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The CORE Education eFellowship Awards recognise innovative e-learning practice by New Zealand teachers.

View more stories from CORE Education eFellows in the eFellows EDtalks channel

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

The CORE Education eFellowship Awards recognise innovative e-learning practice by New Zealand teachers.

View more stories from CORE Education eFellows in the eFellows EDtalks channel

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

Speaker: Paula Eskett

Paula Eskett is the school library manager at Riccarton High School in Christchurch. Paula is a 2012 CORE Education eFellow and has spent the year investigating increasing student engagement in research and learning through the use of mobile devices. 

Views 20,004
Date added: 28 Nov 2012
Duration: 3:16

Hi I'm Paula Eskett, I'm the school library manager at Riccarton High School in Christchurch. 

A few years ago I started attending CORE functions, some breakfasts and then Ulearn and I was just blown away with what was going out there in the real world, education world. Having a library background constantly frustrated how teachers, schools, students perceive school libraries. And really challenged by what I was seeing happening with CORE and the innovation that was going on. So sort of set out to try and blow the stereotype of what school libraries are about and school librarians and when I was accepted to be an eFellow that was sort of my little mission as well.

My research, my investigation this year has been creating engagement through play using mobile devices. Based around our experiences last year during the earthquake when we lost most of our collection because our library was occupied by the council. So we had to resort to something which I introduced 'is there an app for that?" to our service delivery promise to our school. So in addition to books of which there were only a few, Google searching, Google bashing and databases, we had a fourth level of service called "Is there an app for that?"

So we created engagement with the students because instantly they thought that was pretty cool. Getting buy in from the teachers was a lot more different as phones were seen as a hinderance, a distraction. So we found a few ways to try and make them valuable classroom tools while adding apps that added value.

The big epiphany came during a year ten science class doing astronomy and we found amazing apps that could link the kids, supported learning year ten kids with the research with the books. And it has just been amazing. The level of engagement with the kids, sitting down with them, with my iphone, with the library iPad, and just checking out apps together, finding out what is good. 

Not always educational, but with secondary I think it is important to build a relationship with the kids first. So they know you, you know them and then when they need you the ice is broken.

This sort of work takes time. You have to build the relationships with the kids, you've got to build the relationships with the teachers. You got to have the trust from the teachers to let them have the phones, tell a class when they're in the library get your phone out. So there's building the trust with the teachers first so that takes a wee while. And with the kids not always focusing on the educational aspect just playing for the sake of playing and then seeing us doing that. And giving them the time, sitting down on the couch in the library, "So what's a cool app for my ten year old? What's the best game you've got? Have you seen the free apps on the app store today?" Just spending some time building the relationship and then trying the educational stuff. 

Hi I'm Paula Eskett, I'm the school library manager at Riccarton High School in Christchurch. 

A few years ago I started attending CORE functions, some breakfasts and then Ulearn and I was just blown away with what was going out there in the real world, education world. Having a library background constantly frustrated how teachers, schools, students perceive school libraries. And really challenged by what I was seeing happening with CORE and the innovation that was going on. So sort of set out to try and blow the stereotype of what school libraries are about and school librarians and when I was accepted to be an eFellow that was sort of my little mission as well.

My research, my investigation this year has been creating engagement through play using mobile devices. Based around our experiences last year during the earthquake when we lost most of our collection because our library was occupied by the council. So we had to resort to something which I introduced 'is there an app for that?" to our service delivery promise to our school. So in addition to books of which there were only a few, Google searching, Google bashing and databases, we had a fourth level of service called "Is there an app for that?"

So we created engagement with the students because instantly they thought that was pretty cool. Getting buy in from the teachers was a lot more different as phones were seen as a hinderance, a distraction. So we found a few ways to try and make them valuable classroom tools while adding apps that added value.

The big epiphany came during a year ten science class doing astronomy and we found amazing apps that could link the kids, supported learning year ten kids with the research with the books. And it has just been amazing. The level of engagement with the kids, sitting down with them, with my iphone, with the library iPad, and just checking out apps together, finding out what is good. 

Not always educational, but with secondary I think it is important to build a relationship with the kids first. So they know you, you know them and then when they need you the ice is broken.

This sort of work takes time. You have to build the relationships with the kids, you've got to build the relationships with the teachers. You got to have the trust from the teachers to let them have the phones, tell a class when they're in the library get your phone out. So there's building the trust with the teachers first so that takes a wee while. And with the kids not always focusing on the educational aspect just playing for the sake of playing and then seeing us doing that. And giving them the time, sitting down on the couch in the library, "So what's a cool app for my ten year old? What's the best game you've got? Have you seen the free apps on the app store today?" Just spending some time building the relationship and then trying the educational stuff. 

