, on our own. We move away to the cave, we move out to the deck on a sunny day like today. We've set up discussions in reflection time to know which space works best for which activity.

We like to work in the tent because it is a comfortable enclosed space and we can't be distracted.

We gather together elbow to elbow knee to knee when we want to read together and learn and help each other. We gather around desks when want to discuss a task and focus on where we will go with our learning. We gather in the cave, or, in our latest, greatest, we gather in the bottle bivy. We created a brand new learning space, a bottle bivy, inspired by Mark Herring from Invercargill who posted a picture online of an igloo made out of milk bottles. Trial one fell down, two collapsed, trial three - this magnificent structure you see before you today, which is about to turn into a planetarium. We are going to black it out, fill it with glow in the dark stars, and learn in a completely unique way all over again,

I like reading in the bottle bivy because it's like enclosed and no one is around you and you can just sit there and read. I also like reading but I do like, enjoy maths and other subjects in here, expecially when you are with a partner that can help you and it's really fun because it is just like comfortable, enclosed and especially with these bean bags it makes it really good.

My role in this is enabling the learning to happen. The classrom to evolve and change, to enable and empower my learners to get the best out of their learning. The ubiquity of learning happens when they bring their device, they curl up on the couch, they have an app fest on the mat, they share and empower other learners. They get the beanbags out and they gather in a circle and have a pow wow, a campfire talk. My role in this is often the quiet observer, just saying, "How does that work, why does that work for you?"

The challenges initially were this classroom is four walls, it doesn't open onto a great big shared learning space. This space wasn't purpose built, brand new, modern open learning space. The other challenge was the money. I have not spent one cent of school's money on this new environment. 

I set out with a dream, a dream to create magic for the learners and give them what they needed in their learning space. The challenge was finding what they needed. They needed a little couch, we've got a little couch. They needed beanbags, I've got beanbags everywhere. They needed the quiet space of the cave, and the beach tent fitted that purpose. They needed a big quiet cave, we built the bottle bivy together.

The challenges happen all the time. The challenge for us is how to grab the challenge and turn the challenge into a magic opportunity and create a space that works. A challenge is not being rigid, not staying the way it is.

What's the magic in this for me? The magic is seeing a learner understand, know, discuss, reflect on how they learn. I struggled to learn. I did not enjoy primary school no one told me how, when, why I learn best. My learners can tell me, "Maths isn't working on the mat Mrs K, I'll just be over at the stand up station," "We can't read and discuss this book in here, we'll just be under the shelf over there if you need us." No one told me that learning spaces matter, choices matter.

My learners not only have the choice, they understand why they learn best, where, how and when. 

Hi, I'm Anne Kenneally, Deputy Principal for St Mary's School, Mosgiel. This year I set out to create a learning environment that met my needs but more importantly met the needs of my learners. We were experimenting with learning spaces, bring your own devices, blended learning model, and tranformational learning. When the learners arrived, they arrived to desks. Quickly we decided that desks weren't the way for us. We were determined for the learning environment to meet the needs of the learners. We were looking at how they learn best, where, why, when. And empowering the learners to know, to talk about, and discuss their learning needs. We have a learning environment that meets individual needs. We have stand up stations, couches, beanbags, tables. We gather around tables to share and discuss. We've got a kidney table which is a key teaching time. We gather at the mat when we all want to be together. 

We've changed our learning. We learn in pairs, groups, on our own. We move away to the cave, we move out to the deck on a sunny day like today. We've set up discussions in reflection time to know which space works best for which activity.

We like to work in the tent because it is a comfortable enclosed space and we can't be distracted.

We gather together elbow to elbow knee to knee when we want to read together and learn and help each other. We gather around desks when want to discuss a task and focus on where we will go with our learning. We gather in the cave, or, in our latest, greatest, we gather in the bottle bivy. We created a brand new learning space, a bottle bivy, inspired by Mark Herring from Invercargill who posted a picture online of an igloo made out of milk bottles. Trial one fell down, two collapsed, trial three - this magnificent structure you see before you today, which is about to turn into a planetarium. We are going to black it out, fill it with glow in the dark stars, and learn in a completely unique way all over again,

I like reading in the bottle bivy because it's like enclosed and no one is around you and you can just sit there and read. I also like reading but I do like, enjoy maths and other subjects in here, expecially when you are with a partner that can help you and it's really fun because it is just like comfortable, enclosed and especially with these bean bags it makes it really good.

