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The 2014 Ten Trends explained

Learner agency

The Bundlr collection of curated links for learner agency

The EDtalks Ten Trends channel
 

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

The 2014 Ten Trends explained

Learner agency

The Bundlr collection of curated links for learner agency

The EDtalks Ten Trends channel
 

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

Speaker: Derek Wenmoth

Derek Wenmoth provides an explanation of learner agency in the first of CORE Education's ten trends for 2014. Derek describes three features: the initiative or self-regulation of the learner, the way agency mediates and is mediated by the sociocultural context of the classroom, and social connectedness - an awareness of the responsibility of one's own actions on others. 

Views 18,778
Date added: 13 Feb 2014
Duration: 5:54

So agency, when someone has agency in their learning, they have the power to act. The key idea really is that learning requires the activity and the initiative of the learner, more than the inputs that are transmitted to the learner from the teacher, from the curriculum, the resources and so forth. In the past in our schools, our schools were designed to cater for groups, for classes of kids, with a one size fits all approach. And arguably, many students felt disenfranchised in the midst of that, as they just had to sit and do what they were told. Lessons were delivered to students and as a result they were just passive in the way that they received that. When learners move from being passive recipients then to being much more active in the learning process, actively involved in the decisions about the learning, then they have agency. So that’s really what agency and the understanding of that’s about. 

Yeah there’s been a lot of talk in the past about learner-centric approaches to education and personalisation, and these are aspects of what we might mean by learner agency, but it is a far deeper, more richer understanding that we have I think. Before a learner chooses to exercise the agency in their particular learning context for example they’ve got to have a personal sense of that agency, a belief that their behaviour and their approach to learning is actually going to make a difference for them in the learning in that setting. Another thing about it is that unlike many peoples perception of learner-centeredness which to them is often about handing everything over to the learner, sort of abdication model, the notion of agency isn’t simply about handing control over to the learner. It involves a far greater tapestry of intentionality if you like on the part of schools and teachers to create that context and environment where the learners are actively involved in the moment by moment learning and well being. It will probably help to think of it this way. 

There are three things that I think are core features of our understanding of learner agency. The first is that agency involves the initiative or self-regulation of the learner. I’ve talked about that. The second though is that agency is interdependent. That is it mediates and is mediated by the sociocultural context of the classroom. So it’s not just about a learner in isolation doing their own thing and what suits them. And the third thing really is that agency includes an awareness of the responsibility of ones own actions on the environment and on others. So there’s a social connectedness kind of dimension to that. You can’t just act selfishly and call that acting with agency. 

The implications of this in our schools are myriad really, and as we think about how our schools are going to be places that will prepare kids for life and work in the 21st century with the 21st century skills and knowledge and innovative approaches and all that sort of thing, we need to be encouraging them to be agentic in their learning, because that’s what they are going to need to be able to do beyond school of course. So in our schools, we need to be considering things that are going to be contributing to that. For instance, what use are we making of IEPs as a way of personalising the approach, not just in terms of the delivery, but in terms of the learners ownership of that learning and the direction for that learning. And as we are doing that, we’ve got to ask ourselves well who will design that IEP, who will be involved in that process, who will have access to that and be responsible for monitoring progress through it. Student voice is another thing that gets reflected here, how is that reflected in the day to day decisions that are made around school. An example I can think of there - BYOD projects that are looming large around schools. There’s a great deal of variance in terms of schools that decide to go down that track and dictate or determine precisely what sort of device it will be, precisely what sort of applications will be used and when and how, through to those that say well actually the intent is to allow individuals to use an individual device to achieve the same level of outputs so the agentic learner will make decisions about a device and the applications that are suitable to their needs. 

One of the things we have to think about is just day to day what’s happening in our classrooms and the extent to which they are teacher-centric versus learners being involved in making those choices and determining. Even things like the curriculum itself and involving learners a lot more in the choices about the what as well as the how and the why of what is being learned. And I guess another thing in terms of schools responsibility in helping learners develop agency in their learning is to consider the safeguards that we need to have in place in that process to make sure no one is falling through the gaps under the guise of just doing my own thing. 

