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The CORE blog post for this 2012 trend

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The CORE blog post for this 2012 trend

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

Speaker: DK

CORE Education's Social Media Manager, DK, talks about social learning and how teachers and schools can use social learning in their classrooms as well as in their professional development. 

Views 12,020
Date added: 13 Sep 2012
Duration:

So today I'm going to talk about social learning and have a little bit of a deconstruction about what that means and have a look at the opportunities that I think are really rich in this space around social media. Social media has become kind of very ubiquitous and everyone has access to a network whether that be a traditional one like Linked In or even what we know is very popular like Facebook, or even kind of the more obscure ones like Deviant Art and so on and so forth. So what I am going to talk about is how we can pull out some learning from that and where the educational opportunities are within it.

So let's focus on the students first, specifically we can look at what is very popular with these guys, and Facebook is obviously the first place to start. And are we with them helping them to understand what Facebook is about, are we helping them to navigate the privacy settings within this fantastic social network? Are we as educators as well helping them think about the long term effects of what they do on there? Whether they be negative or even positive as well. Where are the opportunities that we can pull out and how are they sharing their learning, and maybe their own brand as well, their own personal brand that they are building up? Especially at the latter years of their educational years online. And Facebook is the obvious place to start there.

The other side I want to focus on is the resources that kids can actually use and access themselves. And are they thinking about actually sharing their learning into these resources? Stuff like Wikipedia is the obvious one again.  Wikipedia is a fantastic resource, an encyclopedia online that anyone can contribute to and, are we in our schools helping kids to first understand that as a resource? And secondly how they can actually input into it and add their weight and their value into something that is global at the end of the day? 

The other aspect of social learning could come across in looking at what traditional learning has given kids to think about in terms of the just physical textbooks. The physical side of something like textbooks could really be like underlining things and passing them along to their mates. Now think about the textbooks now that are online. Kids can highlight certain chapters and pass it on. Things like Google books or even Kindles and sharing that online but also just sharing stuff like Google Docs and having a collaborative text analysis with a group of young people in a classroom and seeing how the learning is shared and co created or collaborated on, rather than just a siloed one person, or maybe just a couple of people in a small group.

I also want to highlight a really interesting development in the social spaces which is that of existing colleges and universities and other educational institutions putting their content up online. Kind of open sourcing it, open courseware. Like the MITs of this world, the Stanfords, they are putting a lot of their courseware online for anyone in the world to take. But that means also that other educational institutions can pull down from it, and remix it and reposition or even position it in front of their students to help them as a supporitng resource in terms of what they deliver.

So that was very briefly about students but what about teachers and educators. Let's look at them and see how they are actually embracing the social aspects of themselves learning. There is a great quote by Alvin Toffler that I use a lot which is "The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write but will be those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn." And I really think any sector whether you are a teacher or even a clothes manufacturer needs to look at the industry they are in and seeing what the effect the web has had on their new technologies and social media as well. 

So let's start there and talk about what teachers are thinking about in terms of social media and how that effects them as professionals and how they are continuing to learn themselves.

So first of all let's look at teachers and their use of something simple like Twitter, because it is very popular. Twitter is a fantastic resource for connecting with other educators across the globe, but it is also a great resource for sharing your own learning or tapping into existing content that is out there or conversations. For example, if you use the hashtag Edchat that's a global hashtag that anyone can drop into and contribute to about education around the world. But also looking a little bit specific with hashtags you can then follow a conference that is happening on the other side of the planet and pull down from there what people are tweeting out about it. And there is such richness in that when you are kind of dropping into a virtual space but also in terms of history or legacy you can not attend a conference and go back a day or two later and have a look at what people are sharing and learning from that and pull out who the main protagonists are and the main experts in that field.

