Interviews, discussions, and
presentations from thought
leaders, innovative educators,
and inspirational learners.

Search form


(0)

You can find out more about Kevin on his website >>

The ULearn12 channel has many more videos recorded at the conference. 

 

Find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

You can find out more about Kevin on his website >>

The ULearn12 channel has many more videos recorded at the conference. 

 

Find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

Kevin Honeycutt was a keynote speaker at ULearn12. In this talk he provides some ideas for how to work alongside teachers as they explore the tools and ideas available to them to make a difference for their kids. 

Views 14,982
Date added: 18 Jan 2013
Duration: 4:43

Okay so a big part of my job is to stand in front of audiences, and I get paid to make people 'want to'. That's what teachers do. I just do that with teachers now. So when I speak to teachers I am opening cognitive cell doors for students who are in their charge. This is anointed work for me, but let me give you a Swiss army knife that works. I've spoken to so many people in so many places. How do you move a culture? Especially when it has to move. Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic doesn't do much for the iceberg right. So we've got to move. So how do we do that.

You're talking to an audience, a bunch of tired teachers. First of all, honour them. They are doing the best they can with what they have. Invite them don't indite them. So what I like to do is show models. Here's a glowing model. I never say "You're not doing this" or that "You should do this". I don't wag my finger. I say "look at this beautiful thing, isn't this a wonderful thing". I shine a light up here and I invite you without saying it, into the light here.

So I tell stories and stories are powerful. We are stories. That's what we are. Our brain remembers stories up to the day we die. We are a collection of stories so acknowledge that. So where are your stories? Stories of transformation, beautiful heroic stories. And by the way they can't be 30 minutes or an hour, they've got to be 2 minutes. I know but they've got to be.

So you've got stories, you all do, collect them, collect them, they move hearts and minds. So share those stories and don't be humble about it. You've got great things going in your schools, but I bet no one's getting the story. Well we have devices everywhere with cameras, let's do this. Where are the student film crews following the stories. And even if you can't edit it today at least you've got it. You are doing these great things and you rarely get evidence and evidence is what makes it possible to to build capacity to keep serving children, It is the cost of admission. It's getting easier now.

So when I'm talking to a group of people I tell them stories. First I connect to them and let them know that I'm like them. I'm not some person over here who has a million things I'm going to talk about. I actually do the things I say. Make sure you do that. Be real, get into classrooms, try these, with tough kids, with gifted kids, try these things. And tell the story, what worked, what didn't work, that's okay to talk about what didn't work too, we learn from failure. And then they know that it may not work for them but that's okay. I guess be human in front of a group.

They don't care, authority doesn't come from expertise. It comes from trusting that you're like me and that you like me. Those two things right. And that you do a job that's not unlike mine. And here's a couple of ideas, Betty Crocker recipes that I can just grab and do. And you might say things about teachers like "they just want it to be easy". They need it to be easy, they are up to their armpits in alligators there's no time to drain the swamp. They need a solution, they need a simple thing they can do tomorrow, not real high stakes, I'm going to try this. 

And I always tell teachers if you try this have plan B in your back pocket. Or at this conference, or with the web, we're having issues with the web if that's a deal breaker then we are all doomed. But we have other ways, you always do that, that's always been necessary. So tell teachers it's okay if you need to punt. If the thing you plan doesn't work what's plan B so you don't have an aneurysm when it all doesn't work. 

And we need to help each other and what I say, if I tell you, you have to do everything I just taught you and remember all of it, come on, who can do that. Pick one thing, one thing. A movement is a movement, that means there's movement right. So pick one thing you heard today and do something that matters for kids. You do this, she'll do that, he'll do that and we'll help each other. You show me how to do that, I'll show you, as a community. You see how community is essential, it's essential. And I think we used to lock our classroom door and just live inside that room. And the kids only got what you have here right. And that was a benevolent act we did the best we could but it assumed that one person was this amazing expert. And that's over now. Knowledge is ubiquitous. What kids need is to be guided, to learn how to learn, so whatever stands in your way, knock it down. Leverage social networks, leverage the power of community, and as a family we can do right by kids. 

Okay so a big part of my job is to stand in front of audiences, and I get paid to make people 'want to'. That's what teachers do. I just do that with teachers now. So when I speak to teachers I am opening cognitive cell doors for students who are in their charge. This is anointed work for me, but let me give you a Swiss army knife that works. I've spoken to so many people in so many places. How do you move a culture? Especially when it has to move. Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic doesn't do much for the iceberg right. So we've got to move. So how do we do that.