My role in this is enabling the learning to happen. The classrom to evolve and change, to enable and empower my learners to get the best out of their learning. The ubiquity of learning happens when they bring their device, they curl up on the couch, they have an app fest on the mat, they share and empower other learners. They get the beanbags out and they gather in a circle and have a pow wow, a campfire talk. My role in this is often the quiet observer, just saying, "How does that work, why does that work for you?"

The challenges initially were this classroom is four walls, it doesn't open onto a great big shared learning space. This space wasn't purpose built, brand new, modern open learning space. The other challenge was the money. I have not spent one cent of school's money on this new environment. 

I set out with a dream, a dream to create magic for the learners and give them what they needed in their learning space. The challenge was finding what they needed. They needed a little couch, we've got a little couch. They needed beanbags, I've got beanbags everywhere. They needed the quiet space of the cave, and the beach tent fitted that purpose. They needed a big quiet cave, we built the bottle bivy together.

The challenges happen all the time. The challenge for us is how to grab the challenge and turn the challenge into a magic opportunity and create a space that works. A challenge is not being rigid, not staying the way it is.

What's the magic in this for me? The magic is seeing a learner understand, know, discuss, reflect on how they learn. I struggled to learn. I did not enjoy primary school no one told me how, when, why I learn best. My learners can tell me, "Maths isn't working on the mat Mrs K, I'll just be over at the stand up station," "We can't read and discuss this book in here, we'll just be under the shelf over there if you need us." No one told me that learning spaces matter, choices matter.

My learners not only have the choice, they understand why they learn best, where, how and when. 

Date added: 10/26/2012
Creating learning spaces
Date added: 10/26/2012

Creating learning spaces

Anne Kenneally started the year looking at desks in rows and thought there just has got to be a better way. She has spent this year experimenting with student designed learning spaces, allowing the students to take the lead in deciding what spaces they need for different activities. In this EDtalk Anne explores the changes in her students and their learning environment.

Views 55,773 Date added: 26/10/2012

Creating learning spaces

Hi, I'm Anne Kenneally, Deputy Principal for St Mary's School, Mosgiel. This year I set out to create a learning environment that met my needs but more importantly met the needs of my learners. We were experimenting with learning spaces, bring your own devices, blended learning model, and tranformational learning. When the learners arrived, they arrived to desks. Quickly we decided that desks weren't the way for us. We were determined for the learning environment to meet the needs of the learners. We were looking at how they learn best, where, why, when. And empowering the learners to know, to talk about, and discuss their learning needs. We have a learning environment that meets individual needs. We have stand up stations, couches, beanbags, tables. We gather around tables to share and discuss. We've got a kidney table which is a key teaching time. We gather at the mat when we all want to be together. 

We've changed our learning. We learn in pairs, groups, on our own. We move away to the cave, we move out to the deck on a sunny day like today. We've set up discussions in reflection time to know which space works best for which activity.

We like to work in the tent because it is a comfortable enclosed space and we can't be distracted.

We gather together elbow to elbow knee to knee when we want to read together and learn and help each other. We gather around desks when want to discuss a task and focus on where we will go with our learning. We gather in the cave, or, in our latest, greatest, we gather in the bottle bivy. We created a brand new learning space, a bottle bivy, inspired by Mark Herring from Invercargill who posted a picture online of an igloo made out of milk bottles. Trial one fell down, two collapsed, trial three - this magnificent structure you see before you today, which is about to turn into a planetarium. We are going to black it out, fill it with glow in the dark stars, and learn in a completely unique way all over again,

I like reading in the bottle bivy because it's like enclosed and no one is around you and you can just sit there and read. I also like reading but I do like, enjoy maths and other subjects in here, expecially when you are with a partner that can help you and it's really fun because it is just like comfortable, enclosed and especially with these bean bags it makes it really good.