So I think there is space as well and opportunity to look at how students and teachers work together and reimaging how we look at marking or seeing where learning has happened. For example Youtube, such a great great online resource for teachers to pull some really interesting stuff to start or promote discussion in classrooms with. But what if a student wanted to respond to an exam question or even a course question in a Youtube video? Do teachers now have the literacies to understand that that is A ok, but B can we position that into a curriculum and mark it as such as a credible kind of response to a learning outcome that a student has taken on.

So we talk about Youtube as a resource but there are so many other platforms out there such as Slideshare, Timeline and apps. You've got the RSS feeds, if you don't know what RSS feeds is you are missing out on one of the most richest opportunities on the web which is pulling information to you and filtering out. And again in terms of how we are educating ourselves as professionals. First before then we educate our kids. There are lots of areas we can be using RSS feeds around our subject areas. Pulling down text or ideas or even content we can then push back into the schools and our own curriculum.

And finally I just want to touch on a really interesting development in the social spaces or, I don't know whether to call it social but I think it is, in terms of ecommerce and the kind of crowd funding model, the Kickstarters, the Pledgemes of this world. And the reason I bring it up because it's not, fits neatly within the educational discussion, but I really believe there is a lot of opportunities within business courses within schools that we should be teaching our kids around these open networks where they can post, whether they be their designs, or a new idea for a film or an album, or anything random like a proper business. They can post up there and have the community not only fund it but become a part of their successes in a sense. And again are we teaching ourselves that these platforms exist and then how will we import that into an existing curricular and add in some really diverse opportunities for the kids to become global citizens and global learners in this world.

So today I'm going to talk about social learning and have a little bit of a deconstruction about what that means and have a look at the opportunities that I think are really rich in this space around social media. Social media has become kind of very ubiquitous and everyone has access to a network whether that be a traditional one like Linked In or even what we know is very popular like Facebook, or even kind of the more obscure ones like Deviant Art and so on and so forth. So what I am going to talk about is how we can pull out some learning from that and where the educational opportunities are within it.

So let's focus on the students first, specifically we can look at what is very popular with these guys, and Facebook is obviously the first place to start. And are we with them helping them to understand what Facebook is about, are we helping them to navigate the privacy settings within this fantastic social network? Are we as educators as well helping them think about the long term effects of what they do on there? Whether they be negative or even positive as well. Where are the opportunities that we can pull out and how are they sharing their learning, and maybe their own brand as well, their own personal brand that they are building up? Especially at the latter years of their educational years online. And Facebook is the obvious place to start there.

The other side I want to focus on is the resources that kids can actually use and access themselves. And are they thinking about actually sharing their learning into these resources? Stuff like Wikipedia is the obvious one again.  Wikipedia is a fantastic resource, an encyclopedia online that anyone can contribute to and, are we in our schools helping kids to first understand that as a resource? And secondly how they can actually input into it and add their weight and their value into something that is global at the end of the day? 

The other aspect of social learning could come across in looking at what traditional learning has given kids to think about in terms of the just physical textbooks. The physical side of something like textbooks could really be like underlining things and passing them along to their mates. Now think about the textbooks now that are online. Kids can highlight certain chapters and pass it on. Things like Google books or even Kindles and sharing that online but also just sharing stuff like Google Docs and having a collaborative text analysis with a group of young people in a classroom and seeing how the learning is shared and co created or collaborated on, rather than just a siloed one person, or maybe just a couple of people in a small group.

I also want to highlight a really interesting development in the social spaces which is that of existing colleges and universities and other educational institutions putting their content up online. Kind of open sourcing it, open courseware. Like the MITs of this world, the Stanfords, they are putting a lot of their courseware online for anyone in the world to take. But that means also that other educational institutions can pull down from it, and remix it and reposition or even position it in front of their students to help them as a supporitng resource in terms of what they deliver.

So that was very briefly about students but what about teachers and educators. Let's look at them and see how they are actually embracing the social aspects of themselves learning. There is a great quote by Alvin Toffler that I use a lot which is "The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write but will be those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn." And I really think any sector whether you are a teacher or even a clothes manufacturer needs to look at the industry they are in and seeing what the effect the web has had on their new technologies and social media as well. 