You're talking to an audience, a bunch of tired teachers. First of all, honour them. They are doing the best they can with what they have. Invite them don't indite them. So what I like to do is show models. Here's a glowing model. I never say "You're not doing this" or that "You should do this". I don't wag my finger. I say "look at this beautiful thing, isn't this a wonderful thing". I shine a light up here and I invite you without saying it, into the light here.

So I tell stories and stories are powerful. We are stories. That's what we are. Our brain remembers stories up to the day we die. We are a collection of stories so acknowledge that. So where are your stories? Stories of transformation, beautiful heroic stories. And by the way they can't be 30 minutes or an hour, they've got to be 2 minutes. I know but they've got to be.

So you've got stories, you all do, collect them, collect them, they move hearts and minds. So share those stories and don't be humble about it. You've got great things going in your schools, but I bet no one's getting the story. Well we have devices everywhere with cameras, let's do this. Where are the student film crews following the stories. And even if you can't edit it today at least you've got it. You are doing these great things and you rarely get evidence and evidence is what makes it possible to to build capacity to keep serving children, It is the cost of admission. It's getting easier now.

So when I'm talking to a group of people I tell them stories. First I connect to them and let them know that I'm like them. I'm not some person over here who has a million things I'm going to talk about. I actually do the things I say. Make sure you do that. Be real, get into classrooms, try these, with tough kids, with gifted kids, try these things. And tell the story, what worked, what didn't work, that's okay to talk about what didn't work too, we learn from failure. And then they know that it may not work for them but that's okay. I guess be human in front of a group.

They don't care, authority doesn't come from expertise. It comes from trusting that you're like me and that you like me. Those two things right. And that you do a job that's not unlike mine. And here's a couple of ideas, Betty Crocker recipes that I can just grab and do. And you might say things about teachers like "they just want it to be easy". They need it to be easy, they are up to their armpits in alligators there's no time to drain the swamp. They need a solution, they need a simple thing they can do tomorrow, not real high stakes, I'm going to try this. 

And I always tell teachers if you try this have plan B in your back pocket. Or at this conference, or with the web, we're having issues with the web if that's a deal breaker then we are all doomed. But we have other ways, you always do that, that's always been necessary. So tell teachers it's okay if you need to punt. If the thing you plan doesn't work what's plan B so you don't have an aneurysm when it all doesn't work. 

And we need to help each other and what I say, if I tell you, you have to do everything I just taught you and remember all of it, come on, who can do that. Pick one thing, one thing. A movement is a movement, that means there's movement right. So pick one thing you heard today and do something that matters for kids. You do this, she'll do that, he'll do that and we'll help each other. You show me how to do that, I'll show you, as a community. You see how community is essential, it's essential. And I think we used to lock our classroom door and just live inside that room. And the kids only got what you have here right. And that was a benevolent act we did the best we could but it assumed that one person was this amazing expert. And that's over now. Knowledge is ubiquitous. What kids need is to be guided, to learn how to learn, so whatever stands in your way, knock it down. Leverage social networks, leverage the power of community, and as a family we can do right by kids. 

Date added: 01/18/2013
Inviting teachers into the light
Date added: 01/18/2013

Inviting teachers into the light

Kevin Honeycutt was a keynote speaker at ULearn12. In this talk he provides some ideas for how to work alongside teachers as they explore the tools and ideas available to them to make a difference for their kids. 

Views 14,982 Date added: 18/01/2013

Inviting teachers into the light

Okay so a big part of my job is to stand in front of audiences, and I get paid to make people 'want to'. That's what teachers do. I just do that with teachers now. So when I speak to teachers I am opening cognitive cell doors for students who are in their charge. This is anointed work for me, but let me give you a Swiss army knife that works. I've spoken to so many people in so many places. How do you move a culture? Especially when it has to move. Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic doesn't do much for the iceberg right. So we've got to move. So how do we do that.

You're talking to an audience, a bunch of tired teachers. First of all, honour them. They are doing the best they can with what they have. Invite them don't indite them. So what I like to do is show models. Here's a glowing model. I never say "You're not doing this" or that "You should do this". I don't wag my finger. I say "look at this beautiful thing, isn't this a wonderful thing". I shine a light up here and I invite you without saying it, into the light here.

So I tell stories and stories are powerful. We are stories. That's what we are. Our brain remembers stories up to the day we die. We are a collection of stories so acknowledge that. So where are your stories? Stories of transformation, beautiful heroic stories. And by the way they can't be 30 minutes or an hour, they've got to be 2 minutes. I know but they've got to be.