So I think understanding the concept of learner agency is really one of the key differentiating factors in thinking about 21st century learning and teaching. It’s definitely quite a different approach to understand our learners exercising agency in their learning from what it was like when I was at school.

So agency, when someone has agency in their learning, they have the power to act. The key idea really is that learning requires the activity and the initiative of the learner, more than the inputs that are transmitted to the learner from the teacher, from the curriculum, the resources and so forth. In the past in our schools, our schools were designed to cater for groups, for classes of kids, with a one size fits all approach. And arguably, many students felt disenfranchised in the midst of that, as they just had to sit and do what they were told. Lessons were delivered to students and as a result they were just passive in the way that they received that. When learners move from being passive recipients then to being much more active in the learning process, actively involved in the decisions about the learning, then they have agency. So that’s really what agency and the understanding of that’s about. 

Yeah there’s been a lot of talk in the past about learner-centric approaches to education and personalisation, and these are aspects of what we might mean by learner agency, but it is a far deeper, more richer understanding that we have I think. Before a learner chooses to exercise the agency in their particular learning context for example they’ve got to have a personal sense of that agency, a belief that their behaviour and their approach to learning is actually going to make a difference for them in the learning in that setting. Another thing about it is that unlike many peoples perception of learner-centeredness which to them is often about handing everything over to the learner, sort of abdication model, the notion of agency isn’t simply about handing control over to the learner. It involves a far greater tapestry of intentionality if you like on the part of schools and teachers to create that context and environment where the learners are actively involved in the moment by moment learning and well being. It will probably help to think of it this way. 

There are three things that I think are core features of our understanding of learner agency. The first is that agency involves the initiative or self-regulation of the learner. I’ve talked about that. The second though is that agency is interdependent. That is it mediates and is mediated by the sociocultural context of the classroom. So it’s not just about a learner in isolation doing their own thing and what suits them. And the third thing really is that agency includes an awareness of the responsibility of ones own actions on the environment and on others. So there’s a social connectedness kind of dimension to that. You can’t just act selfishly and call that acting with agency. 

The implications of this in our schools are myriad really, and as we think about how our schools are going to be places that will prepare kids for life and work in the 21st century with the 21st century skills and knowledge and innovative approaches and all that sort of thing, we need to be encouraging them to be agentic in their learning, because that’s what they are going to need to be able to do beyond school of course. So in our schools, we need to be considering things that are going to be contributing to that. For instance, what use are we making of IEPs as a way of personalising the approach, not just in terms of the delivery, but in terms of the learners ownership of that learning and the direction for that learning. And as we are doing that, we’ve got to ask ourselves well who will design that IEP, who will be involved in that process, who will have access to that and be responsible for monitoring progress through it. Student voice is another thing that gets reflected here, how is that reflected in the day to day decisions that are made around school. An example I can think of there - BYOD projects that are looming large around schools. There’s a great deal of variance in terms of schools that decide to go down that track and dictate or determine precisely what sort of device it will be, precisely what sort of applications will be used and when and how, through to those that say well actually the intent is to allow individuals to use an individual device to achieve the same level of outputs so the agentic learner will make decisions about a device and the applications that are suitable to their needs. 

One of the things we have to think about is just day to day what’s happening in our classrooms and the extent to which they are teacher-centric versus learners being involved in making those choices and determining. Even things like the curriculum itself and involving learners a lot more in the choices about the what as well as the how and the why of what is being learned. And I guess another thing in terms of schools responsibility in helping learners develop agency in their learning is to consider the safeguards that we need to have in place in that process to make sure no one is falling through the gaps under the guise of just doing my own thing. 

So I think understanding the concept of learner agency is really one of the key differentiating factors in thinking about 21st century learning and teaching. It’s definitely quite a different approach to understand our learners exercising agency in their learning from what it was like when I was at school.

