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Speaker: Matt Richards

Matt Richards from Mindlab talks about Mineclass. Mineclass is an international shared learning project in Minecraft. Matt says that one of the challenges for teachers with games based learning, is that a many of them are not gamers, and don't really understand gaming formats. Mineclass is a way of encouraging non-hierarchal learning where teachers could learn from students, and students could learn from teachers, and everyone can play to their strengths. So children know how to use Minecraft, and teachers know how to structure a project, how to collaborate globally, and how to prototype and use design thinking to improve creations. So the students run the website, mineclass.org, Matt helps connect the educators and the students from different countries to participate in the project, and the result is, in Matt’s words “an experiment in awesomeness”.

Views 3,680
Date added: 14 Dec 2015
Duration: 3:56

Mineclass is an experiment in awesomeness. It's a way of exploring student self directed learning. So in Mineclass, which uses Minecraft as the platform, students really run the show. They set the challenges, and they teach the teachers how to do Minecraft. Teachers in Mineclass focus on things that they're good at, such as design thinking, project based learning, and global collaboration. What's really cool about Mineclass is that we have students and teachers from all around the world participating in a shared Minecraft learning experience. I've been using Minecraft for about four years, I was a primary school teacher, then a secondary teacher before joining the Minelab. We found kids just loved using Minecraft, it was a really engaging way of getting kids to collaborate and code.

So what's cool about Minecraft is that it encourages computational thinking. So it's actually quite complicated if you take it to those higher order challenges. So I'd been collaborating with a colleague down in Melbourne, if you can't tell from the accent, I'm from Australia, I've been here for about six months, in New Zealand. So our two schools which were in two different States, were collaborating on a shared project. The kids were designing their ultimate school of the future, then every Friday they were Skyping together face to face, and we thought this was kind of awesome that they could work collaboratively in a virtual space and then talk face to face through the magic mirror of a television with a webcam. So when I became a Microsoft innovative educator expert last year, I was talking to teachers from across Australia, New Zealand. We decided to expand it to be a global project and to let students and teachers from any country all around the world participate in a games based environment. So that's how it started and now the students literally run the show. So they run the website, mineclass.org, and I just help connect the educators and the students from different countries to participate in the project. One of the challenges for teachers today, particularly with games based learning, is that a lot of teachers aren't gamers, so they don't really understand gaming formats.

So what we were trying to achieve with Mineclass  was a way of encouraging this concept of a ako, non-hierarchal learning arrangement where teachers could learn from students, and students could learn from teachers, and we could all play to our strengths. So in Minecraft, kids know how to do Minecraft, they're really good at it, and teachers know how to structure a project, or how to collaborate globally, or how to prototype and use design thinking to improve creations. So that's the potential I think, of something like Minecraft, is that everyone can play to their strengths and we can all learn from it together. What I find is that a lot of teachers or parents who have set ways of thinking about gaming and Minecraft, they think of gaming as something that teenage boys do in dark rooms that's not educational at all. But what I would say is try something, and then have an opinion. What I've found is with my six year old daughter, creating structures with her, has shown me how amazing games can be.

So I'd say just give it a go, and play, let yourself have some fun.

Mineclass is an experiment in awesomeness. It's a way of exploring student self directed learning. So in Mineclass, which uses Minecraft as the platform, students really run the show. They set the challenges, and they teach the teachers how to do Minecraft. Teachers in Mineclass focus on things that they're good at, such as design thinking, project based learning, and global collaboration. What's really cool about Mineclass is that we have students and teachers from all around the world participating in a shared Minecraft learning experience. I've been using Minecraft for about four years, I was a primary school teacher, then a secondary teacher before joining the Minelab. We found kids just loved using Minecraft, it was a really engaging way of getting kids to collaborate and code.

