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CORE Education's Chrissie Butler is available to consult on Universal Design for Learning.

 

Chrissie was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

CORE Education's Chrissie Butler is available to consult on Universal Design for Learning.

 

Chrissie was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

Speaker: Chrissie Butler

CORE Education's Chrissie Butler explains universal design for learning. She challenges us to think of ways that we can design learning for the diverse students in our classrooms: different ways to present learning and different ways for students to demonstrate their learning.

Views 30,363
Date added: 19 Dec 2012
Duration: 3:28

Kia ora, I'm Chrissie Butler and I work with the team at CORE Educaton.One of the things I've been looking at recently is this thing called universal design for learning and it is a framework for looking at the way we design curriculum. The thing that is kind of different about it is often even when we're using technology, even when we have a classroom full of iPads, we can still fall into the one size fits all. Okay so we're going to use that drawing app and that's the option that we present for students. And it may be really engaging for a lot of kids but there are still kids, because we know that everybody is different, and that we all learn in different ways, that's still actually that traditional model but with a different cover.So Universal design for learning is a framework that is based on three principles that acknowledges that variability from the outset. One principle is about how we perceive information and so the response as an educator is okay, I can't just present text. If I acknowledge that people are different, and that's always the case, I need to present text and image and video and audio, opportunities to move, because learners are going to perceive information in a different way. The same with how we express what we know, what works for one student isn't going to work for another.But still even with the technology we fall into this trap, we fix on one app, and we present it to a group of kids and they're really fired up and love, get really into using it. But it's like in terms of supporting students to demonstrate what they know we've actually just really narrowed the parameters.The other thing about engagement is that whole thing about what engages one learner doesn't necessarily engage another. And I know for myself I often kind of think that the default is me, the way I learn, and I start by what is going to motivate me. Whereas actually the default isn't me. There is no default. The default is that there is incredible variability and we actually need to start from there and create learning opportunities with lots of options for how we present, action expression, how we are going to engage learners. Otherwise actually all we're doing is presenting again that traditionally designed curriculum for that average illusory learner.

Kia ora, I'm Chrissie Butler and I work with the team at CORE Educaton.One of the things I've been looking at recently is this thing called universal design for learning and it is a framework for looking at the way we design curriculum. The thing that is kind of different about it is often even when we're using technology, even when we have a classroom full of iPads, we can still fall into the one size fits all. Okay so we're going to use that drawing app and that's the option that we present for students. And it may be really engaging for a lot of kids but there are still kids, because we know that everybody is different, and that we all learn in different ways, that's still actually that traditional model but with a different cover.So Universal design for learning is a framework that is based on three principles that acknowledges that variability from the outset. One principle is about how we perceive information and so the response as an educator is okay, I can't just present text. If I acknowledge that people are different, and that's always the case, I need to present text and image and video and audio, opportunities to move, because learners are going to perceive information in a different way. The same with how we express what we know, what works for one student isn't going to work for another.But still even with the technology we fall into this trap, we fix on one app, and we present it to a group of kids and they're really fired up and love, get really into using it. But it's like in terms of supporting students to demonstrate what they know we've actually just really narrowed the parameters.The other thing about engagement is that whole thing about what engages one learner doesn't necessarily engage another. And I know for myself I often kind of think that the default is me, the way I learn, and I start by what is going to motivate me. Whereas actually the default isn't me. There is no default. The default is that there is incredible variability and we actually need to start from there and create learning opportunities with lots of options for how we present, action expression, how we are going to engage learners. Otherwise actually all we're doing is presenting again that traditionally designed curriculum for that average illusory learner.

Date added: 12/19/2012
Universal design for learning
Date added: 12/19/2012

Universal design for learning

CORE Education's Chrissie Butler explains universal design for learning. She challenges us to think of ways that we can design learning for the diverse students in our classrooms: different ways to present learning and different ways for students to demonstrate their learning.

Views 30,363 Date added: 19/12/2012

Universal design for learning

Kia ora, I'm Chrissie Butler and I work with the team at CORE Educaton.One of the things I've been looking at recently is this thing called universal design for learning and it is a framework for looking at the way we design curriculum. The thing that is kind of different about it is often even when we're using technology, even when we have a classroom full of iPads, we can still fall into the one size fits all. Okay so we're going to use that drawing app and that's the option that we present for students. And it may be really engaging for a lot of kids but there are still kids, because we know that everybody is different, and that we all learn in different ways, that's still actually that traditional model but with a different cover.So Universal design for learning is a framework that is based on three principles that acknowledges that variability from the outset. One principle is about how we perceive information and so the response as an educator is okay, I can't just present text. If I acknowledge that people are different, and that's always the case, I need to present text and image and video and audio, opportunities to move, because learners are going to perceive information in a different way. The same with how we express what we know, what works for one student isn't going to work for another.But still even with the technology we fall into this trap, we fix on one app, and we present it to a group of kids and they're really fired up and love, get really into using it. But it's like in terms of supporting students to demonstrate what they know we've actually just really narrowed the parameters.The other thing about engagement is that whole thing about what engages one learner doesn't necessarily engage another. And I know for myself I often kind of think that the default is me, the way I learn, and I start by what is going to motivate me. Whereas actually the default isn't me. There is no default. The default is that there is incredible variability and we actually need to start from there and create learning opportunities with lots of options for how we present, action expression, how we are going to engage learners. Otherwise actually all we're doing is presenting again that traditionally designed curriculum for that average illusory learner.

