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Speaker: Linda Lehrke

Linda Lehrke from Hingaia Peninsula School, and 2011 eFellow, takes a different slant on the 'flipped classroom'. Linda argues that we talk a lot about how school has changed, society has changed, technology has changed, but more focus needs to be placed on how students have changed, and the implications.

Views 16,682
Date added: 24 Jan 2013
Duration: 5:52

I'm Linda Lehrke. I'm currently teaching at Hingaia Peninsula School. In 2012 I was an eFellow and had a fabulous journey of learning and becoming part of an awesome community.

I'm going to talk about, I suppose, like the flipped classroom, but the flipped focus from the world to the student. So rather than focusing on how the world has changed, focusing on how the students have changed. 

I had a lovely discussion recently with a woman who was sharing a story about her four year old who had come home from Kindergarten, and the standard question "What did you learn today?" or "How was Kindy today?" And he goes "I had a really great time at kindy". And she said, "What did you learn?" And he said, "I learned that if you run really fast you die." She goes, "run really fast and you die, how did that happen?" And he goes, "Well you know if you run really fast you go off the edge of the screen and you die." He had been playing computer games obviously, and it wasn't at kindergarten. But what was interesting was kindergarten was fun but learning happened on the computer in his own time in his own little world. 

And our kids have changed, because if we asked that same question 15 years ago that's not the answer you would get. 

A lot of the material I have read in the last few years has focused on how society has changed from the agricultural age right through to the conceptual age. We focused on how technology's changed, a component of most keynotes you go to starts of with now we remember the brick, the cell phone brick, and right through to 2010 when the iPad arrived, but you don't hear a lot about how kids have changed. We hear a lot about the 1950s classroom and how a teacher from 1050s classroom walks into a classroom today and you know if they put down the chalk and picked up the whiteboard, in a few moments they would be up and running. 

But then you look at someone like Michael J Fox in the 80s who went, in Back to the Future, back to the 1950s, and you know, besides the electric guitar, he fitted in. But if we took a child from today and we put them back into the 1950s what should that look like? He's not going to fit. With his iPhone and his connections he has there, it's more like us from the 80s looking forward in Star Trek.

Kids have changed and we need to start as teachers looking inside to the student instead of outside to the world for change. We have understood the world's changes. But if we want to personalise learning we actually have to start with the person, and that's the child, and understand how they've changed.

Don Tapscott wrote a book and he describes an event that he had with his son, and his son calls him into his bedroom and says, "Dad, dad, have a look at this amazing picture of Jupiter." And Don Tapscott has a look at the picture and it is Jupiter and he says, "Wow isn't it amazing we have created this Hubble telescope that has let us see Jupiter!" And his son looks at him and says, "Dad you've missed the point. Look at the detail of Jupiter, the telescope doesn't matter."

This is how I am different from the kids of today. Because I love the devices. I'm still hooked on the pencil. When we write the writing is really important, the pencil doesn't matter. When kids pick up an iPhone or an iPad, the technology doesn't matter it is what they can do with it. Now we think we're like that but we're not. We are still amazed by the Hubble telescope not by the detail on Jupiter. And our kids just pick up the technology and use it. 

We've got some kids at school at the moment who are using Kindles. And we are exploring how we can use with year 3s, Kindles to support their reading and growing their independence in reading. Now they have taken them home, and you know budgets and all those sorts of things, we don't have the touch screen Kindles. Now their parents have a big issue with it because they can't swipe it. And the kids are going, "but mum you just push this button on the side". And the kids don't have a problem with it, the parents do. And it is that concept of a 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional world. I grew up in a 2 dimensional world, I went to a school that was 2 dimensional, you started at A and went through to the end. We had standardised testing that looked at how efficient our 2 dimensional world is by taking samples. These kids live in a world wide web. It is three dimensional. You know you see the pictures of the web and it is all over the place, and all the interconnections and the nodes. We are still teaching two dimensionally, we're still assessing two dimensionally, the world wide web is messy. The catch phrase I am picking up at this conference says that learning is messy. How many of our classrooms are really tidy, and our assessments are really succinct and pinpointed, and how many of our Einsteins are we failing? Because we are sticking with that model?

