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Speaker: Emani Fakaotimanava-lui

Emani Fakaotimanava-lui is director of Internet Niue's service provider RockET Systems Ltd, and Marketing Manager of Hei Niue. Emani describes the loss of Vagahau Niue, the Niuean language, and outlines a number of ways that technology is being used to preserve and share the language, including the use of social media and the involvement of students in Niue.

Views 21,452
Date added: 26 Jul 2013
Duration:

My name is Emani Fakaotimanava-lui and I’m from Niue, here with my wife TaniRose as well. I was at the NetHui last year in Auckland and basically I’m involved with the Pacific Islands chapter of the Internet Society and we look after 22 countries in the Pacific and a lot of our countries are moving across to New Zealand from the Pacific, and because of that the loss of language is a reality. 

So in my country of 1,300 there is 20,000 living outside of Niue. Most of them are in Auckland and, based on UNESCO reporting, our language is basically extinct. So this is because a lot of the children are beginning to learn to speak their first language in English instead of Niuean so part of the work that I also do is using the Internet and the ICT as a catalyst to help preserve Vagahau Niue which is the Niuean language. It is good to see that the Government is also working towards like a language week within the New Zealand environment for each country like Samoa, Tonga, Niue and Maori language week which is just happening at the time, so these are the kind of things that we are looking at and also to help us with growing the content of our language, not just in our own country but in the Internet environment.

So we’re trying to also capture those that are living outside of the country that have taken the traditional knowledge of the language, and not just the language but also extends to culture and heritage. The way I saw it when I first went to an Internet governance forum that was held in Nairobi but I went to that to receive an award that was given by ISIF as part of the APNIC programme. We received that for the work that we do in Niue for distribution of wireless, putting out Internet to the population on Niue. So, when I arrived there I learned from UNESCO, one of the UNESCO people there, saying things about the language and distribution and lack of content, so I took home some of the ideas from there and I built on that and some of the things that we’re using right now is social media, Twitter, and especially Facebook as well, and reaching across to the dispersed population of Niue.

So we wouldn’t have been able to do this in an old method of trying to call meetings and trying to talk to the people, so we are instantaneously reaching across to the young people especially, the old as well, and not just that but in between who have language. So we try to take the normal English terms and also the phases and just translate those and put them out in social media and saying this is the translation that you could look at, and we are getting a lot of feedback especially from the young people who are born in New Zealand and do not know the language but have some understanding of it, and so we’re trying to create this confidence around it and bringing out this package and saying well if you don’t really understand how to say it, this is how you actually can Tweet using your own language that others will be able to understand.

So it’s slowly trying to build that and that’s to do with the Internet but in terms of ICT we are also looking at trying to incorporate our language in things like spell checkers, thesaurus, dictionaries, online and in packages like Microsoft and Open Source, Open Office Library, so those are some of the things that we’re looking at doing and also in the future maybe capturing things like the legends in Niuean but using them in cartoons or gaming situations. So we have only two main schools which is the high school and the primary school and also early childhood. And one of the things, the initial ideas, was to give some of the work that we do in trying to translate some of the English terms and also the ICT terminologies into the schools that they will be able to help and assist with translating them, not just to translate in the initial stage but to get the children to come forward because they are the ones who understand the technology probably better than the gatekeepers of our language.

But in the long term we would probably wish for the children to have access to applications and software in the Niuean language, so things like in the primary school they tried to do this project called "one laptop per child" before and it didn’t really succeed because there wasn’t any planning that was put into it of how to incorporate it into the curriculum. But if we had all of the software translated into the language, into our Niuean language, and then use that as a tool into the primary schools, because Niuean is the first language that is taught in the schools until a certain age then you mix it with the English language. So if you have this kind of one laptop per child tool using applications that are in the Niuean language then it makes it easier for the teachers to use them and work with the children. So it’s that kind of thing that we want to translate a lot of the packages into Niuean and then work with some institutions into putting the application into the curriculum to be able to promote the language and I can see that possibly this may be our last stand, using ICT and Internet as a way of preserving the language.