So you've got stories, you all do, collect them, collect them, they move hearts and minds. So share those stories and don't be humble about it. You've got great things going in your schools, but I bet no one's getting the story. Well we have devices everywhere with cameras, let's do this. Where are the student film crews following the stories. And even if you can't edit it today at least you've got it. You are doing these great things and you rarely get evidence and evidence is what makes it possible to to build capacity to keep serving children, It is the cost of admission. It's getting easier now.

So when I'm talking to a group of people I tell them stories. First I connect to them and let them know that I'm like them. I'm not some person over here who has a million things I'm going to talk about. I actually do the things I say. Make sure you do that. Be real, get into classrooms, try these, with tough kids, with gifted kids, try these things. And tell the story, what worked, what didn't work, that's okay to talk about what didn't work too, we learn from failure. And then they know that it may not work for them but that's okay. I guess be human in front of a group.

They don't care, authority doesn't come from expertise. It comes from trusting that you're like me and that you like me. Those two things right. And that you do a job that's not unlike mine. And here's a couple of ideas, Betty Crocker recipes that I can just grab and do. And you might say things about teachers like "they just want it to be easy". They need it to be easy, they are up to their armpits in alligators there's no time to drain the swamp. They need a solution, they need a simple thing they can do tomorrow, not real high stakes, I'm going to try this. 

And I always tell teachers if you try this have plan B in your back pocket. Or at this conference, or with the web, we're having issues with the web if that's a deal breaker then we are all doomed. But we have other ways, you always do that, that's always been necessary. So tell teachers it's okay if you need to punt. If the thing you plan doesn't work what's plan B so you don't have an aneurysm when it all doesn't work. 

And we need to help each other and what I say, if I tell you, you have to do everything I just taught you and remember all of it, come on, who can do that. Pick one thing, one thing. A movement is a movement, that means there's movement right. So pick one thing you heard today and do something that matters for kids. You do this, she'll do that, he'll do that and we'll help each other. You show me how to do that, I'll show you, as a community. You see how community is essential, it's essential. And I think we used to lock our classroom door and just live inside that room. And the kids only got what you have here right. And that was a benevolent act we did the best we could but it assumed that one person was this amazing expert. And that's over now. Knowledge is ubiquitous. What kids need is to be guided, to learn how to learn, so whatever stands in your way, knock it down. Leverage social networks, leverage the power of community, and as a family we can do right by kids. 

Okay so a big part of my job is to stand in front of audiences, and I get paid to make people 'want to'. That's what teachers do. I just do that with teachers now. So when I speak to teachers I am opening cognitive cell doors for students who are in their charge. This is anointed work for me, but let me give you a Swiss army knife that works. I've spoken to so many people in so many places. How do you move a culture? Especially when it has to move. Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic doesn't do much for the iceberg right. So we've got to move. So how do we do that.

You're talking to an audience, a bunch of tired teachers. First of all, honour them. They are doing the best they can with what they have. Invite them don't indite them. So what I like to do is show models. Here's a glowing model. I never say "You're not doing this" or that "You should do this". I don't wag my finger. I say "look at this beautiful thing, isn't this a wonderful thing". I shine a light up here and I invite you without saying it, into the light here.

So I tell stories and stories are powerful. We are stories. That's what we are. Our brain remembers stories up to the day we die. We are a collection of stories so acknowledge that. So where are your stories? Stories of transformation, beautiful heroic stories. And by the way they can't be 30 minutes or an hour, they've got to be 2 minutes. I know but they've got to be.

So you've got stories, you all do, collect them, collect them, they move hearts and minds. So share those stories and don't be humble about it. You've got great things going in your schools, but I bet no one's getting the story. Well we have devices everywhere with cameras, let's do this. Where are the student film crews following the stories. And even if you can't edit it today at least you've got it. You are doing these great things and you rarely get evidence and evidence is what makes it possible to to build capacity to keep serving children, It is the cost of admission. It's getting easier now.

So when I'm talking to a group of people I tell them stories. First I connect to them and let them know that I'm like them. I'm not some person over here who has a million things I'm going to talk about. I actually do the things I say. Make sure you do that. Be real, get into classrooms, try these, with tough kids, with gifted kids, try these things. And tell the story, what worked, what didn't work, that's okay to talk about what didn't work too, we learn from failure. And then they know that it may not work for them but that's okay. I guess be human in front of a group.