I don't have the answers. But I know that we are not reaching enough kids. And I know that we are teaching from the outside in. Our kids are three dimensional, we come from a two dimensional learning environment. We need to change, it is going to be messy, but we will have that next Einstein. 

I'm Linda Lehrke. I'm currently teaching at Hingaia Peninsula School. In 2012 I was an eFellow and had a fabulous journey of learning and becoming part of an awesome community.

I'm going to talk about, I suppose, like the flipped classroom, but the flipped focus from the world to the student. So rather than focusing on how the world has changed, focusing on how the students have changed. 

I had a lovely discussion recently with a woman who was sharing a story about her four year old who had come home from Kindergarten, and the standard question "What did you learn today?" or "How was Kindy today?" And he goes "I had a really great time at kindy". And she said, "What did you learn?" And he said, "I learned that if you run really fast you die." She goes, "run really fast and you die, how did that happen?" And he goes, "Well you know if you run really fast you go off the edge of the screen and you die." He had been playing computer games obviously, and it wasn't at kindergarten. But what was interesting was kindergarten was fun but learning happened on the computer in his own time in his own little world. 

And our kids have changed, because if we asked that same question 15 years ago that's not the answer you would get. 

A lot of the material I have read in the last few years has focused on how society has changed from the agricultural age right through to the conceptual age. We focused on how technology's changed, a component of most keynotes you go to starts of with now we remember the brick, the cell phone brick, and right through to 2010 when the iPad arrived, but you don't hear a lot about how kids have changed. We hear a lot about the 1950s classroom and how a teacher from 1050s classroom walks into a classroom today and you know if they put down the chalk and picked up the whiteboard, in a few moments they would be up and running. 

But then you look at someone like Michael J Fox in the 80s who went, in Back to the Future, back to the 1950s, and you know, besides the electric guitar, he fitted in. But if we took a child from today and we put them back into the 1950s what should that look like? He's not going to fit. With his iPhone and his connections he has there, it's more like us from the 80s looking forward in Star Trek.

Kids have changed and we need to start as teachers looking inside to the student instead of outside to the world for change. We have understood the world's changes. But if we want to personalise learning we actually have to start with the person, and that's the child, and understand how they've changed.

Don Tapscott wrote a book and he describes an event that he had with his son, and his son calls him into his bedroom and says, "Dad, dad, have a look at this amazing picture of Jupiter." And Don Tapscott has a look at the picture and it is Jupiter and he says, "Wow isn't it amazing we have created this Hubble telescope that has let us see Jupiter!" And his son looks at him and says, "Dad you've missed the point. Look at the detail of Jupiter, the telescope doesn't matter."

This is how I am different from the kids of today. Because I love the devices. I'm still hooked on the pencil. When we write the writing is really important, the pencil doesn't matter. When kids pick up an iPhone or an iPad, the technology doesn't matter it is what they can do with it. Now we think we're like that but we're not. We are still amazed by the Hubble telescope not by the detail on Jupiter. And our kids just pick up the technology and use it. 

We've got some kids at school at the moment who are using Kindles. And we are exploring how we can use with year 3s, Kindles to support their reading and growing their independence in reading. Now they have taken them home, and you know budgets and all those sorts of things, we don't have the touch screen Kindles. Now their parents have a big issue with it because they can't swipe it. And the kids are going, "but mum you just push this button on the side". And the kids don't have a problem with it, the parents do. And it is that concept of a 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional world. I grew up in a 2 dimensional world, I went to a school that was 2 dimensional, you started at A and went through to the end. We had standardised testing that looked at how efficient our 2 dimensional world is by taking samples. These kids live in a world wide web. It is three dimensional. You know you see the pictures of the web and it is all over the place, and all the interconnections and the nodes. We are still teaching two dimensionally, we're still assessing two dimensionally, the world wide web is messy. The catch phrase I am picking up at this conference says that learning is messy. How many of our classrooms are really tidy, and our assessments are really succinct and pinpointed, and how many of our Einsteins are we failing? Because we are sticking with that model?

I don't have the answers. But I know that we are not reaching enough kids. And I know that we are teaching from the outside in. Our kids are three dimensional, we come from a two dimensional learning environment. We need to change, it is going to be messy, but we will have that next Einstein. 