Date added: 11/28/2012
Is there an app for that?
Date added: 11/28/2012

Is there an app for that?

Paula Eskett is the school library manager at Riccarton High School in Christchurch. Paula is a 2012 CORE Education eFellow and has spent the year investigating increasing student engagement in research and learning through the use of mobile devices. 

Views 20,004 Date added: 28/11/2012

Is there an app for that?

Hi I'm Paula Eskett, I'm the school library manager at Riccarton High School in Christchurch. 

A few years ago I started attending CORE functions, some breakfasts and then Ulearn and I was just blown away with what was going out there in the real world, education world. Having a library background constantly frustrated how teachers, schools, students perceive school libraries. And really challenged by what I was seeing happening with CORE and the innovation that was going on. So sort of set out to try and blow the stereotype of what school libraries are about and school librarians and when I was accepted to be an eFellow that was sort of my little mission as well.

My research, my investigation this year has been creating engagement through play using mobile devices. Based around our experiences last year during the earthquake when we lost most of our collection because our library was occupied by the council. So we had to resort to something which I introduced 'is there an app for that?" to our service delivery promise to our school. So in addition to books of which there were only a few, Google searching, Google bashing and databases, we had a fourth level of service called "Is there an app for that?"

So we created engagement with the students because instantly they thought that was pretty cool. Getting buy in from the teachers was a lot more different as phones were seen as a hinderance, a distraction. So we found a few ways to try and make them valuable classroom tools while adding apps that added value.

The big epiphany came during a year ten science class doing astronomy and we found amazing apps that could link the kids, supported learning year ten kids with the research with the books. And it has just been amazing. The level of engagement with the kids, sitting down with them, with my iphone, with the library iPad, and just checking out apps together, finding out what is good. 

Not always educational, but with secondary I think it is important to build a relationship with the kids first. So they know you, you know them and then when they need you the ice is broken.

This sort of work takes time. You have to build the relationships with the kids, you've got to build the relationships with the teachers. You got to have the trust from the teachers to let them have the phones, tell a class when they're in the library get your phone out. So there's building the trust with the teachers first so that takes a wee while. And with the kids not always focusing on the educational aspect just playing for the sake of playing and then seeing us doing that. And giving them the time, sitting down on the couch in the library, "So what's a cool app for my ten year old? What's the best game you've got? Have you seen the free apps on the app store today?" Just spending some time building the relationship and then trying the educational stuff. 

Hi I'm Paula Eskett, I'm the school library manager at Riccarton High School in Christchurch. 

A few years ago I started attending CORE functions, some breakfasts and then Ulearn and I was just blown away with what was going out there in the real world, education world. Having a library background constantly frustrated how teachers, schools, students perceive school libraries. And really challenged by what I was seeing happening with CORE and the innovation that was going on. So sort of set out to try and blow the stereotype of what school libraries are about and school librarians and when I was accepted to be an eFellow that was sort of my little mission as well.

My research, my investigation this year has been creating engagement through play using mobile devices. Based around our experiences last year during the earthquake when we lost most of our collection because our library was occupied by the council. So we had to resort to something which I introduced 'is there an app for that?" to our service delivery promise to our school. So in addition to books of which there were only a few, Google searching, Google bashing and databases, we had a fourth level of service called "Is there an app for that?"

So we created engagement with the students because instantly they thought that was pretty cool. Getting buy in from the teachers was a lot more different as phones were seen as a hinderance, a distraction. So we found a few ways to try and make them valuable classroom tools while adding apps that added value.

The big epiphany came during a year ten science class doing astronomy and we found amazing apps that could link the kids, supported learning year ten kids with the research with the books. And it has just been amazing. The level of engagement with the kids, sitting down with them, with my iphone, with the library iPad, and just checking out apps together, finding out what is good. 

Not always educational, but with secondary I think it is important to build a relationship with the kids first. So they know you, you know them and then when they need you the ice is broken.

This sort of work takes time. You have to build the relationships with the kids, you've got to build the relationships with the teachers. You got to have the trust from the teachers to let them have the phones, tell a class when they're in the library get your phone out. So there's building the trust with the teachers first so that takes a wee while. And with the kids not always focusing on the educational aspect just playing for the sake of playing and then seeing us doing that. And giving them the time, sitting down on the couch in the library, "So what's a cool app for my ten year old? What's the best game you've got? Have you seen the free apps on the app store today?" Just spending some time building the relationship and then trying the educational stuff. 

