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Follow Quinn's writing and online activity at quinnnorton.com

More about NetHui

Follow Quinn's writing and online activity at quinnnorton.com

More about NetHui

Speaker: Quinn Norton

Quinn Norton is a journalist, photographer and blogger. In this EDtalk she calls for a flexible education system that would enable students to be not only literate with technology, but also skilled in gaining new literacies. Quinn advocates a system capable of turning out a generation of hacker kids - people who have the permission and the skills to take apart the world around them, and to put it back together in novel ways with understanding and creativity.

Views 11,691
Date added: 22 Aug 2013
Duration: 6:00

Long before I was a journalist I was in fact a high school and junior high teacher. I’ve taught at various points throughout my career to different groups from 7 to 72 and it’s really given me a passion for trying to understand how people learn and how people have been taught throughout the ages, and it’s interesting right now we’re at a time when we’re kind of at the end of a particular kind of school system, a way of doing education. The education system that we have right now was designed in the 19th century to turn out people who would kind of fit in a cookie cutter, people that could be good employees for factories, for the economic booms of the time, and we still have that system. Right now we need a new way of educating people, a way that’s creative and flexible. We need to get better at  not just teaching people but teaching them how to learn, because what we know now isn’t even going to be useful in a few years, and I think actually what we need to be turning out generations of hacker kids. 

By hackers I don’t mean you know kids that know how to break into servers and websites around the world, I mean people who have permission and the skills to take apart the world around them, to put it together in novel ways, to understand how it works and to get creative with it. A hack as it was traditionally thought of back in the MIT days was just a crazy way of using an existing technology. Take something, use it completely differently. And if you really want to understand the future, don’t look at how people are looking at technology, look at how they are misusing technology. And we need to actually sit down in classrooms and teach our children to misuse technologies in the way that they want to try to do it. We need to push people towards, we need to push children towards finding their own outlets, exploring their own grooves, not just in technology but in a technological world. We need them not to just be literate with the technologies but to be skilled in gaining new literacies. Because like it or not we just don’t live in that formalised, sensible world that actually not just the way we think about education but even the architecture of education is around creating you know, an educational experience that’s uniformed and legible and understandable for the teachers, but right now we need a world full of children misbehaving. Misbehaving in interesting and creative ways. 

You know, as the twentieth century progressed again in education we ended up getting more and more roles for students to play in their own governance. Like we began to see that we would train leaders by making children adopt leadership roles at points, and I think that was a start, I think that was the beginning. Schools need to reconfigure themselves to serve children better, and who better for that task right now than the children that are in those schools. So getting kids involved at every age, with obviously supervision, and remaking what it means to have a classroom, and remaking what it means to have a class. Does it mean that we throw everything out the window? No, but it means a much more heuristic process, something that feels much more, takes in much more response. We already know that a XXX response classroom has more learning going on. 

We’ve got the research now to say that something that engages the students like that where they are involved in the answer making works a lot better than just directing facting at children, just directing information at them in a stream. Humans aren’t sponges. Humans interact with things. So creating spaces where kids can get involved in determining how those spaces are run, you know I think actually when you empower people a lot of those, at any age, even children, a lot of those responsibilities naturally emerge. Maybe that’s somewhat optimistic of me but I have seen children put in a position of responsibility come up with rules that guide their behaviour. In the Brooklyn Free School in New York and, frankly, in communities much closer to where my daughter goes to school, I have noticed that children will place limits on their own screen time. The limits they get from adults are very absolute, like you can or you can’t use it these times, theses times, these times. Children will often when they get together and talk about screens, and I love this, children in my experience refer to all of these devices whether it is this size or a computer or a TV, they refer to them as screens, and it’s great because people do get lost in screens, that’s a good way of describing that. And they talk about like that they’ll have a day with no screens, that they’ll want time with no screens. This is a screen time, this is not a screen time. I think that’s actually a really, really lovely way of doing it, and I’ve tried to pick up on that. 