Date added: 01/24/2013
Start with the kids
Date added: 01/24/2013

Start with the kids

Linda Lehrke from Hingaia Peninsula School, and 2011 eFellow, takes a different slant on the 'flipped classroom'. Linda argues that we talk a lot about how school has changed, society has changed, technology has changed, but more focus needs to be placed on how students have changed, and the implications.

Views 16,682 Date added: 24/01/2013

Start with the kids

I'm Linda Lehrke. I'm currently teaching at Hingaia Peninsula School. In 2012 I was an eFellow and had a fabulous journey of learning and becoming part of an awesome community.

I'm going to talk about, I suppose, like the flipped classroom, but the flipped focus from the world to the student. So rather than focusing on how the world has changed, focusing on how the students have changed. 

I had a lovely discussion recently with a woman who was sharing a story about her four year old who had come home from Kindergarten, and the standard question "What did you learn today?" or "How was Kindy today?" And he goes "I had a really great time at kindy". And she said, "What did you learn?" And he said, "I learned that if you run really fast you die." She goes, "run really fast and you die, how did that happen?" And he goes, "Well you know if you run really fast you go off the edge of the screen and you die." He had been playing computer games obviously, and it wasn't at kindergarten. But what was interesting was kindergarten was fun but learning happened on the computer in his own time in his own little world. 

And our kids have changed, because if we asked that same question 15 years ago that's not the answer you would get. 

A lot of the material I have read in the last few years has focused on how society has changed from the agricultural age right through to the conceptual age. We focused on how technology's changed, a component of most keynotes you go to starts of with now we remember the brick, the cell phone brick, and right through to 2010 when the iPad arrived, but you don't hear a lot about how kids have changed. We hear a lot about the 1950s classroom and how a teacher from 1050s classroom walks into a classroom today and you know if they put down the chalk and picked up the whiteboard, in a few moments they would be up and running. 

But then you look at someone like Michael J Fox in the 80s who went, in Back to the Future, back to the 1950s, and you know, besides the electric guitar, he fitted in. But if we took a child from today and we put them back into the 1950s what should that look like? He's not going to fit. With his iPhone and his connections he has there, it's more like us from the 80s looking forward in Star Trek.

Kids have changed and we need to start as teachers looking inside to the student instead of outside to the world for change. We have understood the world's changes. But if we want to personalise learning we actually have to start with the person, and that's the child, and understand how they've changed.

Don Tapscott wrote a book and he describes an event that he had with his son, and his son calls him into his bedroom and says, "Dad, dad, have a look at this amazing picture of Jupiter." And Don Tapscott has a look at the picture and it is Jupiter and he says, "Wow isn't it amazing we have created this Hubble telescope that has let us see Jupiter!" And his son looks at him and says, "Dad you've missed the point. Look at the detail of Jupiter, the telescope doesn't matter."

This is how I am different from the kids of today. Because I love the devices. I'm still hooked on the pencil. When we write the writing is really important, the pencil doesn't matter. When kids pick up an iPhone or an iPad, the technology doesn't matter it is what they can do with it. Now we think we're like that but we're not. We are still amazed by the Hubble telescope not by the detail on Jupiter. And our kids just pick up the technology and use it. 

We've got some kids at school at the moment who are using Kindles. And we are exploring how we can use with year 3s, Kindles to support their reading and growing their independence in reading. Now they have taken them home, and you know budgets and all those sorts of things, we don't have the touch screen Kindles. Now their parents have a big issue with it because they can't swipe it. And the kids are going, "but mum you just push this button on the side". And the kids don't have a problem with it, the parents do. And it is that concept of a 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional world. I grew up in a 2 dimensional world, I went to a school that was 2 dimensional, you started at A and went through to the end. We had standardised testing that looked at how efficient our 2 dimensional world is by taking samples. These kids live in a world wide web. It is three dimensional. You know you see the pictures of the web and it is all over the place, and all the interconnections and the nodes. We are still teaching two dimensionally, we're still assessing two dimensionally, the world wide web is messy. The catch phrase I am picking up at this conference says that learning is messy. How many of our classrooms are really tidy, and our assessments are really succinct and pinpointed, and how many of our Einsteins are we failing? Because we are sticking with that model?