So let's start there and talk about what teachers are thinking about in terms of social media and how that effects them as professionals and how they are continuing to learn themselves.

So first of all let's look at teachers and their use of something simple like Twitter, because it is very popular. Twitter is a fantastic resource for connecting with other educators across the globe, but it is also a great resource for sharing your own learning or tapping into existing content that is out there or conversations. For example, if you use the hashtag Edchat that's a global hashtag that anyone can drop into and contribute to about education around the world. But also looking a little bit specific with hashtags you can then follow a conference that is happening on the other side of the planet and pull down from there what people are tweeting out about it. And there is such richness in that when you are kind of dropping into a virtual space but also in terms of history or legacy you can not attend a conference and go back a day or two later and have a look at what people are sharing and learning from that and pull out who the main protagonists are and the main experts in that field.

So I think there is space as well and opportunity to look at how students and teachers work together and reimaging how we look at marking or seeing where learning has happened. For example Youtube, such a great great online resource for teachers to pull some really interesting stuff to start or promote discussion in classrooms with. But what if a student wanted to respond to an exam question or even a course question in a Youtube video? Do teachers now have the literacies to understand that that is A ok, but B can we position that into a curriculum and mark it as such as a credible kind of response to a learning outcome that a student has taken on.

So we talk about Youtube as a resource but there are so many other platforms out there such as Slideshare, Timeline and apps. You've got the RSS feeds, if you don't know what RSS feeds is you are missing out on one of the most richest opportunities on the web which is pulling information to you and filtering out. And again in terms of how we are educating ourselves as professionals. First before then we educate our kids. There are lots of areas we can be using RSS feeds around our subject areas. Pulling down text or ideas or even content we can then push back into the schools and our own curriculum.

And finally I just want to touch on a really interesting development in the social spaces or, I don't know whether to call it social but I think it is, in terms of ecommerce and the kind of crowd funding model, the Kickstarters, the Pledgemes of this world. And the reason I bring it up because it's not, fits neatly within the educational discussion, but I really believe there is a lot of opportunities within business courses within schools that we should be teaching our kids around these open networks where they can post, whether they be their designs, or a new idea for a film or an album, or anything random like a proper business. They can post up there and have the community not only fund it but become a part of their successes in a sense. And again are we teaching ourselves that these platforms exist and then how will we import that into an existing curricular and add in some really diverse opportunities for the kids to become global citizens and global learners in this world.

Date added: 09/13/2012
Ten Trends 2012: Social learning
Date added: 09/13/2012

Ten Trends 2012: Social learning

CORE Education's Social Media Manager, DK, talks about social learning and how teachers and schools can use social learning in their classrooms as well as in their professional development. 

Views 12,020 Date added: 28/09/2012

Ten Trends 2012: Social learning

So today I'm going to talk about social learning and have a little bit of a deconstruction about what that means and have a look at the opportunities that I think are really rich in this space around social media. Social media has become kind of very ubiquitous and everyone has access to a network whether that be a traditional one like Linked In or even what we know is very popular like Facebook, or even kind of the more obscure ones like Deviant Art and so on and so forth. So what I am going to talk about is how we can pull out some learning from that and where the educational opportunities are within it.

So let's focus on the students first, specifically we can look at what is very popular with these guys, and Facebook is obviously the first place to start. And are we with them helping them to understand what Facebook is about, are we helping them to navigate the privacy settings within this fantastic social network? Are we as educators as well helping them think about the long term effects of what they do on there? Whether they be negative or even positive as well. Where are the opportunities that we can pull out and how are they sharing their learning, and maybe their own brand as well, their own personal brand that they are building up? Especially at the latter years of their educational years online. And Facebook is the obvious place to start there.