So what's cool about Minecraft is that it encourages computational thinking. So it's actually quite complicated if you take it to those higher order challenges. So I'd been collaborating with a colleague down in Melbourne, if you can't tell from the accent, I'm from Australia, I've been here for about six months, in New Zealand. So our two schools which were in two different States, were collaborating on a shared project. The kids were designing their ultimate school of the future, then every Friday they were Skyping together face to face, and we thought this was kind of awesome that they could work collaboratively in a virtual space and then talk face to face through the magic mirror of a television with a webcam. So when I became a Microsoft innovative educator expert last year, I was talking to teachers from across Australia, New Zealand. We decided to expand it to be a global project and to let students and teachers from any country all around the world participate in a games based environment. So that's how it started and now the students literally run the show. So they run the website, mineclass.org, and I just help connect the educators and the students from different countries to participate in the project. One of the challenges for teachers today, particularly with games based learning, is that a lot of teachers aren't gamers, so they don't really understand gaming formats.

So what we were trying to achieve with Mineclass  was a way of encouraging this concept of a ako, non-hierarchal learning arrangement where teachers could learn from students, and students could learn from teachers, and we could all play to our strengths. So in Minecraft, kids know how to do Minecraft, they're really good at it, and teachers know how to structure a project, or how to collaborate globally, or how to prototype and use design thinking to improve creations. So that's the potential I think, of something like Minecraft, is that everyone can play to their strengths and we can all learn from it together. What I find is that a lot of teachers or parents who have set ways of thinking about gaming and Minecraft, they think of gaming as something that teenage boys do in dark rooms that's not educational at all. But what I would say is try something, and then have an opinion. What I've found is with my six year old daughter, creating structures with her, has shown me how amazing games can be.

So I'd say just give it a go, and play, let yourself have some fun.

Date added: 12/14/2015

Mineclass - student directed, play-based learning

Matt Richards from Mindlab talks about Mineclass. Mineclass is an international shared learning project in Minecraft. Matt says that one of the challenges for teachers with games based learning, is that a many of them are not gamers, and don't really understand gaming formats. Mineclass is a way of encouraging non-hierarchal learning where teachers could learn from students, and students could learn from teachers, and everyone can play to their strengths. So children know how to use Minecraft, and teachers know how to structure a project, how to collaborate globally, and how to prototype and use design thinking to improve creations. So the students run the website, mineclass.org, Matt helps connect the educators and the students from different countries to participate in the project, and the result is, in Matt’s words “an experiment in awesomeness”.

Views 3,680 Date added: 14/12/2015

Mineclass - student directed, play-based learning

Mineclass is an experiment in awesomeness. It's a way of exploring student self directed learning. So in Mineclass, which uses Minecraft as the platform, students really run the show. They set the challenges, and they teach the teachers how to do Minecraft. Teachers in Mineclass focus on things that they're good at, such as design thinking, project based learning, and global collaboration. What's really cool about Mineclass is that we have students and teachers from all around the world participating in a shared Minecraft learning experience. I've been using Minecraft for about four years, I was a primary school teacher, then a secondary teacher before joining the Minelab. We found kids just loved using Minecraft, it was a really engaging way of getting kids to collaborate and code.

So what's cool about Minecraft is that it encourages computational thinking. So it's actually quite complicated if you take it to those higher order challenges. So I'd been collaborating with a colleague down in Melbourne, if you can't tell from the accent, I'm from Australia, I've been here for about six months, in New Zealand. So our two schools which were in two different States, were collaborating on a shared project. The kids were designing their ultimate school of the future, then every Friday they were Skyping together face to face, and we thought this was kind of awesome that they could work collaboratively in a virtual space and then talk face to face through the magic mirror of a television with a webcam. So when I became a Microsoft innovative educator expert last year, I was talking to teachers from across Australia, New Zealand. We decided to expand it to be a global project and to let students and teachers from any country all around the world participate in a games based environment. So that's how it started and now the students literally run the show. So they run the website, mineclass.org, and I just help connect the educators and the students from different countries to participate in the project. One of the challenges for teachers today, particularly with games based learning, is that a lot of teachers aren't gamers, so they don't really understand gaming formats.

So what we were trying to achieve with Mineclass  was a way of encouraging this concept of a ako, non-hierarchal learning arrangement where teachers could learn from students, and students could learn from teachers, and we could all play to our strengths. So in Minecraft, kids know how to do Minecraft, they're really good at it, and teachers know how to structure a project, or how to collaborate globally, or how to prototype and use design thinking to improve creations. So that's the potential I think, of something like Minecraft, is that everyone can play to their strengths and we can all learn from it together. What I find is that a lot of teachers or parents who have set ways of thinking about gaming and Minecraft, they think of gaming as something that teenage boys do in dark rooms that's not educational at all. But what I would say is try something, and then have an opinion. What I've found is with my six year old daughter, creating structures with her, has shown me how amazing games can be.