My role in this is enabling the learning to happen. The classrom to evolve and change, to enable and empower my learners to get the best out of their learning. The ubiquity of learning happens when they bring their device, they curl up on the couch, they have an app fest on the mat, they share and empower other learners. They get the beanbags out and they gather in a circle and have a pow wow, a campfire talk. My role in this is often the quiet observer, just saying, "How does that work, why does that work for you?"

The challenges initially were this classroom is four walls, it doesn't open onto a great big shared learning space. This space wasn't purpose built, brand new, modern open learning space. The other challenge was the money. I have not spent one cent of school's money on this new environment. 

I set out with a dream, a dream to create magic for the learners and give them what they needed in their learning space. The challenge was finding what they needed. They needed a little couch, we've got a little couch. They needed beanbags, I've got beanbags everywhere. They needed the quiet space of the cave, and the beach tent fitted that purpose. They needed a big quiet cave, we built the bottle bivy together.

The challenges happen all the time. The challenge for us is how to grab the challenge and turn the challenge into a magic opportunity and create a space that works. A challenge is not being rigid, not staying the way it is.

What's the magic in this for me? The magic is seeing a learner understand, know, discuss, reflect on how they learn. I struggled to learn. I did not enjoy primary school no one told me how, when, why I learn best. My learners can tell me, "Maths isn't working on the mat Mrs K, I'll just be over at the stand up station," "We can't read and discuss this book in here, we'll just be under the shelf over there if you need us." No one told me that learning spaces matter, choices matter.

My learners not only have the choice, they understand why they learn best, where, how and when. 

Hi, I'm Anne Kenneally, Deputy Principal for St Mary's School, Mosgiel. This year I set out to create a learning environment that met my needs but more importantly met the needs of my learners. We were experimenting with learning spaces, bring your own devices, blended learning model, and tranformational learning. When the learners arrived, they arrived to desks. Quickly we decided that desks weren't the way for us. We were determined for the learning environment to meet the needs of the learners. We were looking at how they learn best, where, why, when. And empowering the learners to know, to talk about, and discuss their learning needs. We have a learning environment that meets individual needs. We have stand up stations, couches, beanbags, tables. We gather around tables to share and discuss. We've got a kidney table which is a key teaching time. We gather at the mat when we all want to be together. 

We've changed our learning. We learn in pairs, groups, on our own. We move away to the cave, we move out to the deck on a sunny day like today. We've set up discussions in reflection time to know which space works best for which activity.

We like to work in the tent because it is a comfortable enclosed space and we can't be distracted.

We gather together elbow to elbow knee to knee when we want to read together and learn and help each other. We gather around desks when want to discuss a task and focus on where we will go with our learning. We gather in the cave, or, in our latest, greatest, we gather in the bottle bivy. We created a brand new learning space, a bottle bivy, inspired by Mark Herring from Invercargill who posted a picture online of an igloo made out of milk bottles. Trial one fell down, two collapsed, trial three - this magnificent structure you see before you today, which is about to turn into a planetarium. We are going to black it out, fill it with glow in the dark stars, and learn in a completely unique way all over again,

I like reading in the bottle bivy because it's like enclosed and no one is around you and you can just sit there and read. I also like reading but I do like, enjoy maths and other subjects in here, expecially when you are with a partner that can help you and it's really fun because it is just like comfortable, enclosed and especially with these bean bags it makes it really good.

My role in this is enabling the learning to happen. The classrom to evolve and change, to enable and empower my learners to get the best out of their learning. The ubiquity of learning happens when they bring their device, they curl up on the couch, they have an app fest on the mat, they share and empower other learners. They get the beanbags out and they gather in a circle and have a pow wow, a campfire talk. My role in this is often the quiet observer, just saying, "How does that work, why does that work for you?"

The challenges initially were this classroom is four walls, it doesn't open onto a great big shared learning space. This space wasn't purpose built, brand new, modern open learning space. The other challenge was the money. I have not spent one cent of school's money on this new environment. 

I set out with a dream, a dream to create magic for the learners and give them what they needed in their learning space. The challenge was finding what they needed. They needed a little couch, we've got a little couch. They needed beanbags, I've got beanbags everywhere. They needed the quiet space of the cave, and the beach tent fitted that purpose. They needed a big quiet cave, we built the bottle bivy together.