The other side I want to focus on is the resources that kids can actually use and access themselves. And are they thinking about actually sharing their learning into these resources? Stuff like Wikipedia is the obvious one again.  Wikipedia is a fantastic resource, an encyclopedia online that anyone can contribute to and, are we in our schools helping kids to first understand that as a resource? And secondly how they can actually input into it and add their weight and their value into something that is global at the end of the day? 

The other aspect of social learning could come across in looking at what traditional learning has given kids to think about in terms of the just physical textbooks. The physical side of something like textbooks could really be like underlining things and passing them along to their mates. Now think about the textbooks now that are online. Kids can highlight certain chapters and pass it on. Things like Google books or even Kindles and sharing that online but also just sharing stuff like Google Docs and having a collaborative text analysis with a group of young people in a classroom and seeing how the learning is shared and co created or collaborated on, rather than just a siloed one person, or maybe just a couple of people in a small group.

I also want to highlight a really interesting development in the social spaces which is that of existing colleges and universities and other educational institutions putting their content up online. Kind of open sourcing it, open courseware. Like the MITs of this world, the Stanfords, they are putting a lot of their courseware online for anyone in the world to take. But that means also that other educational institutions can pull down from it, and remix it and reposition or even position it in front of their students to help them as a supporitng resource in terms of what they deliver.

So that was very briefly about students but what about teachers and educators. Let's look at them and see how they are actually embracing the social aspects of themselves learning. There is a great quote by Alvin Toffler that I use a lot which is "The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write but will be those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn." And I really think any sector whether you are a teacher or even a clothes manufacturer needs to look at the industry they are in and seeing what the effect the web has had on their new technologies and social media as well. 

So let's start there and talk about what teachers are thinking about in terms of social media and how that effects them as professionals and how they are continuing to learn themselves.

So first of all let's look at teachers and their use of something simple like Twitter, because it is very popular. Twitter is a fantastic resource for connecting with other educators across the globe, but it is also a great resource for sharing your own learning or tapping into existing content that is out there or conversations. For example, if you use the hashtag Edchat that's a global hashtag that anyone can drop into and contribute to about education around the world. But also looking a little bit specific with hashtags you can then follow a conference that is happening on the other side of the planet and pull down from there what people are tweeting out about it. And there is such richness in that when you are kind of dropping into a virtual space but also in terms of history or legacy you can not attend a conference and go back a day or two later and have a look at what people are sharing and learning from that and pull out who the main protagonists are and the main experts in that field.

So I think there is space as well and opportunity to look at how students and teachers work together and reimaging how we look at marking or seeing where learning has happened. For example Youtube, such a great great online resource for teachers to pull some really interesting stuff to start or promote discussion in classrooms with. But what if a student wanted to respond to an exam question or even a course question in a Youtube video? Do teachers now have the literacies to understand that that is A ok, but B can we position that into a curriculum and mark it as such as a credible kind of response to a learning outcome that a student has taken on.

So we talk about Youtube as a resource but there are so many other platforms out there such as Slideshare, Timeline and apps. You've got the RSS feeds, if you don't know what RSS feeds is you are missing out on one of the most richest opportunities on the web which is pulling information to you and filtering out. And again in terms of how we are educating ourselves as professionals. First before then we educate our kids. There are lots of areas we can be using RSS feeds around our subject areas. Pulling down text or ideas or even content we can then push back into the schools and our own curriculum.

And finally I just want to touch on a really interesting development in the social spaces or, I don't know whether to call it social but I think it is, in terms of ecommerce and the kind of crowd funding model, the Kickstarters, the Pledgemes of this world. And the reason I bring it up because it's not, fits neatly within the educational discussion, but I really believe there is a lot of opportunities within business courses within schools that we should be teaching our kids around these open networks where they can post, whether they be their designs, or a new idea for a film or an album, or anything random like a proper business. They can post up there and have the community not only fund it but become a part of their successes in a sense. And again are we teaching ourselves that these platforms exist and then how will we import that into an existing curricular and add in some really diverse opportunities for the kids to become global citizens and global learners in this world.