I mean gone are the days where we just used language competitions, speeches, if you look at it, only some of the best and articulate students in the language will be able to stand up and confidently speak in our mother tongue, but using gaming, online applications, it actually has a far wider reach and can have a positive effect on reversing the cycle.

My name is Emani Fakaotimanava-lui and I’m from Niue, here with my wife TaniRose as well. I was at the NetHui last year in Auckland and basically I’m involved with the Pacific Islands chapter of the Internet Society and we look after 22 countries in the Pacific and a lot of our countries are moving across to New Zealand from the Pacific, and because of that the loss of language is a reality. 

So in my country of 1,300 there is 20,000 living outside of Niue. Most of them are in Auckland and, based on UNESCO reporting, our language is basically extinct. So this is because a lot of the children are beginning to learn to speak their first language in English instead of Niuean so part of the work that I also do is using the Internet and the ICT as a catalyst to help preserve Vagahau Niue which is the Niuean language. It is good to see that the Government is also working towards like a language week within the New Zealand environment for each country like Samoa, Tonga, Niue and Maori language week which is just happening at the time, so these are the kind of things that we are looking at and also to help us with growing the content of our language, not just in our own country but in the Internet environment.

So we’re trying to also capture those that are living outside of the country that have taken the traditional knowledge of the language, and not just the language but also extends to culture and heritage. The way I saw it when I first went to an Internet governance forum that was held in Nairobi but I went to that to receive an award that was given by ISIF as part of the APNIC programme. We received that for the work that we do in Niue for distribution of wireless, putting out Internet to the population on Niue. So, when I arrived there I learned from UNESCO, one of the UNESCO people there, saying things about the language and distribution and lack of content, so I took home some of the ideas from there and I built on that and some of the things that we’re using right now is social media, Twitter, and especially Facebook as well, and reaching across to the dispersed population of Niue.

So we wouldn’t have been able to do this in an old method of trying to call meetings and trying to talk to the people, so we are instantaneously reaching across to the young people especially, the old as well, and not just that but in between who have language. So we try to take the normal English terms and also the phases and just translate those and put them out in social media and saying this is the translation that you could look at, and we are getting a lot of feedback especially from the young people who are born in New Zealand and do not know the language but have some understanding of it, and so we’re trying to create this confidence around it and bringing out this package and saying well if you don’t really understand how to say it, this is how you actually can Tweet using your own language that others will be able to understand.

So it’s slowly trying to build that and that’s to do with the Internet but in terms of ICT we are also looking at trying to incorporate our language in things like spell checkers, thesaurus, dictionaries, online and in packages like Microsoft and Open Source, Open Office Library, so those are some of the things that we’re looking at doing and also in the future maybe capturing things like the legends in Niuean but using them in cartoons or gaming situations. So we have only two main schools which is the high school and the primary school and also early childhood. And one of the things, the initial ideas, was to give some of the work that we do in trying to translate some of the English terms and also the ICT terminologies into the schools that they will be able to help and assist with translating them, not just to translate in the initial stage but to get the children to come forward because they are the ones who understand the technology probably better than the gatekeepers of our language.

But in the long term we would probably wish for the children to have access to applications and software in the Niuean language, so things like in the primary school they tried to do this project called "one laptop per child" before and it didn’t really succeed because there wasn’t any planning that was put into it of how to incorporate it into the curriculum. But if we had all of the software translated into the language, into our Niuean language, and then use that as a tool into the primary schools, because Niuean is the first language that is taught in the schools until a certain age then you mix it with the English language. So if you have this kind of one laptop per child tool using applications that are in the Niuean language then it makes it easier for the teachers to use them and work with the children. So it’s that kind of thing that we want to translate a lot of the packages into Niuean and then work with some institutions into putting the application into the curriculum to be able to promote the language and I can see that possibly this may be our last stand, using ICT and Internet as a way of preserving the language.

I mean gone are the days where we just used language competitions, speeches, if you look at it, only some of the best and articulate students in the language will be able to stand up and confidently speak in our mother tongue, but using gaming, online applications, it actually has a far wider reach and can have a positive effect on reversing the cycle.