The challenges happen all the time. The challenge for us is how to grab the challenge and turn the challenge into a magic opportunity and create a space that works. A challenge is not being rigid, not staying the way it is.

What's the magic in this for me? The magic is seeing a learner understand, know, discuss, reflect on how they learn. I struggled to learn. I did not enjoy primary school no one told me how, when, why I learn best. My learners can tell me, "Maths isn't working on the mat Mrs K, I'll just be over at the stand up station," "We can't read and discuss this book in here, we'll just be under the shelf over there if you need us." No one told me that learning spaces matter, choices matter.

My learners not only have the choice, they understand why they learn best, where, how and when. 

Date added: 26/10/2012

Creating learning spaces

Anne Kenneally started the year looking at desks in rows and thought there just has got to be a better way. She has spent this year experimenting with student designed learning spaces, allowing the students to take the lead in deciding what spaces they need for different activities. In this EDtalk Anne explores the changes in her students and their learning environment.

Views 55,773 Date added: 26/10/2012

Creating learning spaces

Hi, I'm Anne Kenneally, Deputy Principal for St Mary's School, Mosgiel. This year I set out to create a learning environment that met my needs but more importantly met the needs of my learners. We were experimenting with learning spaces, bring your own devices, blended learning model, and tranformational learning. When the learners arrived, they arrived to desks. Quickly we decided that desks weren't the way for us. We were determined for the learning environment to meet the needs of the learners. We were looking at how they learn best, where, why, when. And empowering the learners to know, to talk about, and discuss their learning needs. We have a learning environment that meets individual needs. We have stand up stations, couches, beanbags, tables. We gather around tables to share and discuss. We've got a kidney table which is a key teaching time. We gather at the mat when we all want to be together. 

We've changed our learning. We learn in pairs, groups, on our own. We move away to the cave, we move out to the deck on a sunny day like today. We've set up discussions in reflection time to know which space works best for which activity.

We like to work in the tent because it is a comfortable enclosed space and we can't be distracted.

We gather together elbow to elbow knee to knee when we want to read together and learn and help each other. We gather around desks when want to discuss a task and focus on where we will go with our learning. We gather in the cave, or, in our latest, greatest, we gather in the bottle bivy. We created a brand new learning space, a bottle bivy, inspired by Mark Herring from Invercargill who posted a picture online of an igloo made out of milk bottles. Trial one fell down, two collapsed, trial three - this magnificent structure you see before you today, which is about to turn into a planetarium. We are going to black it out, fill it with glow in the dark stars, and learn in a completely unique way all over again,

I like reading in the bottle bivy because it's like enclosed and no one is around you and you can just sit there and read. I also like reading but I do like, enjoy maths and other subjects in here, expecially when you are with a partner that can help you and it's really fun because it is just like comfortable, enclosed and especially with these bean bags it makes it really good.

My role in this is enabling the learning to happen. The classrom to evolve and change, to enable and empower my learners to get the best out of their learning. The ubiquity of learning happens when they bring their device, they curl up on the couch, they have an app fest on the mat, they share and empower other learners. They get the beanbags out and they gather in a circle and have a pow wow, a campfire talk. My role in this is often the quiet observer, just saying, "How does that work, why does that work for you?"

The challenges initially were this classroom is four walls, it doesn't open onto a great big shared learning space. This space wasn't purpose built, brand new, modern open learning space. The other challenge was the money. I have not spent one cent of school's money on this new environment. 

I set out with a dream, a dream to create magic for the learners and give them what they needed in their learning space. The challenge was finding what they needed. They needed a little couch, we've got a little couch. They needed beanbags, I've got beanbags everywhere. They needed the quiet space of the cave, and the beach tent fitted that purpose. They needed a big quiet cave, we built the bottle bivy together.

The challenges happen all the time. The challenge for us is how to grab the challenge and turn the challenge into a magic opportunity and create a space that works. A challenge is not being rigid, not staying the way it is.