So today I'm going to talk about social learning and have a little bit of a deconstruction about what that means and have a look at the opportunities that I think are really rich in this space around social media. Social media has become kind of very ubiquitous and everyone has access to a network whether that be a traditional one like Linked In or even what we know is very popular like Facebook, or even kind of the more obscure ones like Deviant Art and so on and so forth. So what I am going to talk about is how we can pull out some learning from that and where the educational opportunities are within it.

So let's focus on the students first, specifically we can look at what is very popular with these guys, and Facebook is obviously the first place to start. And are we with them helping them to understand what Facebook is about, are we helping them to navigate the privacy settings within this fantastic social network? Are we as educators as well helping them think about the long term effects of what they do on there? Whether they be negative or even positive as well. Where are the opportunities that we can pull out and how are they sharing their learning, and maybe their own brand as well, their own personal brand that they are building up? Especially at the latter years of their educational years online. And Facebook is the obvious place to start there.

The other side I want to focus on is the resources that kids can actually use and access themselves. And are they thinking about actually sharing their learning into these resources? Stuff like Wikipedia is the obvious one again.  Wikipedia is a fantastic resource, an encyclopedia online that anyone can contribute to and, are we in our schools helping kids to first understand that as a resource? And secondly how they can actually input into it and add their weight and their value into something that is global at the end of the day? 

The other aspect of social learning could come across in looking at what traditional learning has given kids to think about in terms of the just physical textbooks. The physical side of something like textbooks could really be like underlining things and passing them along to their mates. Now think about the textbooks now that are online. Kids can highlight certain chapters and pass it on. Things like Google books or even Kindles and sharing that online but also just sharing stuff like Google Docs and having a collaborative text analysis with a group of young people in a classroom and seeing how the learning is shared and co created or collaborated on, rather than just a siloed one person, or maybe just a couple of people in a small group.

I also want to highlight a really interesting development in the social spaces which is that of existing colleges and universities and other educational institutions putting their content up online. Kind of open sourcing it, open courseware. Like the MITs of this world, the Stanfords, they are putting a lot of their courseware online for anyone in the world to take. But that means also that other educational institutions can pull down from it, and remix it and reposition or even position it in front of their students to help them as a supporitng resource in terms of what they deliver.

So that was very briefly about students but what about teachers and educators. Let's look at them and see how they are actually embracing the social aspects of themselves learning. There is a great quote by Alvin Toffler that I use a lot which is "The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write but will be those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn." And I really think any sector whether you are a teacher or even a clothes manufacturer needs to look at the industry they are in and seeing what the effect the web has had on their new technologies and social media as well. 

So let's start there and talk about what teachers are thinking about in terms of social media and how that effects them as professionals and how they are continuing to learn themselves.

So first of all let's look at teachers and their use of something simple like Twitter, because it is very popular. Twitter is a fantastic resource for connecting with other educators across the globe, but it is also a great resource for sharing your own learning or tapping into existing content that is out there or conversations. For example, if you use the hashtag Edchat that's a global hashtag that anyone can drop into and contribute to about education around the world. But also looking a little bit specific with hashtags you can then follow a conference that is happening on the other side of the planet and pull down from there what people are tweeting out about it. And there is such richness in that when you are kind of dropping into a virtual space but also in terms of history or legacy you can not attend a conference and go back a day or two later and have a look at what people are sharing and learning from that and pull out who the main protagonists are and the main experts in that field.

So I think there is space as well and opportunity to look at how students and teachers work together and reimaging how we look at marking or seeing where learning has happened. For example Youtube, such a great great online resource for teachers to pull some really interesting stuff to start or promote discussion in classrooms with. But what if a student wanted to respond to an exam question or even a course question in a Youtube video? Do teachers now have the literacies to understand that that is A ok, but B can we position that into a curriculum and mark it as such as a credible kind of response to a learning outcome that a student has taken on.