Date added: 07/26/2013

Using technology to preserve the Niuean language

Emani Fakaotimanava-lui is director of Internet Niue's service provider RockET Systems Ltd, and Marketing Manager of Hei Niue. Emani describes the loss of Vagahau Niue, the Niuean language, and outlines a number of ways that technology is being used to preserve and share the language, including the use of social media and the involvement of students in Niue.

Views 21,452 Date added: 26/07/2013

Using technology to preserve the Niuean language

My name is Emani Fakaotimanava-lui and I’m from Niue, here with my wife TaniRose as well. I was at the NetHui last year in Auckland and basically I’m involved with the Pacific Islands chapter of the Internet Society and we look after 22 countries in the Pacific and a lot of our countries are moving across to New Zealand from the Pacific, and because of that the loss of language is a reality. 

So in my country of 1,300 there is 20,000 living outside of Niue. Most of them are in Auckland and, based on UNESCO reporting, our language is basically extinct. So this is because a lot of the children are beginning to learn to speak their first language in English instead of Niuean so part of the work that I also do is using the Internet and the ICT as a catalyst to help preserve Vagahau Niue which is the Niuean language. It is good to see that the Government is also working towards like a language week within the New Zealand environment for each country like Samoa, Tonga, Niue and Maori language week which is just happening at the time, so these are the kind of things that we are looking at and also to help us with growing the content of our language, not just in our own country but in the Internet environment.

So we’re trying to also capture those that are living outside of the country that have taken the traditional knowledge of the language, and not just the language but also extends to culture and heritage. The way I saw it when I first went to an Internet governance forum that was held in Nairobi but I went to that to receive an award that was given by ISIF as part of the APNIC programme. We received that for the work that we do in Niue for distribution of wireless, putting out Internet to the population on Niue. So, when I arrived there I learned from UNESCO, one of the UNESCO people there, saying things about the language and distribution and lack of content, so I took home some of the ideas from there and I built on that and some of the things that we’re using right now is social media, Twitter, and especially Facebook as well, and reaching across to the dispersed population of Niue.

So we wouldn’t have been able to do this in an old method of trying to call meetings and trying to talk to the people, so we are instantaneously reaching across to the young people especially, the old as well, and not just that but in between who have language. So we try to take the normal English terms and also the phases and just translate those and put them out in social media and saying this is the translation that you could look at, and we are getting a lot of feedback especially from the young people who are born in New Zealand and do not know the language but have some understanding of it, and so we’re trying to create this confidence around it and bringing out this package and saying well if you don’t really understand how to say it, this is how you actually can Tweet using your own language that others will be able to understand.

So it’s slowly trying to build that and that’s to do with the Internet but in terms of ICT we are also looking at trying to incorporate our language in things like spell checkers, thesaurus, dictionaries, online and in packages like Microsoft and Open Source, Open Office Library, so those are some of the things that we’re looking at doing and also in the future maybe capturing things like the legends in Niuean but using them in cartoons or gaming situations. So we have only two main schools which is the high school and the primary school and also early childhood. And one of the things, the initial ideas, was to give some of the work that we do in trying to translate some of the English terms and also the ICT terminologies into the schools that they will be able to help and assist with translating them, not just to translate in the initial stage but to get the children to come forward because they are the ones who understand the technology probably better than the gatekeepers of our language.

But in the long term we would probably wish for the children to have access to applications and software in the Niuean language, so things like in the primary school they tried to do this project called "one laptop per child" before and it didn’t really succeed because there wasn’t any planning that was put into it of how to incorporate it into the curriculum. But if we had all of the software translated into the language, into our Niuean language, and then use that as a tool into the primary schools, because Niuean is the first language that is taught in the schools until a certain age then you mix it with the English language. So if you have this kind of one laptop per child tool using applications that are in the Niuean language then it makes it easier for the teachers to use them and work with the children. So it’s that kind of thing that we want to translate a lot of the packages into Niuean and then work with some institutions into putting the application into the curriculum to be able to promote the language and I can see that possibly this may be our last stand, using ICT and Internet as a way of preserving the language.