Kia ora, I'm Chrissie Butler and I work with the team at CORE Educaton.One of the things I've been looking at recently is this thing called universal design for learning and it is a framework for looking at the way we design curriculum. The thing that is kind of different about it is often even when we're using technology, even when we have a classroom full of iPads, we can still fall into the one size fits all. Okay so we're going to use that drawing app and that's the option that we present for students. And it may be really engaging for a lot of kids but there are still kids, because we know that everybody is different, and that we all learn in different ways, that's still actually that traditional model but with a different cover.So Universal design for learning is a framework that is based on three principles that acknowledges that variability from the outset. One principle is about how we perceive information and so the response as an educator is okay, I can't just present text. If I acknowledge that people are different, and that's always the case, I need to present text and image and video and audio, opportunities to move, because learners are going to perceive information in a different way. The same with how we express what we know, what works for one student isn't going to work for another.But still even with the technology we fall into this trap, we fix on one app, and we present it to a group of kids and they're really fired up and love, get really into using it. But it's like in terms of supporting students to demonstrate what they know we've actually just really narrowed the parameters.The other thing about engagement is that whole thing about what engages one learner doesn't necessarily engage another. And I know for myself I often kind of think that the default is me, the way I learn, and I start by what is going to motivate me. Whereas actually the default isn't me. There is no default. The default is that there is incredible variability and we actually need to start from there and create learning opportunities with lots of options for how we present, action expression, how we are going to engage learners. Otherwise actually all we're doing is presenting again that traditionally designed curriculum for that average illusory learner.

Date added: 19/12/2012

Universal design for learning

CORE Education's Chrissie Butler explains universal design for learning. She challenges us to think of ways that we can design learning for the diverse students in our classrooms: different ways to present learning and different ways for students to demonstrate their learning.

Views 30,363 Date added: 19/12/2012

Universal design for learning

Kia ora, I'm Chrissie Butler and I work with the team at CORE Educaton.One of the things I've been looking at recently is this thing called universal design for learning and it is a framework for looking at the way we design curriculum. The thing that is kind of different about it is often even when we're using technology, even when we have a classroom full of iPads, we can still fall into the one size fits all. Okay so we're going to use that drawing app and that's the option that we present for students. And it may be really engaging for a lot of kids but there are still kids, because we know that everybody is different, and that we all learn in different ways, that's still actually that traditional model but with a different cover.So Universal design for learning is a framework that is based on three principles that acknowledges that variability from the outset. One principle is about how we perceive information and so the response as an educator is okay, I can't just present text. If I acknowledge that people are different, and that's always the case, I need to present text and image and video and audio, opportunities to move, because learners are going to perceive information in a different way. The same with how we express what we know, what works for one student isn't going to work for another.But still even with the technology we fall into this trap, we fix on one app, and we present it to a group of kids and they're really fired up and love, get really into using it. But it's like in terms of supporting students to demonstrate what they know we've actually just really narrowed the parameters.The other thing about engagement is that whole thing about what engages one learner doesn't necessarily engage another. And I know for myself I often kind of think that the default is me, the way I learn, and I start by what is going to motivate me. Whereas actually the default isn't me. There is no default. The default is that there is incredible variability and we actually need to start from there and create learning opportunities with lots of options for how we present, action expression, how we are going to engage learners. Otherwise actually all we're doing is presenting again that traditionally designed curriculum for that average illusory learner.

Kia ora, I'm Chrissie Butler and I work with the team at CORE Educaton.One of the things I've been looking at recently is this thing called universal design for learning and it is a framework for looking at the way we design curriculum. The thing that is kind of different about it is often even when we're using technology, even when we have a classroom full of iPads, we can still fall into the one size fits all. Okay so we're going to use that drawing app and that's the option that we present for students. And it may be really engaging for a lot of kids but there are still kids, because we know that everybody is different, and that we all learn in different ways, that's still actually that traditional model but with a different cover.So Universal design for learning is a framework that is based on three principles that acknowledges that variability from the outset. One principle is about how we perceive information and so the response as an educator is okay, I can't just present text. If I acknowledge that people are different, and that's always the case, I need to present text and image and video and audio, opportunities to move, because learners are going to perceive information in a different way. The same with how we express what we know, what works for one student isn't going to work for another.But still even with the technology we fall into this trap, we fix on one app, and we present it to a group of kids and they're really fired up and love, get really into using it. But it's like in terms of supporting students to demonstrate what they know we've actually just really narrowed the parameters.The other thing about engagement is that whole thing about what engages one learner doesn't necessarily engage another. And I know for myself I often kind of think that the default is me, the way I learn, and I start by what is going to motivate me. Whereas actually the default isn't me. There is no default. The default is that there is incredible variability and we actually need to start from there and create learning opportunities with lots of options for how we present, action expression, how we are going to engage learners. Otherwise actually all we're doing is presenting again that traditionally designed curriculum for that average illusory learner.

Date added: 19/12/2012

CORE Education's Chrissie Butler is available to consult on Universal Design for Learning.

 

Chrissie was speaking at ULearn12 - find out about other upcoming CORE conferences >>

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

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