Date added: 28/11/2012

Is there an app for that?

Paula Eskett is the school library manager at Riccarton High School in Christchurch. Paula is a 2012 CORE Education eFellow and has spent the year investigating increasing student engagement in research and learning through the use of mobile devices. 

Views 20,004 Date added: 28/11/2012

Is there an app for that?

Hi I'm Paula Eskett, I'm the school library manager at Riccarton High School in Christchurch. 

A few years ago I started attending CORE functions, some breakfasts and then Ulearn and I was just blown away with what was going out there in the real world, education world. Having a library background constantly frustrated how teachers, schools, students perceive school libraries. And really challenged by what I was seeing happening with CORE and the innovation that was going on. So sort of set out to try and blow the stereotype of what school libraries are about and school librarians and when I was accepted to be an eFellow that was sort of my little mission as well.

My research, my investigation this year has been creating engagement through play using mobile devices. Based around our experiences last year during the earthquake when we lost most of our collection because our library was occupied by the council. So we had to resort to something which I introduced 'is there an app for that?" to our service delivery promise to our school. So in addition to books of which there were only a few, Google searching, Google bashing and databases, we had a fourth level of service called "Is there an app for that?"

So we created engagement with the students because instantly they thought that was pretty cool. Getting buy in from the teachers was a lot more different as phones were seen as a hinderance, a distraction. So we found a few ways to try and make them valuable classroom tools while adding apps that added value.

The big epiphany came during a year ten science class doing astronomy and we found amazing apps that could link the kids, supported learning year ten kids with the research with the books. And it has just been amazing. The level of engagement with the kids, sitting down with them, with my iphone, with the library iPad, and just checking out apps together, finding out what is good. 

Not always educational, but with secondary I think it is important to build a relationship with the kids first. So they know you, you know them and then when they need you the ice is broken.

This sort of work takes time. You have to build the relationships with the kids, you've got to build the relationships with the teachers. You got to have the trust from the teachers to let them have the phones, tell a class when they're in the library get your phone out. So there's building the trust with the teachers first so that takes a wee while. And with the kids not always focusing on the educational aspect just playing for the sake of playing and then seeing us doing that. And giving them the time, sitting down on the couch in the library, "So what's a cool app for my ten year old? What's the best game you've got? Have you seen the free apps on the app store today?" Just spending some time building the relationship and then trying the educational stuff. 

Hi I'm Paula Eskett, I'm the school library manager at Riccarton High School in Christchurch. 

A few years ago I started attending CORE functions, some breakfasts and then Ulearn and I was just blown away with what was going out there in the real world, education world. Having a library background constantly frustrated how teachers, schools, students perceive school libraries. And really challenged by what I was seeing happening with CORE and the innovation that was going on. So sort of set out to try and blow the stereotype of what school libraries are about and school librarians and when I was accepted to be an eFellow that was sort of my little mission as well.

My research, my investigation this year has been creating engagement through play using mobile devices. Based around our experiences last year during the earthquake when we lost most of our collection because our library was occupied by the council. So we had to resort to something which I introduced 'is there an app for that?" to our service delivery promise to our school. So in addition to books of which there were only a few, Google searching, Google bashing and databases, we had a fourth level of service called "Is there an app for that?"

So we created engagement with the students because instantly they thought that was pretty cool. Getting buy in from the teachers was a lot more different as phones were seen as a hinderance, a distraction. So we found a few ways to try and make them valuable classroom tools while adding apps that added value.

The big epiphany came during a year ten science class doing astronomy and we found amazing apps that could link the kids, supported learning year ten kids with the research with the books. And it has just been amazing. The level of engagement with the kids, sitting down with them, with my iphone, with the library iPad, and just checking out apps together, finding out what is good. 

Not always educational, but with secondary I think it is important to build a relationship with the kids first. So they know you, you know them and then when they need you the ice is broken.

This sort of work takes time. You have to build the relationships with the kids, you've got to build the relationships with the teachers. You got to have the trust from the teachers to let them have the phones, tell a class when they're in the library get your phone out. So there's building the trust with the teachers first so that takes a wee while. And with the kids not always focusing on the educational aspect just playing for the sake of playing and then seeing us doing that. And giving them the time, sitting down on the couch in the library, "So what's a cool app for my ten year old? What's the best game you've got? Have you seen the free apps on the app store today?" Just spending some time building the relationship and then trying the educational stuff. 

Date added: 28/11/2012

The CORE Education eFellowship Awards recognise innovative e-learning practice by New Zealand teachers.

View more stories from CORE Education eFellows in the eFellows EDtalks channel

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

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