That’s something I’ve learned from children managing their own behaviour. I think one child managing their own behaviour is about as good as one adult managing their own behaviour. We do these things as communities. We’ve done these things as communities since the dawn of time, and children build rules for themselves out of communities too. I think it’s kind of important to remember that The Lord of the Flies was just a book. And that there are places where children can help design better rules for themselves, especially when they know why. These are not brainless creatures.

Long before I was a journalist I was in fact a high school and junior high teacher. I’ve taught at various points throughout my career to different groups from 7 to 72 and it’s really given me a passion for trying to understand how people learn and how people have been taught throughout the ages, and it’s interesting right now we’re at a time when we’re kind of at the end of a particular kind of school system, a way of doing education. The education system that we have right now was designed in the 19th century to turn out people who would kind of fit in a cookie cutter, people that could be good employees for factories, for the economic booms of the time, and we still have that system. Right now we need a new way of educating people, a way that’s creative and flexible. We need to get better at  not just teaching people but teaching them how to learn, because what we know now isn’t even going to be useful in a few years, and I think actually what we need to be turning out generations of hacker kids. 

By hackers I don’t mean you know kids that know how to break into servers and websites around the world, I mean people who have permission and the skills to take apart the world around them, to put it together in novel ways, to understand how it works and to get creative with it. A hack as it was traditionally thought of back in the MIT days was just a crazy way of using an existing technology. Take something, use it completely differently. And if you really want to understand the future, don’t look at how people are looking at technology, look at how they are misusing technology. And we need to actually sit down in classrooms and teach our children to misuse technologies in the way that they want to try to do it. We need to push people towards, we need to push children towards finding their own outlets, exploring their own grooves, not just in technology but in a technological world. We need them not to just be literate with the technologies but to be skilled in gaining new literacies. Because like it or not we just don’t live in that formalised, sensible world that actually not just the way we think about education but even the architecture of education is around creating you know, an educational experience that’s uniformed and legible and understandable for the teachers, but right now we need a world full of children misbehaving. Misbehaving in interesting and creative ways. 

You know, as the twentieth century progressed again in education we ended up getting more and more roles for students to play in their own governance. Like we began to see that we would train leaders by making children adopt leadership roles at points, and I think that was a start, I think that was the beginning. Schools need to reconfigure themselves to serve children better, and who better for that task right now than the children that are in those schools. So getting kids involved at every age, with obviously supervision, and remaking what it means to have a classroom, and remaking what it means to have a class. Does it mean that we throw everything out the window? No, but it means a much more heuristic process, something that feels much more, takes in much more response. We already know that a XXX response classroom has more learning going on. 

We’ve got the research now to say that something that engages the students like that where they are involved in the answer making works a lot better than just directing facting at children, just directing information at them in a stream. Humans aren’t sponges. Humans interact with things. So creating spaces where kids can get involved in determining how those spaces are run, you know I think actually when you empower people a lot of those, at any age, even children, a lot of those responsibilities naturally emerge. Maybe that’s somewhat optimistic of me but I have seen children put in a position of responsibility come up with rules that guide their behaviour. In the Brooklyn Free School in New York and, frankly, in communities much closer to where my daughter goes to school, I have noticed that children will place limits on their own screen time. The limits they get from adults are very absolute, like you can or you can’t use it these times, theses times, these times. Children will often when they get together and talk about screens, and I love this, children in my experience refer to all of these devices whether it is this size or a computer or a TV, they refer to them as screens, and it’s great because people do get lost in screens, that’s a good way of describing that. And they talk about like that they’ll have a day with no screens, that they’ll want time with no screens. This is a screen time, this is not a screen time. I think that’s actually a really, really lovely way of doing it, and I’ve tried to pick up on that. 

That’s something I’ve learned from children managing their own behaviour. I think one child managing their own behaviour is about as good as one adult managing their own behaviour. We do these things as communities. We’ve done these things as communities since the dawn of time, and children build rules for themselves out of communities too. I think it’s kind of important to remember that The Lord of the Flies was just a book. And that there are places where children can help design better rules for themselves, especially when they know why. These are not brainless creatures.