I don't have the answers. But I know that we are not reaching enough kids. And I know that we are teaching from the outside in. Our kids are three dimensional, we come from a two dimensional learning environment. We need to change, it is going to be messy, but we will have that next Einstein. 

I'm Linda Lehrke. I'm currently teaching at Hingaia Peninsula School. In 2012 I was an eFellow and had a fabulous journey of learning and becoming part of an awesome community.

I'm going to talk about, I suppose, like the flipped classroom, but the flipped focus from the world to the student. So rather than focusing on how the world has changed, focusing on how the students have changed. 

I had a lovely discussion recently with a woman who was sharing a story about her four year old who had come home from Kindergarten, and the standard question "What did you learn today?" or "How was Kindy today?" And he goes "I had a really great time at kindy". And she said, "What did you learn?" And he said, "I learned that if you run really fast you die." She goes, "run really fast and you die, how did that happen?" And he goes, "Well you know if you run really fast you go off the edge of the screen and you die." He had been playing computer games obviously, and it wasn't at kindergarten. But what was interesting was kindergarten was fun but learning happened on the computer in his own time in his own little world. 

And our kids have changed, because if we asked that same question 15 years ago that's not the answer you would get. 

A lot of the material I have read in the last few years has focused on how society has changed from the agricultural age right through to the conceptual age. We focused on how technology's changed, a component of most keynotes you go to starts of with now we remember the brick, the cell phone brick, and right through to 2010 when the iPad arrived, but you don't hear a lot about how kids have changed. We hear a lot about the 1950s classroom and how a teacher from 1050s classroom walks into a classroom today and you know if they put down the chalk and picked up the whiteboard, in a few moments they would be up and running. 

But then you look at someone like Michael J Fox in the 80s who went, in Back to the Future, back to the 1950s, and you know, besides the electric guitar, he fitted in. But if we took a child from today and we put them back into the 1950s what should that look like? He's not going to fit. With his iPhone and his connections he has there, it's more like us from the 80s looking forward in Star Trek.

Kids have changed and we need to start as teachers looking inside to the student instead of outside to the world for change. We have understood the world's changes. But if we want to personalise learning we actually have to start with the person, and that's the child, and understand how they've changed.

Don Tapscott wrote a book and he describes an event that he had with his son, and his son calls him into his bedroom and says, "Dad, dad, have a look at this amazing picture of Jupiter." And Don Tapscott has a look at the picture and it is Jupiter and he says, "Wow isn't it amazing we have created this Hubble telescope that has let us see Jupiter!" And his son looks at him and says, "Dad you've missed the point. Look at the detail of Jupiter, the telescope doesn't matter."

This is how I am different from the kids of today. Because I love the devices. I'm still hooked on the pencil. When we write the writing is really important, the pencil doesn't matter. When kids pick up an iPhone or an iPad, the technology doesn't matter it is what they can do with it. Now we think we're like that but we're not. We are still amazed by the Hubble telescope not by the detail on Jupiter. And our kids just pick up the technology and use it. 

We've got some kids at school at the moment who are using Kindles. And we are exploring how we can use with year 3s, Kindles to support their reading and growing their independence in reading. Now they have taken them home, and you know budgets and all those sorts of things, we don't have the touch screen Kindles. Now their parents have a big issue with it because they can't swipe it. And the kids are going, "but mum you just push this button on the side". And the kids don't have a problem with it, the parents do. And it is that concept of a 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional world. I grew up in a 2 dimensional world, I went to a school that was 2 dimensional, you started at A and went through to the end. We had standardised testing that looked at how efficient our 2 dimensional world is by taking samples. These kids live in a world wide web. It is three dimensional. You know you see the pictures of the web and it is all over the place, and all the interconnections and the nodes. We are still teaching two dimensionally, we're still assessing two dimensionally, the world wide web is messy. The catch phrase I am picking up at this conference says that learning is messy. How many of our classrooms are really tidy, and our assessments are really succinct and pinpointed, and how many of our Einsteins are we failing? Because we are sticking with that model?

I don't have the answers. But I know that we are not reaching enough kids. And I know that we are teaching from the outside in. Our kids are three dimensional, we come from a two dimensional learning environment. We need to change, it is going to be messy, but we will have that next Einstein. 