I mean gone are the days where we just used language competitions, speeches, if you look at it, only some of the best and articulate students in the language will be able to stand up and confidently speak in our mother tongue, but using gaming, online applications, it actually has a far wider reach and can have a positive effect on reversing the cycle.

My name is Emani Fakaotimanava-lui and I’m from Niue, here with my wife TaniRose as well. I was at the NetHui last year in Auckland and basically I’m involved with the Pacific Islands chapter of the Internet Society and we look after 22 countries in the Pacific and a lot of our countries are moving across to New Zealand from the Pacific, and because of that the loss of language is a reality. 

So in my country of 1,300 there is 20,000 living outside of Niue. Most of them are in Auckland and, based on UNESCO reporting, our language is basically extinct. So this is because a lot of the children are beginning to learn to speak their first language in English instead of Niuean so part of the work that I also do is using the Internet and the ICT as a catalyst to help preserve Vagahau Niue which is the Niuean language. It is good to see that the Government is also working towards like a language week within the New Zealand environment for each country like Samoa, Tonga, Niue and Maori language week which is just happening at the time, so these are the kind of things that we are looking at and also to help us with growing the content of our language, not just in our own country but in the Internet environment.

So we’re trying to also capture those that are living outside of the country that have taken the traditional knowledge of the language, and not just the language but also extends to culture and heritage. The way I saw it when I first went to an Internet governance forum that was held in Nairobi but I went to that to receive an award that was given by ISIF as part of the APNIC programme. We received that for the work that we do in Niue for distribution of wireless, putting out Internet to the population on Niue. So, when I arrived there I learned from UNESCO, one of the UNESCO people there, saying things about the language and distribution and lack of content, so I took home some of the ideas from there and I built on that and some of the things that we’re using right now is social media, Twitter, and especially Facebook as well, and reaching across to the dispersed population of Niue.

So we wouldn’t have been able to do this in an old method of trying to call meetings and trying to talk to the people, so we are instantaneously reaching across to the young people especially, the old as well, and not just that but in between who have language. So we try to take the normal English terms and also the phases and just translate those and put them out in social media and saying this is the translation that you could look at, and we are getting a lot of feedback especially from the young people who are born in New Zealand and do not know the language but have some understanding of it, and so we’re trying to create this confidence around it and bringing out this package and saying well if you don’t really understand how to say it, this is how you actually can Tweet using your own language that others will be able to understand.

So it’s slowly trying to build that and that’s to do with the Internet but in terms of ICT we are also looking at trying to incorporate our language in things like spell checkers, thesaurus, dictionaries, online and in packages like Microsoft and Open Source, Open Office Library, so those are some of the things that we’re looking at doing and also in the future maybe capturing things like the legends in Niuean but using them in cartoons or gaming situations. So we have only two main schools which is the high school and the primary school and also early childhood. And one of the things, the initial ideas, was to give some of the work that we do in trying to translate some of the English terms and also the ICT terminologies into the schools that they will be able to help and assist with translating them, not just to translate in the initial stage but to get the children to come forward because they are the ones who understand the technology probably better than the gatekeepers of our language.

But in the long term we would probably wish for the children to have access to applications and software in the Niuean language, so things like in the primary school they tried to do this project called "one laptop per child" before and it didn’t really succeed because there wasn’t any planning that was put into it of how to incorporate it into the curriculum. But if we had all of the software translated into the language, into our Niuean language, and then use that as a tool into the primary schools, because Niuean is the first language that is taught in the schools until a certain age then you mix it with the English language. So if you have this kind of one laptop per child tool using applications that are in the Niuean language then it makes it easier for the teachers to use them and work with the children. So it’s that kind of thing that we want to translate a lot of the packages into Niuean and then work with some institutions into putting the application into the curriculum to be able to promote the language and I can see that possibly this may be our last stand, using ICT and Internet as a way of preserving the language.

I mean gone are the days where we just used language competitions, speeches, if you look at it, only some of the best and articulate students in the language will be able to stand up and confidently speak in our mother tongue, but using gaming, online applications, it actually has a far wider reach and can have a positive effect on reversing the cycle.