Date added: 02/13/2014
Ten Trends 2014: Agency
Date added: 02/13/2014

Ten Trends 2014: Agency

Derek Wenmoth provides an explanation of learner agency in the first of CORE Education's ten trends for 2014. Derek describes three features: the initiative or self-regulation of the learner, the way agency mediates and is mediated by the sociocultural context of the classroom, and social connectedness - an awareness of the responsibility of one's own actions on others. 

Views 18,778 Date added: 13/02/2014

Ten Trends 2014: Agency

So agency, when someone has agency in their learning, they have the power to act. The key idea really is that learning requires the activity and the initiative of the learner, more than the inputs that are transmitted to the learner from the teacher, from the curriculum, the resources and so forth. In the past in our schools, our schools were designed to cater for groups, for classes of kids, with a one size fits all approach. And arguably, many students felt disenfranchised in the midst of that, as they just had to sit and do what they were told. Lessons were delivered to students and as a result they were just passive in the way that they received that. When learners move from being passive recipients then to being much more active in the learning process, actively involved in the decisions about the learning, then they have agency. So that’s really what agency and the understanding of that’s about. 

Yeah there’s been a lot of talk in the past about learner-centric approaches to education and personalisation, and these are aspects of what we might mean by learner agency, but it is a far deeper, more richer understanding that we have I think. Before a learner chooses to exercise the agency in their particular learning context for example they’ve got to have a personal sense of that agency, a belief that their behaviour and their approach to learning is actually going to make a difference for them in the learning in that setting. Another thing about it is that unlike many peoples perception of learner-centeredness which to them is often about handing everything over to the learner, sort of abdication model, the notion of agency isn’t simply about handing control over to the learner. It involves a far greater tapestry of intentionality if you like on the part of schools and teachers to create that context and environment where the learners are actively involved in the moment by moment learning and well being. It will probably help to think of it this way. 

There are three things that I think are core features of our understanding of learner agency. The first is that agency involves the initiative or self-regulation of the learner. I’ve talked about that. The second though is that agency is interdependent. That is it mediates and is mediated by the sociocultural context of the classroom. So it’s not just about a learner in isolation doing their own thing and what suits them. And the third thing really is that agency includes an awareness of the responsibility of ones own actions on the environment and on others. So there’s a social connectedness kind of dimension to that. You can’t just act selfishly and call that acting with agency. 

The implications of this in our schools are myriad really, and as we think about how our schools are going to be places that will prepare kids for life and work in the 21st century with the 21st century skills and knowledge and innovative approaches and all that sort of thing, we need to be encouraging them to be agentic in their learning, because that’s what they are going to need to be able to do beyond school of course. So in our schools, we need to be considering things that are going to be contributing to that. For instance, what use are we making of IEPs as a way of personalising the approach, not just in terms of the delivery, but in terms of the learners ownership of that learning and the direction for that learning. And as we are doing that, we’ve got to ask ourselves well who will design that IEP, who will be involved in that process, who will have access to that and be responsible for monitoring progress through it. Student voice is another thing that gets reflected here, how is that reflected in the day to day decisions that are made around school. An example I can think of there - BYOD projects that are looming large around schools. There’s a great deal of variance in terms of schools that decide to go down that track and dictate or determine precisely what sort of device it will be, precisely what sort of applications will be used and when and how, through to those that say well actually the intent is to allow individuals to use an individual device to achieve the same level of outputs so the agentic learner will make decisions about a device and the applications that are suitable to their needs. 

One of the things we have to think about is just day to day what’s happening in our classrooms and the extent to which they are teacher-centric versus learners being involved in making those choices and determining. Even things like the curriculum itself and involving learners a lot more in the choices about the what as well as the how and the why of what is being learned. And I guess another thing in terms of schools responsibility in helping learners develop agency in their learning is to consider the safeguards that we need to have in place in that process to make sure no one is falling through the gaps under the guise of just doing my own thing. 