So I'd say just give it a go, and play, let yourself have some fun.

Mineclass is an experiment in awesomeness. It's a way of exploring student self directed learning. So in Mineclass, which uses Minecraft as the platform, students really run the show. They set the challenges, and they teach the teachers how to do Minecraft. Teachers in Mineclass focus on things that they're good at, such as design thinking, project based learning, and global collaboration. What's really cool about Mineclass is that we have students and teachers from all around the world participating in a shared Minecraft learning experience. I've been using Minecraft for about four years, I was a primary school teacher, then a secondary teacher before joining the Minelab. We found kids just loved using Minecraft, it was a really engaging way of getting kids to collaborate and code.

So what's cool about Minecraft is that it encourages computational thinking. So it's actually quite complicated if you take it to those higher order challenges. So I'd been collaborating with a colleague down in Melbourne, if you can't tell from the accent, I'm from Australia, I've been here for about six months, in New Zealand. So our two schools which were in two different States, were collaborating on a shared project. The kids were designing their ultimate school of the future, then every Friday they were Skyping together face to face, and we thought this was kind of awesome that they could work collaboratively in a virtual space and then talk face to face through the magic mirror of a television with a webcam. So when I became a Microsoft innovative educator expert last year, I was talking to teachers from across Australia, New Zealand. We decided to expand it to be a global project and to let students and teachers from any country all around the world participate in a games based environment. So that's how it started and now the students literally run the show. So they run the website, mineclass.org, and I just help connect the educators and the students from different countries to participate in the project. One of the challenges for teachers today, particularly with games based learning, is that a lot of teachers aren't gamers, so they don't really understand gaming formats.

So what we were trying to achieve with Mineclass  was a way of encouraging this concept of a ako, non-hierarchal learning arrangement where teachers could learn from students, and students could learn from teachers, and we could all play to our strengths. So in Minecraft, kids know how to do Minecraft, they're really good at it, and teachers know how to structure a project, or how to collaborate globally, or how to prototype and use design thinking to improve creations. So that's the potential I think, of something like Minecraft, is that everyone can play to their strengths and we can all learn from it together. What I find is that a lot of teachers or parents who have set ways of thinking about gaming and Minecraft, they think of gaming as something that teenage boys do in dark rooms that's not educational at all. But what I would say is try something, and then have an opinion. What I've found is with my six year old daughter, creating structures with her, has shown me how amazing games can be.

So I'd say just give it a go, and play, let yourself have some fun.

Date added: 14/12/2015

Mineclass - student directed, play-based learning

Matt Richards from Mindlab talks about Mineclass. Mineclass is an international shared learning project in Minecraft. Matt says that one of the challenges for teachers with games based learning, is that a many of them are not gamers, and don't really understand gaming formats. Mineclass is a way of encouraging non-hierarchal learning where teachers could learn from students, and students could learn from teachers, and everyone can play to their strengths. So children know how to use Minecraft, and teachers know how to structure a project, how to collaborate globally, and how to prototype and use design thinking to improve creations. So the students run the website, mineclass.org, Matt helps connect the educators and the students from different countries to participate in the project, and the result is, in Matt’s words “an experiment in awesomeness”.

Views 3,680 Date added: 14/12/2015

Mineclass - student directed, play-based learning

Mineclass is an experiment in awesomeness. It's a way of exploring student self directed learning. So in Mineclass, which uses Minecraft as the platform, students really run the show. They set the challenges, and they teach the teachers how to do Minecraft. Teachers in Mineclass focus on things that they're good at, such as design thinking, project based learning, and global collaboration. What's really cool about Mineclass is that we have students and teachers from all around the world participating in a shared Minecraft learning experience. I've been using Minecraft for about four years, I was a primary school teacher, then a secondary teacher before joining the Minelab. We found kids just loved using Minecraft, it was a really engaging way of getting kids to collaborate and code.