Date added: 26/07/2013

Using technology to preserve the Niuean language

Emani Fakaotimanava-lui is director of Internet Niue's service provider RockET Systems Ltd, and Marketing Manager of Hei Niue. Emani describes the loss of Vagahau Niue, the Niuean language, and outlines a number of ways that technology is being used to preserve and share the language, including the use of social media and the involvement of students in Niue.

Views 21,452 Date added: 26/07/2013

Using technology to preserve the Niuean language

My name is Emani Fakaotimanava-lui and I’m from Niue, here with my wife TaniRose as well. I was at the NetHui last year in Auckland and basically I’m involved with the Pacific Islands chapter of the Internet Society and we look after 22 countries in the Pacific and a lot of our countries are moving across to New Zealand from the Pacific, and because of that the loss of language is a reality. 

So in my country of 1,300 there is 20,000 living outside of Niue. Most of them are in Auckland and, based on UNESCO reporting, our language is basically extinct. So this is because a lot of the children are beginning to learn to speak their first language in English instead of Niuean so part of the work that I also do is using the Internet and the ICT as a catalyst to help preserve Vagahau Niue which is the Niuean language. It is good to see that the Government is also working towards like a language week within the New Zealand environment for each country like Samoa, Tonga, Niue and Maori language week which is just happening at the time, so these are the kind of things that we are looking at and also to help us with growing the content of our language, not just in our own country but in the Internet environment.

So we’re trying to also capture those that are living outside of the country that have taken the traditional knowledge of the language, and not just the language but also extends to culture and heritage. The way I saw it when I first went to an Internet governance forum that was held in Nairobi but I went to that to receive an award that was given by ISIF as part of the APNIC programme. We received that for the work that we do in Niue for distribution of wireless, putting out Internet to the population on Niue. So, when I arrived there I learned from UNESCO, one of the UNESCO people there, saying things about the language and distribution and lack of content, so I took home some of the ideas from there and I built on that and some of the things that we’re using right now is social media, Twitter, and especially Facebook as well, and reaching across to the dispersed population of Niue.

So we wouldn’t have been able to do this in an old method of trying to call meetings and trying to talk to the people, so we are instantaneously reaching across to the young people especially, the old as well, and not just that but in between who have language. So we try to take the normal English terms and also the phases and just translate those and put them out in social media and saying this is the translation that you could look at, and we are getting a lot of feedback especially from the young people who are born in New Zealand and do not know the language but have some understanding of it, and so we’re trying to create this confidence around it and bringing out this package and saying well if you don’t really understand how to say it, this is how you actually can Tweet using your own language that others will be able to understand.

So it’s slowly trying to build that and that’s to do with the Internet but in terms of ICT we are also looking at trying to incorporate our language in things like spell checkers, thesaurus, dictionaries, online and in packages like Microsoft and Open Source, Open Office Library, so those are some of the things that we’re looking at doing and also in the future maybe capturing things like the legends in Niuean but using them in cartoons or gaming situations. So we have only two main schools which is the high school and the primary school and also early childhood. And one of the things, the initial ideas, was to give some of the work that we do in trying to translate some of the English terms and also the ICT terminologies into the schools that they will be able to help and assist with translating them, not just to translate in the initial stage but to get the children to come forward because they are the ones who understand the technology probably better than the gatekeepers of our language.

But in the long term we would probably wish for the children to have access to applications and software in the Niuean language, so things like in the primary school they tried to do this project called "one laptop per child" before and it didn’t really succeed because there wasn’t any planning that was put into it of how to incorporate it into the curriculum. But if we had all of the software translated into the language, into our Niuean language, and then use that as a tool into the primary schools, because Niuean is the first language that is taught in the schools until a certain age then you mix it with the English language. So if you have this kind of one laptop per child tool using applications that are in the Niuean language then it makes it easier for the teachers to use them and work with the children. So it’s that kind of thing that we want to translate a lot of the packages into Niuean and then work with some institutions into putting the application into the curriculum to be able to promote the language and I can see that possibly this may be our last stand, using ICT and Internet as a way of preserving the language.