Date added: 08/22/2013
Students as hackers
Date added: 08/22/2013

Students as hackers

Quinn Norton is a journalist, photographer and blogger. In this EDtalk she calls for a flexible education system that would enable students to be not only literate with technology, but also skilled in gaining new literacies. Quinn advocates a system capable of turning out a generation of hacker kids - people who have the permission and the skills to take apart the world around them, and to put it back together in novel ways with understanding and creativity.

Views 11,691 Date added: 23/08/2013

Students as hackers

Long before I was a journalist I was in fact a high school and junior high teacher. I’ve taught at various points throughout my career to different groups from 7 to 72 and it’s really given me a passion for trying to understand how people learn and how people have been taught throughout the ages, and it’s interesting right now we’re at a time when we’re kind of at the end of a particular kind of school system, a way of doing education. The education system that we have right now was designed in the 19th century to turn out people who would kind of fit in a cookie cutter, people that could be good employees for factories, for the economic booms of the time, and we still have that system. Right now we need a new way of educating people, a way that’s creative and flexible. We need to get better at  not just teaching people but teaching them how to learn, because what we know now isn’t even going to be useful in a few years, and I think actually what we need to be turning out generations of hacker kids. 

By hackers I don’t mean you know kids that know how to break into servers and websites around the world, I mean people who have permission and the skills to take apart the world around them, to put it together in novel ways, to understand how it works and to get creative with it. A hack as it was traditionally thought of back in the MIT days was just a crazy way of using an existing technology. Take something, use it completely differently. And if you really want to understand the future, don’t look at how people are looking at technology, look at how they are misusing technology. And we need to actually sit down in classrooms and teach our children to misuse technologies in the way that they want to try to do it. We need to push people towards, we need to push children towards finding their own outlets, exploring their own grooves, not just in technology but in a technological world. We need them not to just be literate with the technologies but to be skilled in gaining new literacies. Because like it or not we just don’t live in that formalised, sensible world that actually not just the way we think about education but even the architecture of education is around creating you know, an educational experience that’s uniformed and legible and understandable for the teachers, but right now we need a world full of children misbehaving. Misbehaving in interesting and creative ways. 

You know, as the twentieth century progressed again in education we ended up getting more and more roles for students to play in their own governance. Like we began to see that we would train leaders by making children adopt leadership roles at points, and I think that was a start, I think that was the beginning. Schools need to reconfigure themselves to serve children better, and who better for that task right now than the children that are in those schools. So getting kids involved at every age, with obviously supervision, and remaking what it means to have a classroom, and remaking what it means to have a class. Does it mean that we throw everything out the window? No, but it means a much more heuristic process, something that feels much more, takes in much more response. We already know that a XXX response classroom has more learning going on. 

We’ve got the research now to say that something that engages the students like that where they are involved in the answer making works a lot better than just directing facting at children, just directing information at them in a stream. Humans aren’t sponges. Humans interact with things. So creating spaces where kids can get involved in determining how those spaces are run, you know I think actually when you empower people a lot of those, at any age, even children, a lot of those responsibilities naturally emerge. Maybe that’s somewhat optimistic of me but I have seen children put in a position of responsibility come up with rules that guide their behaviour. In the Brooklyn Free School in New York and, frankly, in communities much closer to where my daughter goes to school, I have noticed that children will place limits on their own screen time. The limits they get from adults are very absolute, like you can or you can’t use it these times, theses times, these times. Children will often when they get together and talk about screens, and I love this, children in my experience refer to all of these devices whether it is this size or a computer or a TV, they refer to them as screens, and it’s great because people do get lost in screens, that’s a good way of describing that. And they talk about like that they’ll have a day with no screens, that they’ll want time with no screens. This is a screen time, this is not a screen time. I think that’s actually a really, really lovely way of doing it, and I’ve tried to pick up on that. 