So what's cool about Minecraft is that it encourages computational thinking. So it's actually quite complicated if you take it to those higher order challenges. So I'd been collaborating with a colleague down in Melbourne, if you can't tell from the accent, I'm from Australia, I've been here for about six months, in New Zealand. So our two schools which were in two different States, were collaborating on a shared project. The kids were designing their ultimate school of the future, then every Friday they were Skyping together face to face, and we thought this was kind of awesome that they could work collaboratively in a virtual space and then talk face to face through the magic mirror of a television with a webcam. So when I became a Microsoft innovative educator expert last year, I was talking to teachers from across Australia, New Zealand. We decided to expand it to be a global project and to let students and teachers from any country all around the world participate in a games based environment. So that's how it started and now the students literally run the show. So they run the website, mineclass.org, and I just help connect the educators and the students from different countries to participate in the project. One of the challenges for teachers today, particularly with games based learning, is that a lot of teachers aren't gamers, so they don't really understand gaming formats.

So what we were trying to achieve with Mineclass  was a way of encouraging this concept of a ako, non-hierarchal learning arrangement where teachers could learn from students, and students could learn from teachers, and we could all play to our strengths. So in Minecraft, kids know how to do Minecraft, they're really good at it, and teachers know how to structure a project, or how to collaborate globally, or how to prototype and use design thinking to improve creations. So that's the potential I think, of something like Minecraft, is that everyone can play to their strengths and we can all learn from it together. What I find is that a lot of teachers or parents who have set ways of thinking about gaming and Minecraft, they think of gaming as something that teenage boys do in dark rooms that's not educational at all. But what I would say is try something, and then have an opinion. What I've found is with my six year old daughter, creating structures with her, has shown me how amazing games can be.

So I'd say just give it a go, and play, let yourself have some fun.

Mineclass is an experiment in awesomeness. It's a way of exploring student self directed learning. So in Mineclass, which uses Minecraft as the platform, students really run the show. They set the challenges, and they teach the teachers how to do Minecraft. Teachers in Mineclass focus on things that they're good at, such as design thinking, project based learning, and global collaboration. What's really cool about Mineclass is that we have students and teachers from all around the world participating in a shared Minecraft learning experience. I've been using Minecraft for about four years, I was a primary school teacher, then a secondary teacher before joining the Minelab. We found kids just loved using Minecraft, it was a really engaging way of getting kids to collaborate and code.

So what's cool about Minecraft is that it encourages computational thinking. So it's actually quite complicated if you take it to those higher order challenges. So I'd been collaborating with a colleague down in Melbourne, if you can't tell from the accent, I'm from Australia, I've been here for about six months, in New Zealand. So our two schools which were in two different States, were collaborating on a shared project. The kids were designing their ultimate school of the future, then every Friday they were Skyping together face to face, and we thought this was kind of awesome that they could work collaboratively in a virtual space and then talk face to face through the magic mirror of a television with a webcam. So when I became a Microsoft innovative educator expert last year, I was talking to teachers from across Australia, New Zealand. We decided to expand it to be a global project and to let students and teachers from any country all around the world participate in a games based environment. So that's how it started and now the students literally run the show. So they run the website, mineclass.org, and I just help connect the educators and the students from different countries to participate in the project. One of the challenges for teachers today, particularly with games based learning, is that a lot of teachers aren't gamers, so they don't really understand gaming formats.

So what we were trying to achieve with Mineclass  was a way of encouraging this concept of a ako, non-hierarchal learning arrangement where teachers could learn from students, and students could learn from teachers, and we could all play to our strengths. So in Minecraft, kids know how to do Minecraft, they're really good at it, and teachers know how to structure a project, or how to collaborate globally, or how to prototype and use design thinking to improve creations. So that's the potential I think, of something like Minecraft, is that everyone can play to their strengths and we can all learn from it together. What I find is that a lot of teachers or parents who have set ways of thinking about gaming and Minecraft, they think of gaming as something that teenage boys do in dark rooms that's not educational at all. But what I would say is try something, and then have an opinion. What I've found is with my six year old daughter, creating structures with her, has shown me how amazing games can be.

So I'd say just give it a go, and play, let yourself have some fun.

Date added: 14/12/2015

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