So we talk about Youtube as a resource but there are so many other platforms out there such as Slideshare, Timeline and apps. You've got the RSS feeds, if you don't know what RSS feeds is you are missing out on one of the most richest opportunities on the web which is pulling information to you and filtering out. And again in terms of how we are educating ourselves as professionals. First before then we educate our kids. There are lots of areas we can be using RSS feeds around our subject areas. Pulling down text or ideas or even content we can then push back into the schools and our own curriculum.

And finally I just want to touch on a really interesting development in the social spaces or, I don't know whether to call it social but I think it is, in terms of ecommerce and the kind of crowd funding model, the Kickstarters, the Pledgemes of this world. And the reason I bring it up because it's not, fits neatly within the educational discussion, but I really believe there is a lot of opportunities within business courses within schools that we should be teaching our kids around these open networks where they can post, whether they be their designs, or a new idea for a film or an album, or anything random like a proper business. They can post up there and have the community not only fund it but become a part of their successes in a sense. And again are we teaching ourselves that these platforms exist and then how will we import that into an existing curricular and add in some really diverse opportunities for the kids to become global citizens and global learners in this world.

Date added: 28/09/2012

Ten Trends 2012: Social learning

CORE Education's Social Media Manager, DK, talks about social learning and how teachers and schools can use social learning in their classrooms as well as in their professional development. 

Views 12,020 Date added: 28/09/2012

Ten Trends 2012: Social learning

So today I'm going to talk about social learning and have a little bit of a deconstruction about what that means and have a look at the opportunities that I think are really rich in this space around social media. Social media has become kind of very ubiquitous and everyone has access to a network whether that be a traditional one like Linked In or even what we know is very popular like Facebook, or even kind of the more obscure ones like Deviant Art and so on and so forth. So what I am going to talk about is how we can pull out some learning from that and where the educational opportunities are within it.

So let's focus on the students first, specifically we can look at what is very popular with these guys, and Facebook is obviously the first place to start. And are we with them helping them to understand what Facebook is about, are we helping them to navigate the privacy settings within this fantastic social network? Are we as educators as well helping them think about the long term effects of what they do on there? Whether they be negative or even positive as well. Where are the opportunities that we can pull out and how are they sharing their learning, and maybe their own brand as well, their own personal brand that they are building up? Especially at the latter years of their educational years online. And Facebook is the obvious place to start there.

The other side I want to focus on is the resources that kids can actually use and access themselves. And are they thinking about actually sharing their learning into these resources? Stuff like Wikipedia is the obvious one again.  Wikipedia is a fantastic resource, an encyclopedia online that anyone can contribute to and, are we in our schools helping kids to first understand that as a resource? And secondly how they can actually input into it and add their weight and their value into something that is global at the end of the day? 

The other aspect of social learning could come across in looking at what traditional learning has given kids to think about in terms of the just physical textbooks. The physical side of something like textbooks could really be like underlining things and passing them along to their mates. Now think about the textbooks now that are online. Kids can highlight certain chapters and pass it on. Things like Google books or even Kindles and sharing that online but also just sharing stuff like Google Docs and having a collaborative text analysis with a group of young people in a classroom and seeing how the learning is shared and co created or collaborated on, rather than just a siloed one person, or maybe just a couple of people in a small group.

I also want to highlight a really interesting development in the social spaces which is that of existing colleges and universities and other educational institutions putting their content up online. Kind of open sourcing it, open courseware. Like the MITs of this world, the Stanfords, they are putting a lot of their courseware online for anyone in the world to take. But that means also that other educational institutions can pull down from it, and remix it and reposition or even position it in front of their students to help them as a supporitng resource in terms of what they deliver.