I mean gone are the days where we just used language competitions, speeches, if you look at it, only some of the best and articulate students in the language will be able to stand up and confidently speak in our mother tongue, but using gaming, online applications, it actually has a far wider reach and can have a positive effect on reversing the cycle.

My name is Emani Fakaotimanava-lui and I’m from Niue, here with my wife TaniRose as well. I was at the NetHui last year in Auckland and basically I’m involved with the Pacific Islands chapter of the Internet Society and we look after 22 countries in the Pacific and a lot of our countries are moving across to New Zealand from the Pacific, and because of that the loss of language is a reality. 

So in my country of 1,300 there is 20,000 living outside of Niue. Most of them are in Auckland and, based on UNESCO reporting, our language is basically extinct. So this is because a lot of the children are beginning to learn to speak their first language in English instead of Niuean so part of the work that I also do is using the Internet and the ICT as a catalyst to help preserve Vagahau Niue which is the Niuean language. It is good to see that the Government is also working towards like a language week within the New Zealand environment for each country like Samoa, Tonga, Niue and Maori language week which is just happening at the time, so these are the kind of things that we are looking at and also to help us with growing the content of our language, not just in our own country but in the Internet environment.

So we’re trying to also capture those that are living outside of the country that have taken the traditional knowledge of the language, and not just the language but also extends to culture and heritage. The way I saw it when I first went to an Internet governance forum that was held in Nairobi but I went to that to receive an award that was given by ISIF as part of the APNIC programme. We received that for the work that we do in Niue for distribution of wireless, putting out Internet to the population on Niue. So, when I arrived there I learned from UNESCO, one of the UNESCO people there, saying things about the language and distribution and lack of content, so I took home some of the ideas from there and I built on that and some of the things that we’re using right now is social media, Twitter, and especially Facebook as well, and reaching across to the dispersed population of Niue.

So we wouldn’t have been able to do this in an old method of trying to call meetings and trying to talk to the people, so we are instantaneously reaching across to the young people especially, the old as well, and not just that but in between who have language. So we try to take the normal English terms and also the phases and just translate those and put them out in social media and saying this is the translation that you could look at, and we are getting a lot of feedback especially from the young people who are born in New Zealand and do not know the language but have some understanding of it, and so we’re trying to create this confidence around it and bringing out this package and saying well if you don’t really understand how to say it, this is how you actually can Tweet using your own language that others will be able to understand.

So it’s slowly trying to build that and that’s to do with the Internet but in terms of ICT we are also looking at trying to incorporate our language in things like spell checkers, thesaurus, dictionaries, online and in packages like Microsoft and Open Source, Open Office Library, so those are some of the things that we’re looking at doing and also in the future maybe capturing things like the legends in Niuean but using them in cartoons or gaming situations. So we have only two main schools which is the high school and the primary school and also early childhood. And one of the things, the initial ideas, was to give some of the work that we do in trying to translate some of the English terms and also the ICT terminologies into the schools that they will be able to help and assist with translating them, not just to translate in the initial stage but to get the children to come forward because they are the ones who understand the technology probably better than the gatekeepers of our language.

But in the long term we would probably wish for the children to have access to applications and software in the Niuean language, so things like in the primary school they tried to do this project called "one laptop per child" before and it didn’t really succeed because there wasn’t any planning that was put into it of how to incorporate it into the curriculum. But if we had all of the software translated into the language, into our Niuean language, and then use that as a tool into the primary schools, because Niuean is the first language that is taught in the schools until a certain age then you mix it with the English language. So if you have this kind of one laptop per child tool using applications that are in the Niuean language then it makes it easier for the teachers to use them and work with the children. So it’s that kind of thing that we want to translate a lot of the packages into Niuean and then work with some institutions into putting the application into the curriculum to be able to promote the language and I can see that possibly this may be our last stand, using ICT and Internet as a way of preserving the language.

I mean gone are the days where we just used language competitions, speeches, if you look at it, only some of the best and articulate students in the language will be able to stand up and confidently speak in our mother tongue, but using gaming, online applications, it actually has a far wider reach and can have a positive effect on reversing the cycle.

Date added: 26/07/2013

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