So I think understanding the concept of learner agency is really one of the key differentiating factors in thinking about 21st century learning and teaching. It’s definitely quite a different approach to understand our learners exercising agency in their learning from what it was like when I was at school.

So agency, when someone has agency in their learning, they have the power to act. The key idea really is that learning requires the activity and the initiative of the learner, more than the inputs that are transmitted to the learner from the teacher, from the curriculum, the resources and so forth. In the past in our schools, our schools were designed to cater for groups, for classes of kids, with a one size fits all approach. And arguably, many students felt disenfranchised in the midst of that, as they just had to sit and do what they were told. Lessons were delivered to students and as a result they were just passive in the way that they received that. When learners move from being passive recipients then to being much more active in the learning process, actively involved in the decisions about the learning, then they have agency. So that’s really what agency and the understanding of that’s about. 

Yeah there’s been a lot of talk in the past about learner-centric approaches to education and personalisation, and these are aspects of what we might mean by learner agency, but it is a far deeper, more richer understanding that we have I think. Before a learner chooses to exercise the agency in their particular learning context for example they’ve got to have a personal sense of that agency, a belief that their behaviour and their approach to learning is actually going to make a difference for them in the learning in that setting. Another thing about it is that unlike many peoples perception of learner-centeredness which to them is often about handing everything over to the learner, sort of abdication model, the notion of agency isn’t simply about handing control over to the learner. It involves a far greater tapestry of intentionality if you like on the part of schools and teachers to create that context and environment where the learners are actively involved in the moment by moment learning and well being. It will probably help to think of it this way. 

There are three things that I think are core features of our understanding of learner agency. The first is that agency involves the initiative or self-regulation of the learner. I’ve talked about that. The second though is that agency is interdependent. That is it mediates and is mediated by the sociocultural context of the classroom. So it’s not just about a learner in isolation doing their own thing and what suits them. And the third thing really is that agency includes an awareness of the responsibility of ones own actions on the environment and on others. So there’s a social connectedness kind of dimension to that. You can’t just act selfishly and call that acting with agency. 

The implications of this in our schools are myriad really, and as we think about how our schools are going to be places that will prepare kids for life and work in the 21st century with the 21st century skills and knowledge and innovative approaches and all that sort of thing, we need to be encouraging them to be agentic in their learning, because that’s what they are going to need to be able to do beyond school of course. So in our schools, we need to be considering things that are going to be contributing to that. For instance, what use are we making of IEPs as a way of personalising the approach, not just in terms of the delivery, but in terms of the learners ownership of that learning and the direction for that learning. And as we are doing that, we’ve got to ask ourselves well who will design that IEP, who will be involved in that process, who will have access to that and be responsible for monitoring progress through it. Student voice is another thing that gets reflected here, how is that reflected in the day to day decisions that are made around school. An example I can think of there - BYOD projects that are looming large around schools. There’s a great deal of variance in terms of schools that decide to go down that track and dictate or determine precisely what sort of device it will be, precisely what sort of applications will be used and when and how, through to those that say well actually the intent is to allow individuals to use an individual device to achieve the same level of outputs so the agentic learner will make decisions about a device and the applications that are suitable to their needs. 

One of the things we have to think about is just day to day what’s happening in our classrooms and the extent to which they are teacher-centric versus learners being involved in making those choices and determining. Even things like the curriculum itself and involving learners a lot more in the choices about the what as well as the how and the why of what is being learned. And I guess another thing in terms of schools responsibility in helping learners develop agency in their learning is to consider the safeguards that we need to have in place in that process to make sure no one is falling through the gaps under the guise of just doing my own thing. 

So I think understanding the concept of learner agency is really one of the key differentiating factors in thinking about 21st century learning and teaching. It’s definitely quite a different approach to understand our learners exercising agency in their learning from what it was like when I was at school.