So that was very briefly about students but what about teachers and educators. Let's look at them and see how they are actually embracing the social aspects of themselves learning. There is a great quote by Alvin Toffler that I use a lot which is "The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write but will be those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn." And I really think any sector whether you are a teacher or even a clothes manufacturer needs to look at the industry they are in and seeing what the effect the web has had on their new technologies and social media as well. 

So let's start there and talk about what teachers are thinking about in terms of social media and how that effects them as professionals and how they are continuing to learn themselves.

So first of all let's look at teachers and their use of something simple like Twitter, because it is very popular. Twitter is a fantastic resource for connecting with other educators across the globe, but it is also a great resource for sharing your own learning or tapping into existing content that is out there or conversations. For example, if you use the hashtag Edchat that's a global hashtag that anyone can drop into and contribute to about education around the world. But also looking a little bit specific with hashtags you can then follow a conference that is happening on the other side of the planet and pull down from there what people are tweeting out about it. And there is such richness in that when you are kind of dropping into a virtual space but also in terms of history or legacy you can not attend a conference and go back a day or two later and have a look at what people are sharing and learning from that and pull out who the main protagonists are and the main experts in that field.

So I think there is space as well and opportunity to look at how students and teachers work together and reimaging how we look at marking or seeing where learning has happened. For example Youtube, such a great great online resource for teachers to pull some really interesting stuff to start or promote discussion in classrooms with. But what if a student wanted to respond to an exam question or even a course question in a Youtube video? Do teachers now have the literacies to understand that that is A ok, but B can we position that into a curriculum and mark it as such as a credible kind of response to a learning outcome that a student has taken on.

So we talk about Youtube as a resource but there are so many other platforms out there such as Slideshare, Timeline and apps. You've got the RSS feeds, if you don't know what RSS feeds is you are missing out on one of the most richest opportunities on the web which is pulling information to you and filtering out. And again in terms of how we are educating ourselves as professionals. First before then we educate our kids. There are lots of areas we can be using RSS feeds around our subject areas. Pulling down text or ideas or even content we can then push back into the schools and our own curriculum.

And finally I just want to touch on a really interesting development in the social spaces or, I don't know whether to call it social but I think it is, in terms of ecommerce and the kind of crowd funding model, the Kickstarters, the Pledgemes of this world. And the reason I bring it up because it's not, fits neatly within the educational discussion, but I really believe there is a lot of opportunities within business courses within schools that we should be teaching our kids around these open networks where they can post, whether they be their designs, or a new idea for a film or an album, or anything random like a proper business. They can post up there and have the community not only fund it but become a part of their successes in a sense. And again are we teaching ourselves that these platforms exist and then how will we import that into an existing curricular and add in some really diverse opportunities for the kids to become global citizens and global learners in this world.

So today I'm going to talk about social learning and have a little bit of a deconstruction about what that means and have a look at the opportunities that I think are really rich in this space around social media. Social media has become kind of very ubiquitous and everyone has access to a network whether that be a traditional one like Linked In or even what we know is very popular like Facebook, or even kind of the more obscure ones like Deviant Art and so on and so forth. So what I am going to talk about is how we can pull out some learning from that and where the educational opportunities are within it.

So let's focus on the students first, specifically we can look at what is very popular with these guys, and Facebook is obviously the first place to start. And are we with them helping them to understand what Facebook is about, are we helping them to navigate the privacy settings within this fantastic social network? Are we as educators as well helping them think about the long term effects of what they do on there? Whether they be negative or even positive as well. Where are the opportunities that we can pull out and how are they sharing their learning, and maybe their own brand as well, their own personal brand that they are building up? Especially at the latter years of their educational years online. And Facebook is the obvious place to start there.

The other side I want to focus on is the resources that kids can actually use and access themselves. And are they thinking about actually sharing their learning into these resources? Stuff like Wikipedia is the obvious one again.  Wikipedia is a fantastic resource, an encyclopedia online that anyone can contribute to and, are we in our schools helping kids to first understand that as a resource? And secondly how they can actually input into it and add their weight and their value into something that is global at the end of the day? 