They don't care, authority doesn't come from expertise. It comes from trusting that you're like me and that you like me. Those two things right. And that you do a job that's not unlike mine. And here's a couple of ideas, Betty Crocker recipes that I can just grab and do. And you might say things about teachers like "they just want it to be easy". They need it to be easy, they are up to their armpits in alligators there's no time to drain the swamp. They need a solution, they need a simple thing they can do tomorrow, not real high stakes, I'm going to try this. 

And I always tell teachers if you try this have plan B in your back pocket. Or at this conference, or with the web, we're having issues with the web if that's a deal breaker then we are all doomed. But we have other ways, you always do that, that's always been necessary. So tell teachers it's okay if you need to punt. If the thing you plan doesn't work what's plan B so you don't have an aneurysm when it all doesn't work. 

And we need to help each other and what I say, if I tell you, you have to do everything I just taught you and remember all of it, come on, who can do that. Pick one thing, one thing. A movement is a movement, that means there's movement right. So pick one thing you heard today and do something that matters for kids. You do this, she'll do that, he'll do that and we'll help each other. You show me how to do that, I'll show you, as a community. You see how community is essential, it's essential. And I think we used to lock our classroom door and just live inside that room. And the kids only got what you have here right. And that was a benevolent act we did the best we could but it assumed that one person was this amazing expert. And that's over now. Knowledge is ubiquitous. What kids need is to be guided, to learn how to learn, so whatever stands in your way, knock it down. Leverage social networks, leverage the power of community, and as a family we can do right by kids. 

Date added: 18/01/2013

Inviting teachers into the light

Kevin Honeycutt was a keynote speaker at ULearn12. In this talk he provides some ideas for how to work alongside teachers as they explore the tools and ideas available to them to make a difference for their kids. 

Views 14,982 Date added: 18/01/2013

Inviting teachers into the light

Okay so a big part of my job is to stand in front of audiences, and I get paid to make people 'want to'. That's what teachers do. I just do that with teachers now. So when I speak to teachers I am opening cognitive cell doors for students who are in their charge. This is anointed work for me, but let me give you a Swiss army knife that works. I've spoken to so many people in so many places. How do you move a culture? Especially when it has to move. Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic doesn't do much for the iceberg right. So we've got to move. So how do we do that.

You're talking to an audience, a bunch of tired teachers. First of all, honour them. They are doing the best they can with what they have. Invite them don't indite them. So what I like to do is show models. Here's a glowing model. I never say "You're not doing this" or that "You should do this". I don't wag my finger. I say "look at this beautiful thing, isn't this a wonderful thing". I shine a light up here and I invite you without saying it, into the light here.

So I tell stories and stories are powerful. We are stories. That's what we are. Our brain remembers stories up to the day we die. We are a collection of stories so acknowledge that. So where are your stories? Stories of transformation, beautiful heroic stories. And by the way they can't be 30 minutes or an hour, they've got to be 2 minutes. I know but they've got to be.

So you've got stories, you all do, collect them, collect them, they move hearts and minds. So share those stories and don't be humble about it. You've got great things going in your schools, but I bet no one's getting the story. Well we have devices everywhere with cameras, let's do this. Where are the student film crews following the stories. And even if you can't edit it today at least you've got it. You are doing these great things and you rarely get evidence and evidence is what makes it possible to to build capacity to keep serving children, It is the cost of admission. It's getting easier now.

So when I'm talking to a group of people I tell them stories. First I connect to them and let them know that I'm like them. I'm not some person over here who has a million things I'm going to talk about. I actually do the things I say. Make sure you do that. Be real, get into classrooms, try these, with tough kids, with gifted kids, try these things. And tell the story, what worked, what didn't work, that's okay to talk about what didn't work too, we learn from failure. And then they know that it may not work for them but that's okay. I guess be human in front of a group.

They don't care, authority doesn't come from expertise. It comes from trusting that you're like me and that you like me. Those two things right. And that you do a job that's not unlike mine. And here's a couple of ideas, Betty Crocker recipes that I can just grab and do. And you might say things about teachers like "they just want it to be easy". They need it to be easy, they are up to their armpits in alligators there's no time to drain the swamp. They need a solution, they need a simple thing they can do tomorrow, not real high stakes, I'm going to try this. 

And I always tell teachers if you try this have plan B in your back pocket. Or at this conference, or with the web, we're having issues with the web if that's a deal breaker then we are all doomed. But we have other ways, you always do that, that's always been necessary. So tell teachers it's okay if you need to punt. If the thing you plan doesn't work what's plan B so you don't have an aneurysm when it all doesn't work. 