Date added: 24/01/2013

Start with the kids

Linda Lehrke from Hingaia Peninsula School, and 2011 eFellow, takes a different slant on the 'flipped classroom'. Linda argues that we talk a lot about how school has changed, society has changed, technology has changed, but more focus needs to be placed on how students have changed, and the implications.

Views 16,682 Date added: 24/01/2013

Start with the kids

I'm Linda Lehrke. I'm currently teaching at Hingaia Peninsula School. In 2012 I was an eFellow and had a fabulous journey of learning and becoming part of an awesome community.

I'm going to talk about, I suppose, like the flipped classroom, but the flipped focus from the world to the student. So rather than focusing on how the world has changed, focusing on how the students have changed. 

I had a lovely discussion recently with a woman who was sharing a story about her four year old who had come home from Kindergarten, and the standard question "What did you learn today?" or "How was Kindy today?" And he goes "I had a really great time at kindy". And she said, "What did you learn?" And he said, "I learned that if you run really fast you die." She goes, "run really fast and you die, how did that happen?" And he goes, "Well you know if you run really fast you go off the edge of the screen and you die." He had been playing computer games obviously, and it wasn't at kindergarten. But what was interesting was kindergarten was fun but learning happened on the computer in his own time in his own little world. 

And our kids have changed, because if we asked that same question 15 years ago that's not the answer you would get. 

A lot of the material I have read in the last few years has focused on how society has changed from the agricultural age right through to the conceptual age. We focused on how technology's changed, a component of most keynotes you go to starts of with now we remember the brick, the cell phone brick, and right through to 2010 when the iPad arrived, but you don't hear a lot about how kids have changed. We hear a lot about the 1950s classroom and how a teacher from 1050s classroom walks into a classroom today and you know if they put down the chalk and picked up the whiteboard, in a few moments they would be up and running. 

But then you look at someone like Michael J Fox in the 80s who went, in Back to the Future, back to the 1950s, and you know, besides the electric guitar, he fitted in. But if we took a child from today and we put them back into the 1950s what should that look like? He's not going to fit. With his iPhone and his connections he has there, it's more like us from the 80s looking forward in Star Trek.

Kids have changed and we need to start as teachers looking inside to the student instead of outside to the world for change. We have understood the world's changes. But if we want to personalise learning we actually have to start with the person, and that's the child, and understand how they've changed.

Don Tapscott wrote a book and he describes an event that he had with his son, and his son calls him into his bedroom and says, "Dad, dad, have a look at this amazing picture of Jupiter." And Don Tapscott has a look at the picture and it is Jupiter and he says, "Wow isn't it amazing we have created this Hubble telescope that has let us see Jupiter!" And his son looks at him and says, "Dad you've missed the point. Look at the detail of Jupiter, the telescope doesn't matter."

This is how I am different from the kids of today. Because I love the devices. I'm still hooked on the pencil. When we write the writing is really important, the pencil doesn't matter. When kids pick up an iPhone or an iPad, the technology doesn't matter it is what they can do with it. Now we think we're like that but we're not. We are still amazed by the Hubble telescope not by the detail on Jupiter. And our kids just pick up the technology and use it. 

We've got some kids at school at the moment who are using Kindles. And we are exploring how we can use with year 3s, Kindles to support their reading and growing their independence in reading. Now they have taken them home, and you know budgets and all those sorts of things, we don't have the touch screen Kindles. Now their parents have a big issue with it because they can't swipe it. And the kids are going, "but mum you just push this button on the side". And the kids don't have a problem with it, the parents do. And it is that concept of a 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional world. I grew up in a 2 dimensional world, I went to a school that was 2 dimensional, you started at A and went through to the end. We had standardised testing that looked at how efficient our 2 dimensional world is by taking samples. These kids live in a world wide web. It is three dimensional. You know you see the pictures of the web and it is all over the place, and all the interconnections and the nodes. We are still teaching two dimensionally, we're still assessing two dimensionally, the world wide web is messy. The catch phrase I am picking up at this conference says that learning is messy. How many of our classrooms are really tidy, and our assessments are really succinct and pinpointed, and how many of our Einsteins are we failing? Because we are sticking with that model?