What's the magic in this for me? The magic is seeing a learner understand, know, discuss, reflect on how they learn. I struggled to learn. I did not enjoy primary school no one told me how, when, why I learn best. My learners can tell me, "Maths isn't working on the mat Mrs K, I'll just be over at the stand up station," "We can't read and discuss this book in here, we'll just be under the shelf over there if you need us." No one told me that learning spaces matter, choices matter.

My learners not only have the choice, they understand why they learn best, where, how and when. 

Hi, I'm Anne Kenneally, Deputy Principal for St Mary's School, Mosgiel. This year I set out to create a learning environment that met my needs but more importantly met the needs of my learners. We were experimenting with learning spaces, bring your own devices, blended learning model, and tranformational learning. When the learners arrived, they arrived to desks. Quickly we decided that desks weren't the way for us. We were determined for the learning environment to meet the needs of the learners. We were looking at how they learn best, where, why, when. And empowering the learners to know, to talk about, and discuss their learning needs. We have a learning environment that meets individual needs. We have stand up stations, couches, beanbags, tables. We gather around tables to share and discuss. We've got a kidney table which is a key teaching time. We gather at the mat when we all want to be together. 

We've changed our learning. We learn in pairs, groups, on our own. We move away to the cave, we move out to the deck on a sunny day like today. We've set up discussions in reflection time to know which space works best for which activity.

We like to work in the tent because it is a comfortable enclosed space and we can't be distracted.

We gather together elbow to elbow knee to knee when we want to read together and learn and help each other. We gather around desks when want to discuss a task and focus on where we will go with our learning. We gather in the cave, or, in our latest, greatest, we gather in the bottle bivy. We created a brand new learning space, a bottle bivy, inspired by Mark Herring from Invercargill who posted a picture online of an igloo made out of milk bottles. Trial one fell down, two collapsed, trial three - this magnificent structure you see before you today, which is about to turn into a planetarium. We are going to black it out, fill it with glow in the dark stars, and learn in a completely unique way all over again,

I like reading in the bottle bivy because it's like enclosed and no one is around you and you can just sit there and read. I also like reading but I do like, enjoy maths and other subjects in here, expecially when you are with a partner that can help you and it's really fun because it is just like comfortable, enclosed and especially with these bean bags it makes it really good.

My role in this is enabling the learning to happen. The classrom to evolve and change, to enable and empower my learners to get the best out of their learning. The ubiquity of learning happens when they bring their device, they curl up on the couch, they have an app fest on the mat, they share and empower other learners. They get the beanbags out and they gather in a circle and have a pow wow, a campfire talk. My role in this is often the quiet observer, just saying, "How does that work, why does that work for you?"

The challenges initially were this classroom is four walls, it doesn't open onto a great big shared learning space. This space wasn't purpose built, brand new, modern open learning space. The other challenge was the money. I have not spent one cent of school's money on this new environment. 

I set out with a dream, a dream to create magic for the learners and give them what they needed in their learning space. The challenge was finding what they needed. They needed a little couch, we've got a little couch. They needed beanbags, I've got beanbags everywhere. They needed the quiet space of the cave, and the beach tent fitted that purpose. They needed a big quiet cave, we built the bottle bivy together.

The challenges happen all the time. The challenge for us is how to grab the challenge and turn the challenge into a magic opportunity and create a space that works. A challenge is not being rigid, not staying the way it is.

What's the magic in this for me? The magic is seeing a learner understand, know, discuss, reflect on how they learn. I struggled to learn. I did not enjoy primary school no one told me how, when, why I learn best. My learners can tell me, "Maths isn't working on the mat Mrs K, I'll just be over at the stand up station," "We can't read and discuss this book in here, we'll just be under the shelf over there if you need us." No one told me that learning spaces matter, choices matter.

My learners not only have the choice, they understand why they learn best, where, how and when. 

Date added: 26/10/2012

In her first EDtalk, you can see how Anne's classroom started out. She explains what she was planning on doing and why >>

Room 6 made a movie documenting the building of their bottle bivy >>

 

The CORE Education eFellowship Awards recognise innovative e-learning practice by New Zealand teachers.

View more stories from CORE Education eFellows in the eFellows EDtalks channel 

Posted by: Carol Gilbert on the 27/10/2012
Brilliant. I've been waiting all year to see the results. What an amazing learning environment for the chn.
Reply

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