The other aspect of social learning could come across in looking at what traditional learning has given kids to think about in terms of the just physical textbooks. The physical side of something like textbooks could really be like underlining things and passing them along to their mates. Now think about the textbooks now that are online. Kids can highlight certain chapters and pass it on. Things like Google books or even Kindles and sharing that online but also just sharing stuff like Google Docs and having a collaborative text analysis with a group of young people in a classroom and seeing how the learning is shared and co created or collaborated on, rather than just a siloed one person, or maybe just a couple of people in a small group.

I also want to highlight a really interesting development in the social spaces which is that of existing colleges and universities and other educational institutions putting their content up online. Kind of open sourcing it, open courseware. Like the MITs of this world, the Stanfords, they are putting a lot of their courseware online for anyone in the world to take. But that means also that other educational institutions can pull down from it, and remix it and reposition or even position it in front of their students to help them as a supporitng resource in terms of what they deliver.

So that was very briefly about students but what about teachers and educators. Let's look at them and see how they are actually embracing the social aspects of themselves learning. There is a great quote by Alvin Toffler that I use a lot which is "The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write but will be those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn." And I really think any sector whether you are a teacher or even a clothes manufacturer needs to look at the industry they are in and seeing what the effect the web has had on their new technologies and social media as well. 

So let's start there and talk about what teachers are thinking about in terms of social media and how that effects them as professionals and how they are continuing to learn themselves.

So first of all let's look at teachers and their use of something simple like Twitter, because it is very popular. Twitter is a fantastic resource for connecting with other educators across the globe, but it is also a great resource for sharing your own learning or tapping into existing content that is out there or conversations. For example, if you use the hashtag Edchat that's a global hashtag that anyone can drop into and contribute to about education around the world. But also looking a little bit specific with hashtags you can then follow a conference that is happening on the other side of the planet and pull down from there what people are tweeting out about it. And there is such richness in that when you are kind of dropping into a virtual space but also in terms of history or legacy you can not attend a conference and go back a day or two later and have a look at what people are sharing and learning from that and pull out who the main protagonists are and the main experts in that field.

So I think there is space as well and opportunity to look at how students and teachers work together and reimaging how we look at marking or seeing where learning has happened. For example Youtube, such a great great online resource for teachers to pull some really interesting stuff to start or promote discussion in classrooms with. But what if a student wanted to respond to an exam question or even a course question in a Youtube video? Do teachers now have the literacies to understand that that is A ok, but B can we position that into a curriculum and mark it as such as a credible kind of response to a learning outcome that a student has taken on.

So we talk about Youtube as a resource but there are so many other platforms out there such as Slideshare, Timeline and apps. You've got the RSS feeds, if you don't know what RSS feeds is you are missing out on one of the most richest opportunities on the web which is pulling information to you and filtering out. And again in terms of how we are educating ourselves as professionals. First before then we educate our kids. There are lots of areas we can be using RSS feeds around our subject areas. Pulling down text or ideas or even content we can then push back into the schools and our own curriculum.

And finally I just want to touch on a really interesting development in the social spaces or, I don't know whether to call it social but I think it is, in terms of ecommerce and the kind of crowd funding model, the Kickstarters, the Pledgemes of this world. And the reason I bring it up because it's not, fits neatly within the educational discussion, but I really believe there is a lot of opportunities within business courses within schools that we should be teaching our kids around these open networks where they can post, whether they be their designs, or a new idea for a film or an album, or anything random like a proper business. They can post up there and have the community not only fund it but become a part of their successes in a sense. And again are we teaching ourselves that these platforms exist and then how will we import that into an existing curricular and add in some really diverse opportunities for the kids to become global citizens and global learners in this world.

Date added: 28/09/2012

The CORE blog post for this 2012 trend

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