I don't have the answers. But I know that we are not reaching enough kids. And I know that we are teaching from the outside in. Our kids are three dimensional, we come from a two dimensional learning environment. We need to change, it is going to be messy, but we will have that next Einstein. 

I'm Linda Lehrke. I'm currently teaching at Hingaia Peninsula School. In 2012 I was an eFellow and had a fabulous journey of learning and becoming part of an awesome community.

I'm going to talk about, I suppose, like the flipped classroom, but the flipped focus from the world to the student. So rather than focusing on how the world has changed, focusing on how the students have changed. 

I had a lovely discussion recently with a woman who was sharing a story about her four year old who had come home from Kindergarten, and the standard question "What did you learn today?" or "How was Kindy today?" And he goes "I had a really great time at kindy". And she said, "What did you learn?" And he said, "I learned that if you run really fast you die." She goes, "run really fast and you die, how did that happen?" And he goes, "Well you know if you run really fast you go off the edge of the screen and you die." He had been playing computer games obviously, and it wasn't at kindergarten. But what was interesting was kindergarten was fun but learning happened on the computer in his own time in his own little world. 

And our kids have changed, because if we asked that same question 15 years ago that's not the answer you would get. 

A lot of the material I have read in the last few years has focused on how society has changed from the agricultural age right through to the conceptual age. We focused on how technology's changed, a component of most keynotes you go to starts of with now we remember the brick, the cell phone brick, and right through to 2010 when the iPad arrived, but you don't hear a lot about how kids have changed. We hear a lot about the 1950s classroom and how a teacher from 1050s classroom walks into a classroom today and you know if they put down the chalk and picked up the whiteboard, in a few moments they would be up and running. 

But then you look at someone like Michael J Fox in the 80s who went, in Back to the Future, back to the 1950s, and you know, besides the electric guitar, he fitted in. But if we took a child from today and we put them back into the 1950s what should that look like? He's not going to fit. With his iPhone and his connections he has there, it's more like us from the 80s looking forward in Star Trek.

Kids have changed and we need to start as teachers looking inside to the student instead of outside to the world for change. We have understood the world's changes. But if we want to personalise learning we actually have to start with the person, and that's the child, and understand how they've changed.

Don Tapscott wrote a book and he describes an event that he had with his son, and his son calls him into his bedroom and says, "Dad, dad, have a look at this amazing picture of Jupiter." And Don Tapscott has a look at the picture and it is Jupiter and he says, "Wow isn't it amazing we have created this Hubble telescope that has let us see Jupiter!" And his son looks at him and says, "Dad you've missed the point. Look at the detail of Jupiter, the telescope doesn't matter."

This is how I am different from the kids of today. Because I love the devices. I'm still hooked on the pencil. When we write the writing is really important, the pencil doesn't matter. When kids pick up an iPhone or an iPad, the technology doesn't matter it is what they can do with it. Now we think we're like that but we're not. We are still amazed by the Hubble telescope not by the detail on Jupiter. And our kids just pick up the technology and use it. 

We've got some kids at school at the moment who are using Kindles. And we are exploring how we can use with year 3s, Kindles to support their reading and growing their independence in reading. Now they have taken them home, and you know budgets and all those sorts of things, we don't have the touch screen Kindles. Now their parents have a big issue with it because they can't swipe it. And the kids are going, "but mum you just push this button on the side". And the kids don't have a problem with it, the parents do. And it is that concept of a 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional world. I grew up in a 2 dimensional world, I went to a school that was 2 dimensional, you started at A and went through to the end. We had standardised testing that looked at how efficient our 2 dimensional world is by taking samples. These kids live in a world wide web. It is three dimensional. You know you see the pictures of the web and it is all over the place, and all the interconnections and the nodes. We are still teaching two dimensionally, we're still assessing two dimensionally, the world wide web is messy. The catch phrase I am picking up at this conference says that learning is messy. How many of our classrooms are really tidy, and our assessments are really succinct and pinpointed, and how many of our Einsteins are we failing? Because we are sticking with that model?

I don't have the answers. But I know that we are not reaching enough kids. And I know that we are teaching from the outside in. Our kids are three dimensional, we come from a two dimensional learning environment. We need to change, it is going to be messy, but we will have that next Einstein. 

Date added: 24/01/2013

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