That’s something I’ve learned from children managing their own behaviour. I think one child managing their own behaviour is about as good as one adult managing their own behaviour. We do these things as communities. We’ve done these things as communities since the dawn of time, and children build rules for themselves out of communities too. I think it’s kind of important to remember that The Lord of the Flies was just a book. And that there are places where children can help design better rules for themselves, especially when they know why. These are not brainless creatures.

Long before I was a journalist I was in fact a high school and junior high teacher. I’ve taught at various points throughout my career to different groups from 7 to 72 and it’s really given me a passion for trying to understand how people learn and how people have been taught throughout the ages, and it’s interesting right now we’re at a time when we’re kind of at the end of a particular kind of school system, a way of doing education. The education system that we have right now was designed in the 19th century to turn out people who would kind of fit in a cookie cutter, people that could be good employees for factories, for the economic booms of the time, and we still have that system. Right now we need a new way of educating people, a way that’s creative and flexible. We need to get better at  not just teaching people but teaching them how to learn, because what we know now isn’t even going to be useful in a few years, and I think actually what we need to be turning out generations of hacker kids. 

By hackers I don’t mean you know kids that know how to break into servers and websites around the world, I mean people who have permission and the skills to take apart the world around them, to put it together in novel ways, to understand how it works and to get creative with it. A hack as it was traditionally thought of back in the MIT days was just a crazy way of using an existing technology. Take something, use it completely differently. And if you really want to understand the future, don’t look at how people are looking at technology, look at how they are misusing technology. And we need to actually sit down in classrooms and teach our children to misuse technologies in the way that they want to try to do it. We need to push people towards, we need to push children towards finding their own outlets, exploring their own grooves, not just in technology but in a technological world. We need them not to just be literate with the technologies but to be skilled in gaining new literacies. Because like it or not we just don’t live in that formalised, sensible world that actually not just the way we think about education but even the architecture of education is around creating you know, an educational experience that’s uniformed and legible and understandable for the teachers, but right now we need a world full of children misbehaving. Misbehaving in interesting and creative ways. 

You know, as the twentieth century progressed again in education we ended up getting more and more roles for students to play in their own governance. Like we began to see that we would train leaders by making children adopt leadership roles at points, and I think that was a start, I think that was the beginning. Schools need to reconfigure themselves to serve children better, and who better for that task right now than the children that are in those schools. So getting kids involved at every age, with obviously supervision, and remaking what it means to have a classroom, and remaking what it means to have a class. Does it mean that we throw everything out the window? No, but it means a much more heuristic process, something that feels much more, takes in much more response. We already know that a XXX response classroom has more learning going on. 

We’ve got the research now to say that something that engages the students like that where they are involved in the answer making works a lot better than just directing facting at children, just directing information at them in a stream. Humans aren’t sponges. Humans interact with things. So creating spaces where kids can get involved in determining how those spaces are run, you know I think actually when you empower people a lot of those, at any age, even children, a lot of those responsibilities naturally emerge. Maybe that’s somewhat optimistic of me but I have seen children put in a position of responsibility come up with rules that guide their behaviour. In the Brooklyn Free School in New York and, frankly, in communities much closer to where my daughter goes to school, I have noticed that children will place limits on their own screen time. The limits they get from adults are very absolute, like you can or you can’t use it these times, theses times, these times. Children will often when they get together and talk about screens, and I love this, children in my experience refer to all of these devices whether it is this size or a computer or a TV, they refer to them as screens, and it’s great because people do get lost in screens, that’s a good way of describing that. And they talk about like that they’ll have a day with no screens, that they’ll want time with no screens. This is a screen time, this is not a screen time. I think that’s actually a really, really lovely way of doing it, and I’ve tried to pick up on that. 

That’s something I’ve learned from children managing their own behaviour. I think one child managing their own behaviour is about as good as one adult managing their own behaviour. We do these things as communities. We’ve done these things as communities since the dawn of time, and children build rules for themselves out of communities too. I think it’s kind of important to remember that The Lord of the Flies was just a book. And that there are places where children can help design better rules for themselves, especially when they know why. These are not brainless creatures.