Date added: 13/02/2014

Ten Trends 2014: Agency

Derek Wenmoth provides an explanation of learner agency in the first of CORE Education's ten trends for 2014. Derek describes three features: the initiative or self-regulation of the learner, the way agency mediates and is mediated by the sociocultural context of the classroom, and social connectedness - an awareness of the responsibility of one's own actions on others. 

Views 18,778 Date added: 13/02/2014

Ten Trends 2014: Agency

So agency, when someone has agency in their learning, they have the power to act. The key idea really is that learning requires the activity and the initiative of the learner, more than the inputs that are transmitted to the learner from the teacher, from the curriculum, the resources and so forth. In the past in our schools, our schools were designed to cater for groups, for classes of kids, with a one size fits all approach. And arguably, many students felt disenfranchised in the midst of that, as they just had to sit and do what they were told. Lessons were delivered to students and as a result they were just passive in the way that they received that. When learners move from being passive recipients then to being much more active in the learning process, actively involved in the decisions about the learning, then they have agency. So that’s really what agency and the understanding of that’s about. 

Yeah there’s been a lot of talk in the past about learner-centric approaches to education and personalisation, and these are aspects of what we might mean by learner agency, but it is a far deeper, more richer understanding that we have I think. Before a learner chooses to exercise the agency in their particular learning context for example they’ve got to have a personal sense of that agency, a belief that their behaviour and their approach to learning is actually going to make a difference for them in the learning in that setting. Another thing about it is that unlike many peoples perception of learner-centeredness which to them is often about handing everything over to the learner, sort of abdication model, the notion of agency isn’t simply about handing control over to the learner. It involves a far greater tapestry of intentionality if you like on the part of schools and teachers to create that context and environment where the learners are actively involved in the moment by moment learning and well being. It will probably help to think of it this way. 

There are three things that I think are core features of our understanding of learner agency. The first is that agency involves the initiative or self-regulation of the learner. I’ve talked about that. The second though is that agency is interdependent. That is it mediates and is mediated by the sociocultural context of the classroom. So it’s not just about a learner in isolation doing their own thing and what suits them. And the third thing really is that agency includes an awareness of the responsibility of ones own actions on the environment and on others. So there’s a social connectedness kind of dimension to that. You can’t just act selfishly and call that acting with agency. 

The implications of this in our schools are myriad really, and as we think about how our schools are going to be places that will prepare kids for life and work in the 21st century with the 21st century skills and knowledge and innovative approaches and all that sort of thing, we need to be encouraging them to be agentic in their learning, because that’s what they are going to need to be able to do beyond school of course. So in our schools, we need to be considering things that are going to be contributing to that. For instance, what use are we making of IEPs as a way of personalising the approach, not just in terms of the delivery, but in terms of the learners ownership of that learning and the direction for that learning. And as we are doing that, we’ve got to ask ourselves well who will design that IEP, who will be involved in that process, who will have access to that and be responsible for monitoring progress through it. Student voice is another thing that gets reflected here, how is that reflected in the day to day decisions that are made around school. An example I can think of there - BYOD projects that are looming large around schools. There’s a great deal of variance in terms of schools that decide to go down that track and dictate or determine precisely what sort of device it will be, precisely what sort of applications will be used and when and how, through to those that say well actually the intent is to allow individuals to use an individual device to achieve the same level of outputs so the agentic learner will make decisions about a device and the applications that are suitable to their needs. 

One of the things we have to think about is just day to day what’s happening in our classrooms and the extent to which they are teacher-centric versus learners being involved in making those choices and determining. Even things like the curriculum itself and involving learners a lot more in the choices about the what as well as the how and the why of what is being learned. And I guess another thing in terms of schools responsibility in helping learners develop agency in their learning is to consider the safeguards that we need to have in place in that process to make sure no one is falling through the gaps under the guise of just doing my own thing. 