And we need to help each other and what I say, if I tell you, you have to do everything I just taught you and remember all of it, come on, who can do that. Pick one thing, one thing. A movement is a movement, that means there's movement right. So pick one thing you heard today and do something that matters for kids. You do this, she'll do that, he'll do that and we'll help each other. You show me how to do that, I'll show you, as a community. You see how community is essential, it's essential. And I think we used to lock our classroom door and just live inside that room. And the kids only got what you have here right. And that was a benevolent act we did the best we could but it assumed that one person was this amazing expert. And that's over now. Knowledge is ubiquitous. What kids need is to be guided, to learn how to learn, so whatever stands in your way, knock it down. Leverage social networks, leverage the power of community, and as a family we can do right by kids. 

Okay so a big part of my job is to stand in front of audiences, and I get paid to make people 'want to'. That's what teachers do. I just do that with teachers now. So when I speak to teachers I am opening cognitive cell doors for students who are in their charge. This is anointed work for me, but let me give you a Swiss army knife that works. I've spoken to so many people in so many places. How do you move a culture? Especially when it has to move. Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic doesn't do much for the iceberg right. So we've got to move. So how do we do that.

You're talking to an audience, a bunch of tired teachers. First of all, honour them. They are doing the best they can with what they have. Invite them don't indite them. So what I like to do is show models. Here's a glowing model. I never say "You're not doing this" or that "You should do this". I don't wag my finger. I say "look at this beautiful thing, isn't this a wonderful thing". I shine a light up here and I invite you without saying it, into the light here.

So I tell stories and stories are powerful. We are stories. That's what we are. Our brain remembers stories up to the day we die. We are a collection of stories so acknowledge that. So where are your stories? Stories of transformation, beautiful heroic stories. And by the way they can't be 30 minutes or an hour, they've got to be 2 minutes. I know but they've got to be.

So you've got stories, you all do, collect them, collect them, they move hearts and minds. So share those stories and don't be humble about it. You've got great things going in your schools, but I bet no one's getting the story. Well we have devices everywhere with cameras, let's do this. Where are the student film crews following the stories. And even if you can't edit it today at least you've got it. You are doing these great things and you rarely get evidence and evidence is what makes it possible to to build capacity to keep serving children, It is the cost of admission. It's getting easier now.

So when I'm talking to a group of people I tell them stories. First I connect to them and let them know that I'm like them. I'm not some person over here who has a million things I'm going to talk about. I actually do the things I say. Make sure you do that. Be real, get into classrooms, try these, with tough kids, with gifted kids, try these things. And tell the story, what worked, what didn't work, that's okay to talk about what didn't work too, we learn from failure. And then they know that it may not work for them but that's okay. I guess be human in front of a group.

They don't care, authority doesn't come from expertise. It comes from trusting that you're like me and that you like me. Those two things right. And that you do a job that's not unlike mine. And here's a couple of ideas, Betty Crocker recipes that I can just grab and do. And you might say things about teachers like "they just want it to be easy". They need it to be easy, they are up to their armpits in alligators there's no time to drain the swamp. They need a solution, they need a simple thing they can do tomorrow, not real high stakes, I'm going to try this. 

And I always tell teachers if you try this have plan B in your back pocket. Or at this conference, or with the web, we're having issues with the web if that's a deal breaker then we are all doomed. But we have other ways, you always do that, that's always been necessary. So tell teachers it's okay if you need to punt. If the thing you plan doesn't work what's plan B so you don't have an aneurysm when it all doesn't work. 

And we need to help each other and what I say, if I tell you, you have to do everything I just taught you and remember all of it, come on, who can do that. Pick one thing, one thing. A movement is a movement, that means there's movement right. So pick one thing you heard today and do something that matters for kids. You do this, she'll do that, he'll do that and we'll help each other. You show me how to do that, I'll show you, as a community. You see how community is essential, it's essential. And I think we used to lock our classroom door and just live inside that room. And the kids only got what you have here right. And that was a benevolent act we did the best we could but it assumed that one person was this amazing expert. And that's over now. Knowledge is ubiquitous. What kids need is to be guided, to learn how to learn, so whatever stands in your way, knock it down. Leverage social networks, leverage the power of community, and as a family we can do right by kids. 

Date added: 18/01/2013

You can find out more about Kevin on his website >>

The ULearn12 channel has many more videos recorded at the conference. 

 

Find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

Related talks

Content
Latest Content

New content on the way from the World Literacy Summit, and many more NZ educators talking about learning.

The numbers
Total viewed videos: 9,085,537
Total videos: 543