Date added: 23/08/2013

Students as hackers

Quinn Norton is a journalist, photographer and blogger. In this EDtalk she calls for a flexible education system that would enable students to be not only literate with technology, but also skilled in gaining new literacies. Quinn advocates a system capable of turning out a generation of hacker kids - people who have the permission and the skills to take apart the world around them, and to put it back together in novel ways with understanding and creativity.

Views 11,691 Date added: 23/08/2013

Students as hackers

Long before I was a journalist I was in fact a high school and junior high teacher. I’ve taught at various points throughout my career to different groups from 7 to 72 and it’s really given me a passion for trying to understand how people learn and how people have been taught throughout the ages, and it’s interesting right now we’re at a time when we’re kind of at the end of a particular kind of school system, a way of doing education. The education system that we have right now was designed in the 19th century to turn out people who would kind of fit in a cookie cutter, people that could be good employees for factories, for the economic booms of the time, and we still have that system. Right now we need a new way of educating people, a way that’s creative and flexible. We need to get better at  not just teaching people but teaching them how to learn, because what we know now isn’t even going to be useful in a few years, and I think actually what we need to be turning out generations of hacker kids. 

By hackers I don’t mean you know kids that know how to break into servers and websites around the world, I mean people who have permission and the skills to take apart the world around them, to put it together in novel ways, to understand how it works and to get creative with it. A hack as it was traditionally thought of back in the MIT days was just a crazy way of using an existing technology. Take something, use it completely differently. And if you really want to understand the future, don’t look at how people are looking at technology, look at how they are misusing technology. And we need to actually sit down in classrooms and teach our children to misuse technologies in the way that they want to try to do it. We need to push people towards, we need to push children towards finding their own outlets, exploring their own grooves, not just in technology but in a technological world. We need them not to just be literate with the technologies but to be skilled in gaining new literacies. Because like it or not we just don’t live in that formalised, sensible world that actually not just the way we think about education but even the architecture of education is around creating you know, an educational experience that’s uniformed and legible and understandable for the teachers, but right now we need a world full of children misbehaving. Misbehaving in interesting and creative ways. 

You know, as the twentieth century progressed again in education we ended up getting more and more roles for students to play in their own governance. Like we began to see that we would train leaders by making children adopt leadership roles at points, and I think that was a start, I think that was the beginning. Schools need to reconfigure themselves to serve children better, and who better for that task right now than the children that are in those schools. So getting kids involved at every age, with obviously supervision, and remaking what it means to have a classroom, and remaking what it means to have a class. Does it mean that we throw everything out the window? No, but it means a much more heuristic process, something that feels much more, takes in much more response. We already know that a XXX response classroom has more learning going on. 

We’ve got the research now to say that something that engages the students like that where they are involved in the answer making works a lot better than just directing facting at children, just directing information at them in a stream. Humans aren’t sponges. Humans interact with things. So creating spaces where kids can get involved in determining how those spaces are run, you know I think actually when you empower people a lot of those, at any age, even children, a lot of those responsibilities naturally emerge. Maybe that’s somewhat optimistic of me but I have seen children put in a position of responsibility come up with rules that guide their behaviour. In the Brooklyn Free School in New York and, frankly, in communities much closer to where my daughter goes to school, I have noticed that children will place limits on their own screen time. The limits they get from adults are very absolute, like you can or you can’t use it these times, theses times, these times. Children will often when they get together and talk about screens, and I love this, children in my experience refer to all of these devices whether it is this size or a computer or a TV, they refer to them as screens, and it’s great because people do get lost in screens, that’s a good way of describing that. And they talk about like that they’ll have a day with no screens, that they’ll want time with no screens. This is a screen time, this is not a screen time. I think that’s actually a really, really lovely way of doing it, and I’ve tried to pick up on that. 

That’s something I’ve learned from children managing their own behaviour. I think one child managing their own behaviour is about as good as one adult managing their own behaviour. We do these things as communities. We’ve done these things as communities since the dawn of time, and children build rules for themselves out of communities too. I think it’s kind of important to remember that The Lord of the Flies was just a book. And that there are places where children can help design better rules for themselves, especially when they know why. These are not brainless creatures.