So I think understanding the concept of learner agency is really one of the key differentiating factors in thinking about 21st century learning and teaching. It’s definitely quite a different approach to understand our learners exercising agency in their learning from what it was like when I was at school.

So agency, when someone has agency in their learning, they have the power to act. The key idea really is that learning requires the activity and the initiative of the learner, more than the inputs that are transmitted to the learner from the teacher, from the curriculum, the resources and so forth. In the past in our schools, our schools were designed to cater for groups, for classes of kids, with a one size fits all approach. And arguably, many students felt disenfranchised in the midst of that, as they just had to sit and do what they were told. Lessons were delivered to students and as a result they were just passive in the way that they received that. When learners move from being passive recipients then to being much more active in the learning process, actively involved in the decisions about the learning, then they have agency. So that’s really what agency and the understanding of that’s about. 

Yeah there’s been a lot of talk in the past about learner-centric approaches to education and personalisation, and these are aspects of what we might mean by learner agency, but it is a far deeper, more richer understanding that we have I think. Before a learner chooses to exercise the agency in their particular learning context for example they’ve got to have a personal sense of that agency, a belief that their behaviour and their approach to learning is actually going to make a difference for them in the learning in that setting. Another thing about it is that unlike many peoples perception of learner-centeredness which to them is often about handing everything over to the learner, sort of abdication model, the notion of agency isn’t simply about handing control over to the learner. It involves a far greater tapestry of intentionality if you like on the part of schools and teachers to create that context and environment where the learners are actively involved in the moment by moment learning and well being. It will probably help to think of it this way. 

There are three things that I think are core features of our understanding of learner agency. The first is that agency involves the initiative or self-regulation of the learner. I’ve talked about that. The second though is that agency is interdependent. That is it mediates and is mediated by the sociocultural context of the classroom. So it’s not just about a learner in isolation doing their own thing and what suits them. And the third thing really is that agency includes an awareness of the responsibility of ones own actions on the environment and on others. So there’s a social connectedness kind of dimension to that. You can’t just act selfishly and call that acting with agency. 

The implications of this in our schools are myriad really, and as we think about how our schools are going to be places that will prepare kids for life and work in the 21st century with the 21st century skills and knowledge and innovative approaches and all that sort of thing, we need to be encouraging them to be agentic in their learning, because that’s what they are going to need to be able to do beyond school of course. So in our schools, we need to be considering things that are going to be contributing to that. For instance, what use are we making of IEPs as a way of personalising the approach, not just in terms of the delivery, but in terms of the learners ownership of that learning and the direction for that learning. And as we are doing that, we’ve got to ask ourselves well who will design that IEP, who will be involved in that process, who will have access to that and be responsible for monitoring progress through it. Student voice is another thing that gets reflected here, how is that reflected in the day to day decisions that are made around school. An example I can think of there - BYOD projects that are looming large around schools. There’s a great deal of variance in terms of schools that decide to go down that track and dictate or determine precisely what sort of device it will be, precisely what sort of applications will be used and when and how, through to those that say well actually the intent is to allow individuals to use an individual device to achieve the same level of outputs so the agentic learner will make decisions about a device and the applications that are suitable to their needs. 

One of the things we have to think about is just day to day what’s happening in our classrooms and the extent to which they are teacher-centric versus learners being involved in making those choices and determining. Even things like the curriculum itself and involving learners a lot more in the choices about the what as well as the how and the why of what is being learned. And I guess another thing in terms of schools responsibility in helping learners develop agency in their learning is to consider the safeguards that we need to have in place in that process to make sure no one is falling through the gaps under the guise of just doing my own thing. 

So I think understanding the concept of learner agency is really one of the key differentiating factors in thinking about 21st century learning and teaching. It’s definitely quite a different approach to understand our learners exercising agency in their learning from what it was like when I was at school.

Date added: 13/02/2014

The 2014 Ten Trends explained

Learner agency

The Bundlr collection of curated links for learner agency

The EDtalks Ten Trends channel
 

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