Long before I was a journalist I was in fact a high school and junior high teacher. I’ve taught at various points throughout my career to different groups from 7 to 72 and it’s really given me a passion for trying to understand how people learn and how people have been taught throughout the ages, and it’s interesting right now we’re at a time when we’re kind of at the end of a particular kind of school system, a way of doing education. The education system that we have right now was designed in the 19th century to turn out people who would kind of fit in a cookie cutter, people that could be good employees for factories, for the economic booms of the time, and we still have that system. Right now we need a new way of educating people, a way that’s creative and flexible. We need to get better at  not just teaching people but teaching them how to learn, because what we know now isn’t even going to be useful in a few years, and I think actually what we need to be turning out generations of hacker kids. 

By hackers I don’t mean you know kids that know how to break into servers and websites around the world, I mean people who have permission and the skills to take apart the world around them, to put it together in novel ways, to understand how it works and to get creative with it. A hack as it was traditionally thought of back in the MIT days was just a crazy way of using an existing technology. Take something, use it completely differently. And if you really want to understand the future, don’t look at how people are looking at technology, look at how they are misusing technology. And we need to actually sit down in classrooms and teach our children to misuse technologies in the way that they want to try to do it. We need to push people towards, we need to push children towards finding their own outlets, exploring their own grooves, not just in technology but in a technological world. We need them not to just be literate with the technologies but to be skilled in gaining new literacies. Because like it or not we just don’t live in that formalised, sensible world that actually not just the way we think about education but even the architecture of education is around creating you know, an educational experience that’s uniformed and legible and understandable for the teachers, but right now we need a world full of children misbehaving. Misbehaving in interesting and creative ways. 

You know, as the twentieth century progressed again in education we ended up getting more and more roles for students to play in their own governance. Like we began to see that we would train leaders by making children adopt leadership roles at points, and I think that was a start, I think that was the beginning. Schools need to reconfigure themselves to serve children better, and who better for that task right now than the children that are in those schools. So getting kids involved at every age, with obviously supervision, and remaking what it means to have a classroom, and remaking what it means to have a class. Does it mean that we throw everything out the window? No, but it means a much more heuristic process, something that feels much more, takes in much more response. We already know that a XXX response classroom has more learning going on. 

We’ve got the research now to say that something that engages the students like that where they are involved in the answer making works a lot better than just directing facting at children, just directing information at them in a stream. Humans aren’t sponges. Humans interact with things. So creating spaces where kids can get involved in determining how those spaces are run, you know I think actually when you empower people a lot of those, at any age, even children, a lot of those responsibilities naturally emerge. Maybe that’s somewhat optimistic of me but I have seen children put in a position of responsibility come up with rules that guide their behaviour. In the Brooklyn Free School in New York and, frankly, in communities much closer to where my daughter goes to school, I have noticed that children will place limits on their own screen time. The limits they get from adults are very absolute, like you can or you can’t use it these times, theses times, these times. Children will often when they get together and talk about screens, and I love this, children in my experience refer to all of these devices whether it is this size or a computer or a TV, they refer to them as screens, and it’s great because people do get lost in screens, that’s a good way of describing that. And they talk about like that they’ll have a day with no screens, that they’ll want time with no screens. This is a screen time, this is not a screen time. I think that’s actually a really, really lovely way of doing it, and I’ve tried to pick up on that. 

That’s something I’ve learned from children managing their own behaviour. I think one child managing their own behaviour is about as good as one adult managing their own behaviour. We do these things as communities. We’ve done these things as communities since the dawn of time, and children build rules for themselves out of communities too. I think it’s kind of important to remember that The Lord of the Flies was just a book. And that there are places where children can help design better rules for themselves, especially when they know why. These are not brainless creatures.

Date added: 23/08/2013

Follow Quinn's writing and online activity at quinnnorton.com

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